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Full text of "Kansas State collegian"




Happy Ending 

After a six-year stint as 
general manager of 
physical facilities, Fred 
Ferguson has announced 
his retirement See Page 5. 



Weather 










J^ 


Partly Sunny 


Partly sunny and 
cooler today, high in 
low 30s. Wind nor- 
thwest 10 to 20 mph. 



i . 




■ w www* •«■• ■ ■ilnlc 

K-State discus thrower 
Pinkie Suggs proves with a 
record throw that a year 
off as a redshirt has made 
her better than ever. See 
Page 7. 



Kansas 
State 




O 



nam 



Thursday 

January 22, i 987 



Kansas State University 



Manhattan, Kansas 6650* 



Volume 93. Number 82 



Stadium may receive 
facility improvements 



By DAVE WAGNER 
Sports Writer 



KSU Stadium may soon have a different 
look if a plan for improvements proposed 
by football coach Stan Parrish is suc- 
cessful. 

A proposal has been submitted to the 
KSU Foundation to begin a fund-raising 
campaign to upgrade locker room and 
weight lifting facilities at KSU Stadium, 
Athletic Director Larry Travis said 
Wednesday. 

The proposed changes would include ex- 
panding the locker room and providing 
more space for the weight room at a cost 
of approximately $80,000, he said. 

According to sources with the football 
program, Parrish also announced to his 
football squad at the first official meeting 
of the spring semester the possibility that 
within the next two or three years, 
K-State may replace the artificial turf at 
the stadium with natural grass. 

As of yet, though, there has not been a 
public announcement concerning such a 
change. 

"I don't know anything about that. 
Sometimes, maybe the coaches might 
talk about it, but we have not made any 
plans for changing our turf as of now," 
Travis said Parrish was out of town and 
unavailable for comment. 

Normally, fund-raising for a project 
such as the weight lifting facility and 
locker room upgrade doesn't begin until 
approval from the Foundation is obtain- 



ed. But, to the surprise of Foundation 
President Art Loub, a check was received 
from a private donor in support of the pro- 
ject before he had any knowledge of the 
proposal. 

"To some degree yes (it was a 
surprise)," Loub said. "Considering that 
this happens from time- to-time... it really 
isn't a complete surprise." 

"We have discussed the feasibility with 
some donors and they were interested in 
helping us and wanted to get some tax 
breaks before the new year so they sent it 
in on the hope that we'll be able to get it 
done," Travis said. 

Normal procedure for any fund-raising 
project at K-State is to first get approval 
of the administrative committee, which, 
among others, includes Loub and Univer- 
sity President Jon Wefald. From there, if 
approved, the proposal is passed on to the 
Foundation's executive committee. 

Initial approval from the ad- 
ministrative committee has been granted 
and the proposal will be presented to the 
executive committee at its Jan. 27 
meeting. 

"It's now up to the executive committee 
to cast the final judgment," Loub said 
"They don't always follow our recommen- 
dations. It's made up of strong 
knowledgeable people who act on their 
own conscience." 

Travis said changes Parrish had re- 
quested are necessary. 

"Our locker room at the stadium is real- 



See CHANGES, Page 10 



Norton says King's dream 
still eludes blacks, nation 



Admiral wants further facts 
before deployment of SDI 



By The Associated Press 



WASHINGTON - The nations top 
military officer said Wednesday that more 
information is needed before the Reagan ad- 
ministration decides whether to deploy some 
version of a "Star Wars" anti-missile 
system. 

The statement by Adm. William Crowe Jr , 
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, came 
amid reports the administration is consider- 
ing early deployment of the shield against 
nuclear attack called Strategic Defense In- 
itiative or SDI. as Star Wars is formally 
known. 

Crowe told the Senate Armed Services 
Committee that the question of deploying an 
SDI program was "a topic of discussion" 
within top-level Pentagon circles. 

But he said no decision on deployment 
should be made "before we know more than 
we know now." 

President Reagan announced the Star 
Wars research program four years ago 

But SDI supporters on Capitol Hill have 
recently pushed for deployment of some ear- 
ly stages of a system, arguing that Congress 
is unlikely to keep paying for research much 
longer without a deployment decision. 

Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger told 



the Senate Armed Services Committee last 
week that he supports deployment of SDI "as 
soon as possible" if the system is part of a 
long-range plan. Attorney General Edwin 
Meese III also endorsed an early deploy- 
ment. 

Crowe, testifying about the Pentagon's 
budget for the next fiscal year, was asked by 
several senators about the SDI deployment 
reports. Sen. Tim Wirth, D-Colo., said he had 
heard that Reagan might announce a deci- 
sion in next week's State of the Union speech, 
but the admiral replied, "I hadn't heard 
State of the Union." 

Crowe said military planners are looking 
at the various SDI research projects to see 
what type of weapon can be built, but he add- 
ed it will be "quite some time" before that 
review is finished, 

"My own view is that SDI right now is a 
research program," he said. "I hear so much 
said and written that it's (like it is) out there 
in the parking lot and we don't know where to 
put it," 

When Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., asked 
whether it was unlikely that a deployment 
decision could be made this year, Crowe 
answered, "my personal view would be yes" 
that such a decision is unlikely. 




By BECKY HOWARD 
Staff Writer 



As long as the work of Martin Luther King 
Jr. remains unfinished, he will not be an icon 
in history as other great leaders have been, 
said Eleanor Holmes Norton, Georgetown 
University law professor, who spoke at a 
University convocation Wednesday honoring 
the slain civil rights leader. 

Speaking to an audience in McCain 
Auditorium, Norton said because the work 
toward equality King began is not complete, 
he himself cannot be evaluated as a 
historical figure. 

"We may not yet be able to fully assess the 
meaning of King's achievements as only 
history can, but we can certainly assess the 
achievements of our country in moving for- 
ward his goals," she said. 

Norton, former chairwoman of the New 
York City Commission on Human Rights and 
the Equal Employment Opportunity Com- 
mission, said the establishment of the na- 
tional observance of King's birthday must be 
seen as more than just a holiday. 

"Hereafter, many people may only see 
King as a great man whose birthday is a na- 
tional holiday," Norton said. "For sometime 
to come, we must wrestle with the context 
and the meaning of King's legacy. 

"One way to commemorate the King holi- 
day is to use the occasion to examine the 
issue of race, especially in some of its more 
controversial contexts, against the 
American standard of freedom other 
Americans have experienced, to make a 
racial assessment of how far we have come 
and why." 

Norton said the work accomplished by 
King has reached a stagnant period in com- 
parison to the highly active era of the '60s, 
when many of the advancements in civil 
rights were made. 

"Presidential administrations since King's 
assassination have not been helpful in conti- 
nuing what he began," Norton said. 
"Although we have come a long way. there 
are still many more issues, especially com- 
plex ones in racial equality to be considered 
and improved upon." 

Norton cited some of the new challenges 
blacks must face in a continuing quest for 
equality, including the importance of 
strengthening the black family, unemploy- 
ment, poverty, the encouragement of black 
business and the improvement of education 
for blacks. 

"We (blacks) have to work harder to fill in 
the background we lack with education; 
that's the message that needs to be sent to- 
day," she said. "Somebody needs to tell 
America there is no easy way to equality. 
Progress in equality happened out of bitter 
and frustrating experience We have to work 
to continue what Martin Luther King Jr. 
began." 

Norton began her address with a 
retrospective view of racial equality. 

"The United States has evolved differently 
than other countries where the main strug- 
gles have been on equality of economic 
classes rather than our country, where 



Staff Brad Fanshief 

Eleanor Holmes Norton, Georgetown University law professor, responds t« questions al a press 
conference before the All-University Convocation Wednesday in .McCain Auditorium. 



See NORTON. Page 3 



Officials propose random drug testing 



By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - The Transporta- 
tion Department and Congress began 
moving Wednesday toward requiring 
random drug-testing of airline and 
railroad industry employees, and the 
department said it plans to test 26,500 
of its own workers as well. 

Transportation Secretary 
Elizabeth Dole disclosed plans for 
the broad-ranging drug testing and 
rehabilitation program as several 
members of Congress said they will 
introduce drug-testing legislation in 
the coming days. 

The whirlwind of activity involving 
random drug testing, a controversial 
issue for some time, came a week 
after the disclosure that marijuana 
had been used by two Conrail train 
operators involved in a collision with 
an Amtrak passenger train Jan. 4. 

Sixteen people were killed and 175 
injured in the accident. 

"People have a right to expect and 
receive a drug-free transportation 
system." Dole said in an interview. 
"There's no area where a person's 
decision to use drugs would have a 



more disastrous impact than in 
transportation." 

She said DOT plans to push for 
legislation requiring random drug- 
testing for train operators, but will 
move on its own through new regula- 
tions to require such testing of com- 
mercial pilots, flight crews and other 
aviation employees responsible for 
safe flight operations. 

At the same time the department 
plans within "three or four weeks" to 
have in place an internal drug- 
testing and rehabilitation program 
for 26,500 DOT employees involved in 
safety or security related jobs, Dole 
said. 

The program, which is viewed as a 
prototype for what the department 
plans to require for the rail and avia- 
tion industries, calls for pre- 
employment drug testing, testing 
after an accident, random testing 
and periodic testing of all employees 
involved in security or safety-related 
jobs 

Drug testing of government 
employees under a presidential 
directive issued last year is under 
court challenge with a trial expected 



soon in U.S. District Court in New 
Orleans. Rail and aviation labor 
groups in the past have strongly de- 
nounced any requirements for ran- 
dom drug -testing, claiming it to be 
unreliable and a violation of an 
employee's constitutional rights. 

Dole acknowledged that random 
testing "obviously is an emotional 
issue" that has raised controversy. 
But, she argued, in the case of 
workers involved in transportation 
"you look at a balance between the 
safety and security needs of the 
public and the constitutional rights of 
the individual." 

Required random testing for cer- 
tain safety-related occupations were 
included initially in a comprehensive 
anti-drug bill enacted by Congress 
last year, but the testing provisions 
were dropped before the bill was 
finally approved. 

Dole said she anticipates the drug 
testing program at DOT will be in 
force within three or four months 
The aviation industry's program 
must go through normal rule-making 
procedures and probably would not 
be in effect before late 1967, and then 



it is likely to be challenged in the 
courts. 

There are no federal requirements 
for testing airline employees for 
drugs, although many airlines con- 
duct such tests if drug use is 
suspected on the part of a pilot. A 
year-old federal regulation allows 
testing for probable cause by 
railroads, but critics argue that it 
failed to detect marijuana use by the 
Conrail crew involved in the Amtrak 
accident. 

As Dole announced her plans, 
several members of Congress said 
they are ready to introduce legisla- 
tion calling for drug-testing of 
workers involved in public transpor- 
tation. 

Legislation offered by Sen. John 
Danforth, R-Mo., calls for random 
testing of commercial pilots, flight 
crew and air traffic controllers as 
well as train operators. "It is only 
reasonable to expect people who 
have hundreds of lives in their hands 
to be drug-free,'' said Danforth. 

"Unfortunately it seems to take a 
tragedy to move some legislation," 
said Rep. E. Clay Shaw, R-Fla 



Senator proposes bill 
negating welfare cuts 



By The Associated Press 



TOPEKA - Sen Wint Winter 
Jr.. R-Lawrence, has drafted for 
introduction today in the Senate a 
bill to restore more than $1 
million in funding for the state 
welfare agency which was cut 
from the budget last week. 

Winter's proposal is modest 
compared to the $8 1 million 
restoration bill introduced in the 
House Wednesday by another 
member of the Lawrence 
legislative delegation: Rep 
Jessie Branson, a Democrat. 

"I think it's clear from 
statements made by members of 
the Senate that we should revisit 
these areas and restore the cute 
we made last week," Winter said, 
"This bill would restore funding 
for children in need, troubled 
kids, and other people who have 
no alternatives. I hope we can be 



realistic about our budget pro- 
blems and yet respond to the 
needs of the people." 

Although Winter's bill is much 
less expensive than Branson's, 
both bills target the same areas: 
dependent children, foster care 
and day care. 

Winter proposes returning 
$778,528 of the funding cut from 
the state welfare agency's aid to 
dependent children program. He 
wants $228,000 put back in foster 
care programs and $17,000 
restored to day care funding 

In addition. Winter wants to 
give $19,000 back to the Kansas 
Arte Commission to reduce that 
agency's cut to 3.8 percent 
because he said it was unfair to 
ask the commission to swallow 
the 6 percent budget cut it suf- 
fered. 

See RESTORE. Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COUSGIAH, TTwday, Januwy 22. 1MT 



riefly 



By The Associated Press 



NATIONAL 

Reagan to meet with commission 

WASHINGTON — A commission investigating U.S. arms sales to 
Iran and National Security Council operations on Wednesday nailed 
down an appointment with President Reagan and won three more 
weeks to finish its work. 

While the panel headed by former Sen. John Tower interviewed 
former President Jimmy Carter in Plains, Ga., White House 
spokesman Larry Speakes revealed that Reagan will meet with the 
commission next Monday. 

Speakes said Reagan is expected to review White House files with 
counsel Peter J. Wallison before the session with Tower and two 
other panel members, former Secretary of State Edmund S. Muskie 

Speakes said Reagan is expected to review White House files with 
counsel Peter J. Wallison before the session with Tower and two 
other panel members, former Secretary of State Edmund S. Muskie 
and former National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft. 

Air Force jets collide; 2 missing 

BKOWNWOOD, Texas — Two military reconnaissance jets collided 
and crashed in flames in a remote area Wednesday, and two of the 
four crew members aboard parachuted to safety, authorities said. 

A search was launched for the other two crew members following 
the collision about 4 p.m. near Lake Brownwood, and human body 
parts were found among the wreckage, said Fire Capt. Donald 
Reiger. Airman Scott Herring, a spokesman for Bergstrom Air Force 
Base, refused to comment on whether the two missing crew 
members had been killed. 

No one on the ground was injured in the accident. 

Witnesses said they saw three parachutes, one empty, falling to the 
ground after the crash, said Steve Wittenberg, a dispatcher for the 
Department of Public Safety. 

An officer found the smoldering wreckage in a field just west of 
Texas Highway 279, a half-mile from Lake Brownwood, he said. 

The RF4C Phantom II reconnaissance planes were from Bergstrom 
and are used primarily for photographic reconnaissance missions, 
Herring said 

INTERNATIONAL 

Soviets attempt to curb birth rate 

MOSCOW - Soviet authorities said Wednesday they will try to 
curb the birth rate in the mostly Moslem republic of Tadjikistan 
despite a longstanding nationwide campaign for bigger families. 

A report by the official news agency Tass said the Central Asian 
republics birth rate is the country's highest, with six or more 
children per family the norm, creating "a demographic situation 
which is growing complicated." 

The Central Statistical Board, in year-end figures released Satur- 
day, said the national birth rate increased one-half percent last year, 
from is) 4 newborns per 1,000 people to 19.9 per 1,000. It did not give 
any breakdown showing where the population growth was the 
greatest The population is now 281.7 million. 

Current population figures for Tadzhikistan are not available, but 
in 1979 Ihe republic had 4 6 million people. Tajiks formed the largest 
ethnic group - 2.7 million, or about 59 percent. About 395,000 Rus- 
sians lived in Tadzhikistan 

In the European part of the Soviet Union, many couples have just 
i»ne child because of housing problems or career choices. The 
average Soviet woman has six abortions, according to a 1981 world 
population study by the United Nations. Contraceptive devices and 
birth control pills are shortage items. 

Incentives have long been offered for larger families, and women 
bearing 10 children or more are named a "Hero Mother." 



REGIONAL 

Racetrack plans win endorsement 

WICHITA — A proposal to build a $20 million to $25 million horse 
and greyhound racetrack near Wichita won an endorsement from the 
Sedgwick County Commission Wednesday. 

It was believed to be the first time a city or county governing body 
has endorsed a track proposal since a pari-mutuel wagering constitu- 
tional amendment was adopted by voters in November, said a 
spokesman for Richard J. Boushka, a Wichita businessman who is 
co-owner of Sunflower Racing Inc., the company that wants to build 
the facility. 

County commissioners made it clear their endorsement wasn't ex- 
clusive. They said if other developers present acceptable plans, those 
will also be endorsed. 

The site Sunflower Racing has selected is near the Kansas Col- 
iseum on Interstate 135 just north of Wichita, 

Plans call for the greyhound, quarter horse and thoroughbred track 
to be situated on 100-plus acres. It would have a seating capacity of 
4,600. Sunflower Racing officials said the track could generate about 
700 jobs. 

The Kansas Legislature must enact legislation and the governor 
must appoint a racing commission before developers will be licensed 
to construct and operate tracks. Sunflower officials said they believe 
endorsements such as the one approved by county commissioners 
will be an advantage when the racing commission begins selecting 
track sites and developers. 

KU officials to reduce student jobs 

LAWRENCE — Rather than furlough full-time facilities operations 
employees, officials at the University of Kansas announced Tuesday 
they would reduce other operating expenses and student employment 
in that department. 

Earlier, KU officials were reviewing budget reduction plans to 
decide whether furloughs would be a way to deal with more than $3 
million in budget cuts the Kansas Legislature dealt to KU last week. 

According to a statement released by Rodger Oroke, director of 
support services, 29 students have been notified that their jobs have 
been terminated. The University is making an effort to find them 
other employment, Oroke said. 

Seven employees currently working on temporary or emergency 
appointments also will be notified that their appointments have been 
cancelled, he said. In addition, about 38 vacant positions in facilities 
operations will remain unfilled for the remainder of the fiscal year, 
which runs through June. 



Death penalty opponents testify 

TOPEKA — Besides being a cruel and archaic form of punishment, 
the death penalty would drain more than $50 million from essential 
state programs before even one execution is carried out, opponents of 
capital punishment told a panel of lawmakers Wednesday. 

"In the five to 10 years that will be required before a single execu- 
tion occurs in Kansas, our state can expect to spend millions of 
dollars," University of Kansas law professor David J. Gottlieb told 
the House Federal and State Affairs Committee. 

"As a rough estimate, the figure may easily exceed $50 million 
before the first execution occurs." 

Gottlieb was among nine people who testified during a two-hour 
hearing against a bill that calls for death by lethal injection as a 
possible sentence for people convicted of first -degree and felony 
murder in the state. 

Death penalty supporters, including a large contingent of law en- 
forcement personnel, were given an hour to present their side of the 
argument to the panel Tuesday. 



Campus Bulletin 




TONIGHT 
$DAZE$ 

•Open 12:30 p.m. 
Saturday 

•Watch the 
Cats on the 
big screen. 

•$2.50 pitchers 

•Sailing Club Party 
Saturday 

1800 Claflin 539-9619 



SEMESTER IN SPAIN 

(BEGINNER OR ADVANCED) 

Not just for Spanish majors only, but for everyone: beginners, "in between" 
students, and advanced. Put some excitement into your college career" 



BEGINNER OR ADVANCED-Cost is about 
the same as a semester in a US. college: 
S3.B70 Price includes jet round trip to 
Seville from New York. room, board, and 
tuition complete Government grants and 
loans may be applied towards our 
programs 

AP-ia 



eo' lege you aliend 



you' iimo 



you' n'«iK'it mm.). i adareit 



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I'D 



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your perniantfrtj Mreot atldraft*. 



=2 I 



Live with a Spanish family, attend classes 
(our hours a day. tour days a week, lour 
months. Earn 16 hrs. of credit {equivalent 
to 4 semesters taught in US. colleges over 
a two year time span) Your Spanish studies 
will be enhanced by opportunities not avail- 
able in a U.S. classroom. Standardized 
tests snow our students' language skills 
superior to students completing two year 
programs in U.S. Advanced courses also 

Hurry It takes a lot of time to make all ar- 
rangements 

SPRING SEMESTER — Jan 30-May 29 
FALL SEMESTER-Aug 29-Dec 19 

each year 

FULLY ACCREDITED— A Program of Trinity 

ChnstianCotlege 

For full information — send coupon to: 

SEMESTER IN SPAIN 

2065 Laraway Lake Drive S E . AP-1Z 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 49506 
(A Program of Trinity Christian College) 



Closed Classes — Spring 1987 



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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

I l.K ARN is looking for a few good volunteer* 

for this spring Don't waste awiy llw spring hours 
- be a ULearN volunteer Call 132*442 or stop 
by Hollon Kail 02 

KM. II SI I CONVERSATIONAL TLTORINli 

PROGRAM, offered by ihe International Student 
Cenler, needs volunteer tutors for more infor 
mation. call Karen at 5334448 

STUDENT ELECTIONS COMMITTEE: Filing 
deadline for SGA elections is Tuesday Applica- 
tion* are available in the SGS office for student 
body president, student senators and Board of 
Student Publications 

ALPHA ML' ALPHA: All resumes are due Jan 
30. and members should contact Teresa Leighty 
Also, there will be a field trip Jan 30 to Hallmark 
Members should contact Angle Rowland if in 
teres ted 

AG STUDENT COUNCIL ELECTION AP 
PLICATIONS are available In Waters 120 and are 
due Monday 

OPEN HOUSE SPECIAL EVENTS COMMIT- 
TEE: Any student or organization interested in 
performing as a special event for Open House '97 
can contact Kalhy Peirce at 1304651 or the Col 
lege of Aria and Sciences office at 132-6900 



TODAV 



ANOREXIA NERVOSA AND ASSOCIATED 
DISORDERS meets at 7:30 p m in Union 205 

OMICHON NC meets at 7 p m in Justin ISO. 

GAV AND LESBIAN HESOURCE CENTER 
meets at 7 p.m. in Union 203. 

NAT1DNAL SOCIETY OP BLACK 

ENGINEERS meets to hear a discussion on the 
sta te of bla cks i n engineeri ng a 1 6 p m in Durland 
162 

(iRE AT COMMISSION STUDENTS will hive a 
pro-life march at Ham beginning in front of the 
International Student Center The marrh will end 
at the Union, where there will be a speaker at 
noon in the courtyard 

RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB meets at 7 p.m. in 
Union 209 

AG COUNCIL meets at 6 p m in Waters 137 

FOREST AND PARK RESOURCE CLUB 
meets at 7 p m in Call 228 

SAILING CLUB meets at 7 p.m. in Union 208 

11 Tilt s CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP meets at 
S p m in Union Little Theatre 

PARACHUTE CLI'B meets at 7 p m in Union 
208 

SOCIETY Htlt THE ADVANCEMENT OF 



PHE- VET CLUB meets at 7 pm. In Trotter 201 MANAGEMENT meets at 7 p.m in Union 213. 

Local judge sentences 
Moyer to 30-day term 



By The Collegian Staff 



A former K-State extension pro- 
fessor began serving a 30-day jail 
term in the Riley County Jail 
Wednesday evening after being 
found guilty of selling surplus 
government property and changing 
official documents for profit. 

William J. Moyer, Manhattan, was 
found guilty of six counts of making 
false writings and five counts of 
felony theft, stemming from the 
unauthorized use of surplus federal 
equipment assigned to the Depart- 



\ , 33MFa33^Mj 

/■rrNtym did' 

beet- tWOjll . 

Pict *p uflUA Urf\L 

•Ioju/txUaiA 4&*?* 
,<3H hnuA-o wfrr ! 



ment of Extension Forestry. 

Moyer was sentenced Tuesday by 
Riley County District Judge Jerry 
Mershon to 3-10 years in prison and 
given probation, which will begin 
after the completion of the Hit-day jail 
term, said John Rork, assistant at- 
torney general. 





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ELIGIBILITY FOR CARE 

AT 

LAFENE STUDENT 

HEALTH CENTER 



. Health fees are established upon the recommendation of the 
Student Senate with approval by the Board of Regents 

. All students who are enrolled and attending classes during a 
regular semester or summer session who have paid health fees 
are eligible for care. 

Those enrolled in Special Courses, for varying periods of time, 
who have made previous arrangements for health care 
coverage at Lafene are eligible for care (Lists of these students 
must be furnished prior to being seen at Lafene.) 

Only students, who have paid the health fee, may elect to ha^'e 
their spouse also covered at Lafene; however, they must pay 
the spouse fee within 10 days of the time their own health fees 
are paid. (Children cannot be seen.) 

Emergency care, prior to referral, will be given anyone who 
comes in. 

Students enrolled in 6 hours or less, electing not to pay the 
health fee during the Fall or Spring semesters, who wish to be 
seen, will be charged $20 for each office visit This charge 
continues until the full health fee has been exceeded, then that 
student will be afforded the same privileges as the regular fee 
paying student for the remainder of that semester. 
Students who were enrolled in the Spring and pre-enrolled for 
the Fall semester but not attending summer school may pay $15 
and be eligible for care during the summer This fee may be 
paid within 30 days prior to summer registration and ends the 
day classes begin. A late fee of $20 will be accepted for the 
remainder of the summer. 
8. Health fees are good until 1 2 o'clock the night the next semester 
begins 



NOTE: In addition to the above mentioned fees, there are minimal 
charges for certain supplies and services and the charges 
are subject to change without prior notice. 



Advertisement 



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mwmmimmmmmi 




"Franchise Opportunity Night" for the Manhattan Town Center afforded 
Steven L. Hintgen. president of I>og n* Cat Pet Centers of America Inc.. 



Slaff 'Greg Vn«e! 



Denver, the chance to point out to Jeff Casale, Overland Park, the advantages 
of having a franchise in the shopping mall which opens in November. 



Companies vie for possible franchisers 



By CHRIS DOLL 
SUff Writer 



The sight of cinnamon rolls baking 
to a golden brown with lots of 
frosting and raisins appears and a 
voice says, "just like grandma would 
make." The claim is that even 
American apple pie is stepping aside 
to the "perfections." 

Does it make you hungry? Hungry 
enough to buy the store? 

Mrs. Powell's Cinnamon Rolls 
company used the advertisement to 
lure prospective franchisers to their 
table Tuesday night at the Holidome, 
part of "Franchise Opportunity 
Night," sponsored by Manhattan 
Town Center 

Interested investors had the oppor- 
tunity to inquire about some of the 
franchises that might locate in 
Manhattan Town Center, now under 
construction and scheduled to open 
in November. 

The stores represented were 
Petland, Dog n" Cat, Bresslers, 
Cone-A-Copia. Taco Casa, Steak 
Break, Fan Fair, Bath & a-half, But 
terfields, Mr. Bulky 's and Mrs. 
Powell's Cinnamon Rolls. 

Most people said they were there 



out of curiosity, but others were 
seriously considering buying a fran- 
chise, Nelda Andres, fifth-year 
senior in architecture, said she 
would like to open a pet store. 

"It would be my store," she said. 
"They (the store) said they would let 
me sell pretty much what I wanted 
to." 

Andres said franchising was less of 
a risk than setting up her own 
business. 

"This is totally set up," she said. 
"If I were to walk in blind and set up 
a business, it would cost a lot more." 

Others were interested in purshas- 
ing a store but were leary about the 
price. Vichai Sumangkokul and Ken- 
ja Takada, international 
businessmen from Kansas City, said 
they were looking for an investment 



opportunity. 

"There are risks involved." 
Sumangkokul said. "It looks good — 
sounds good. But it maybe a lemon." 

Each store had a range for a start- 
up fee depending on floor space, 
equipment and inventory desired by 
the franchiser. The lowest unit cost 
was $35,000 at Cone-A-Copia and the 
highest was $300,000 for Petland 

Some stores like Dog n' Cat finance 
the buyers. Others help put together 
a package the franchiser could take 
to the bank. 

The interest rate would fall bet- 
ween M4 percent and 12 percent, said 
Steve Johnson of Union National 
Bank, 727 Poyntz Ave. 



Most of the franchise businesses 
said they had talked to area mer- 
chants interested in franchising their 
stores. 

"I had seven or eight people asking 
the right questions, which makes me 
believe they were interested," said 
Larry Childers, who is with Butter 
fields and Fan Fair. 

He said Manhattan was a good 
area for businesses to locate because 
the rent is less than in bigger cities, 
and also smaller cities tend to have 
less competition. 

Chris Heavey, general manager of 
the mall, said he was pleased with 
the turnout of both prospective fran- 
chisers and retailers 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurwlay, January 22, 1M7 

Lindamood to move, 
won't seek re-election 



By TOM) St'llULTZ 

Collegia n Reporter 




After serving six 
years on the city 
commission and one 
year as mayor of 
Manhattan, Su- 
zanne Lindamood, 
associate professor 
of clothing, textiles 
and interior design 
and housing, an- Mntlamoocl 
nounced Thursday that she will not 
run for re-election. 

Lindamood's husband, Sherman 
Hanna, has accepted the position of 
head of the Department of Family 
Resource Management at Ohio State 
University in Columbus, and the 
family plans to move within the next 
year. 

When beginning her first term as 
commissioner, Lindamood said her 
primary goal was to educate the 
citizens of Manhattan about how city 
decisions are made and how these 
decisions affect them. Lindamood 
said she believes most issues are be- 
ing studied rationally and that the 
public is well-informed. 

However, Lindamood said she 
feels the public has not been suffi- 
ciently informed about the Manhat- 
tan Town Center mall, and wishes 
that alternatives for financing the 
mall had been studied more and ex- 
plained to the public. 

The city is not using the least cost- 
ly alternative for financing the shop- 
ping mall, she said. 

"Tax increment financing using 
special obligation bonds is far more 
expensive than general obligation 
financing," Lindamood said. 

The commission is using tax- 
increment financing with special 
obligation bonds. These bonds pose 
more risk to the bond holder and 
therefore have a higher interest rate. 
General obligation financing is 
usually the cheapest form of financ- 
ing. Lindamood said. The bond 
holder is guaranteed that the bonds 
will be paid off 

A referendum was never held on 
the bond issue Lindamood said she 
believes the public should have voted 
on the mall's construction. 

"The public would have been made 
aware of the financing alternatives 
and the actual public cost" if a 
referendum had been held, she said 
Voting requires a more in-depth 



study of the issues, she said. 

"Government has no money. They 
use other people's money for 
everything,'' Lindamood said. She 
said the commission is doing the peo- 
ple's spending for them. 

She said she has never seen a cost- 
benefit study and believes one has 
never been done. Costs have been 
coming in by "bits and pieces," and 
as costs rise, benefits are reduced, 
Lindamood said 

Cost vs. benefits studies should 
have been made available to the 
public to let the people decide if the 
benefits were worth the cost, she 
said. 

"We have been using community 
development money to support the 
mall," Lindamood said. She said she 
believes this money should be used in 
low- and moderate-income 
neighborhoods to help the people who 
are living there. 

Lindamood said some of the money 
being used for the mall is school tax 
money. 

"I don't think most people would 
approve of helping to pay for cost 
overruns by using school tax money. 
That is tax money that would have 
gone to the schools had there been no 
cost overruns, or if we had chosen 
another method of financing over- 
runs," she said. 

Lindamood said she doesn't 
believe government money should be 
subsidizing "big mall developers." 

The commission is using communi- 
ty development money for parking 
lots, when the money should be going 
to improve living quality, Lin- 
damood said. Over the past six 
years, the commission had used 
block grant money to buy housing 
around the mall area The area has 
now been cleared for mall parking, 
she said. 

Recently, $300,000 was used to buy 
property that will be used as parking 
next to the new office building 
downtown, Lindamood said. 

To provide incentive for expan- 
sion, the Kansas Legislature gave 
cities the right to make certain con- 
struction projects exempt or partial- 
ly exempt from sales tax and income 
tax, she said. The mall construction 
and Aggieville both fall into this ex- 
emption. 

"We have to take a good look at the 
city's role, not only Manhattan but 
all cities, in the state's current 
economic situation," she said. 



It's easy to take. 




The Busch 12-pack. 

El* tht- Busch twelve-park of iwdw-otmce. nun-ret umable 
buttle*. And if- the easn**l w.u to tate twelve, smooth, «reat- 

laslitu: HumIi lieei- iinwlk-re. yw^ 

Head for the Mountains. BUSCH. 

THE BUSCH 12-PACK 

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Clubs in the Arts & Sciences College 

interested in being allocated 

by Arts & Sciences council 

must attend a mandatory meeting. 

Monday, Jan. 26 

7 p.m. 
Union Rm. 208 



PRE-VET CLUB 

First Meeting of the Semester 

TONIGHT 

7 p.m. in Trotter Hall 201 

Guest Speaker is Dr. Samuelson 

on the topic 
of "Human-Animal Bond" 



Editorial 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thursday, January 22, 1987 - 4 




EDITOR 

Jonie Trued 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Sue Dawson 

NEWS EDITOR 

Erin Eicher 



EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 

Deron Johnson 
PlIOTO/ORAPHICS EDITOR 

Andy Nelson 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Sheila Hutinett 



KIHTOKI U. KOVKO: Susan Bairti, Sue Dawson. Jim Dteti, Enn Eicher. Judy Goldberg. Ron Konig, Pat Humt. 
Deron Johnson. Judv Lundsirom. Scotl Miller. Andy Nelson. Path Paxson. Julie Reynolds. Chns Stewart, Teresa 
Temme, Jonie Trued Unsigned editorials represent the majority opinion ol the editorial board 

TIIK llll.l !•:(,! \\ il'SKSiKl Ittfli is published by Student Publications Inc . KansasStale University, daily except 
Salurdajs Sundays holidays and University vacation periods olTlfKSare in the north wing or KediieHall. phone 
Kia-ttM SKtllMH I \SS POST WK paid at Manhattan. Kan 66502 SI as« HI PTIO> HVTKS calendar year, «0, 
academic year, 135. semester. *20: summer term, lit) Address changes and letters (nine editor should be sent to the 
Kansas Stale Collegian, Kedzie 103. Kansas State University. Manhattan. Kan 665*16 



Execution of criminals 
is not answer for state 



Early this week, the Kansas 
House Federal and State Affairs 
Committee heard testimony from 
supporters of a bill which would 
allow the state to kill people con- 
victed of first-degree murder. 
Rep. Clyde Graeber, 
R-Leaven worth, led the charge 
by claiming, "Capital punish- 
ment is the mark of a society 
which holds dear the lives of its 
citizens." 

Graeber did not explain how we 
can value the lives of our citizens 
after we kill them. After a 13 year 
hiatus, Graeber and Gov. Mike 
Hayden are anxious to bring the 
death penalty back to Kansas. 

But what arguments did 
Graeber and other advocates of 
the death penalty use? They 
could not have argued that the 
death penalty is an effective 
deterrent to crime. The U.S. 
Supreme Court has analyzed 20 
years of crime statistics and 
found the death penalty does not 
deter crime. Other studies have 
found that an increase in the 
crime rate occurs following ex- 
ecutions. 

Death penalty advocates could 
not argue that it would save 
money. The Board of Indigents 
Defense Services has estimated 
the cost of providing public 
defenders will increase $2.6 
million annually if the death 
penalty is imposed. Add to this 
the cost of building and maintain- 
ing death row facilities and the 
taxpayers will be hit with yet 
another burden in these already 
economically hard times. 

Furthermore, a murder trial 
and the first step of the appeals 
process cost more than twice as 
much as keeping someone in 
prison for life. The only way 
around this is to do away with the 



appeals process and thus greatly 
increase the chances of executing 
innocent people. Since 1900, an 
average of one person per year 
has been executed and later 
found to be not guilty. 

But there is still one more 
reason to oppose the death penal- 
ty — it is a racist form of punish- 
ment. Studies indicate that an 
unusally high proportion of 
blacks are given the death 
sentence. Even taking into con- 
sideration the higher percentage 
of blacks convicted of murder, 
the percentage of blacks ex- 
ecuted is still proportionally 
much higher. 

A study conducted at Nor- 
theastern University in Boston 
examined the racial backgrounds 
of more than 2,000 convicted 
murderers sentenced to death. 
What this study found was shock- 
ing. Of the black offenders accus- 
ed of killing blacks, 1.5 percent 
received the death sentence. Of 
whites accused of killing whites, 
12.3 percent were sentenced to 
death. Of whites accused of kill- 
ing blacks, 5.25 percent were 
sentenced to death and an 
astonishing 89 percent of blacks 
accused of killing whites were 
given the death sentence. 

Those who would give the state 
the right to murder did not rely 
on any of these arguments 
because they could not. They 
argued instead that the death 
penalty is a fitting sentence for 
people who kill people. 

Graeber, Hayden and their 
cohorts seem to think that killing 
is so wrong the state should kill 
people to prove it. Indeed, killing 
is wrong and that is precisely 
why Kansans should not allow the 
state to be hired out as a contract 
killer with tax money. 



Addition of Washburn 
not feasible right now 



Although the addition of 
Washburn University to the 
Regents system is a good idea, 
now is not the time for that addi- 
tion. 

As the Board of Regents 
wrestles with Gov. Mike 
Haydens mandated 3.8 percent 
cuts in education, the seven 
Regents schools currently in the 
system are feeling the pinch. 

Budgets have been cut, some 
classes have been cancelled and 
presidents of the six universities 
and one technical school under 
the Regents umbrella have been 
forced to undergo a 3.8 percent 
cut in their salaries. The 
economy is hardly capable of 
supporting another member 
school at this time. 

Squeezing Washburn into this 
fiscally strained system would 
cause even more of a financial 
drain on the limited resources of 
the universities faced with the 
difficulty of maintaining stan- 
dards of quality education. 

Hayden recently approved the 
appointment of four new 
members to the Board of 
Regents, and all four are believed 
to support the admission of 
Washburn. In fact, Hayden made 
his intentions clear by saying he 



selected people with "willingness 
and courage" to address the 
Washburn issue. 

In his campaign for governor, 
Hayden promised to work to 
make Washburn a Regents 
school. He said he was acting for 
"people who have an overriding 
concern about the future of 
higher education in Kansas." 

The future of education will not 
be so bright if Hayden moves too 
quickly to bring Washburn into 
an overtaxed system. If other 
state universities are made to 
suffer for the sake of this one, 
more bad than good will be ac- 
complished by the move. 

In a time of financial security, 
the addition of Washburn to the 
system would be a positive one 
for Kansas education. More con- 
trol could be placed on class and 
degree offerings to eliminate 
duplication of programs, and the 
state system would acquire a 
respected university with a 
modern campus. 

Until that time, the Board of 
Regents must protect the in- 
terests of its current constituent 
universities, and adding the 
Washburn burden would not be 
the way to accomplish this. 



Roe vs. Wade: 14 years later 

Con: Abortion leaves many victims 



Today marks the 14th anniversary of Roe 
vs. Wade, the Supreme Court decision which 
legalizes abortion for any reason through all 
nine months of pregnancy. Abortion is one 
issue that affects all of us. With more than 20 
million abortions having been done since 1973 
and the teenage pregnancy rate going up 
while the birthrate of those same teens is go- 
ing down, there is a pretty good chance that 
someone you know or love has had an abor- 
tion. Maybe you have had an abortion. 

Abortion is an act that leaves many vic- 
tims. One obvious victim is the baby killed by 
the abortion. Medical science is so advanced 
these days that much is known about life in 
the womb that wasn't known in 1973 when the 
Supreme Court decision was made. I 
primarily want to discuss the victimization 
of the woman who has an abortion, however. 

The abortion industry has pulled the big- 
gest sham in medical history. Patients must 
be told the risks and what is involved in most 
surgical procedures and must give informed 
consent before surgery can be done in every 
case except abortion. 

Pregnant women are deliberately not 
shown any details concerning the develop- 
ment of their unborn baby, are not told any of 
the risks to their own health and are given a 
glossing over of the procedure itself. Why? 
Incredibly, the reason given is that they want 
the woman to be free from outside influence 
so that she is able to make her decision 
without any coercion. In this case, coercion 
means knowing what the surgical procedure 
actually involves, being told the risks and, of 
course, being told that the baby in her womb 
is very much human and alive. 

Knowing the truth would stop women from 
having abortions, so it's a no-no to tell 
women all the facts. Abortion is, after all, 
very profitable to the abortionist, and women 
not having abortions means less money in 
the bank The glossing over of these facts 
shows in the lingo. 

A woman who is glad she is pregnant is 
asked when her baby is due, listens to the 
baby's heartbeat, is encouraged to eat right, 
talk to the baby, sing to the baby and pay at- 
tention to the baby's actions in the womb in 
order to have an indication of how he or she 
will act once born. She is asked if she wants a 
boy or a girl and names are chosen. Her un- 
born child is always referred to as the com- 




ing baby. If she miscarries, people offer 
sympathy that she has lost her baby and she 
goes through a time of mourning. 

What happens to a woman who isn't so sure 
she's happy to be pregnant is an entirely dif- 
ferent story. This woman is called upon to 
make decisions during a time of her life when 
there is deep trauma. Her child is never 
referred to as a baby, but as a product of con- 
ception or fetal tissue. She is told no details of 
its development, never hears the heartbeat 
and no due date is discussed. 

The abortion itself is called "re- 
establishing her menstrual cycle" or 
"removing the tissue." She is told she will be 
relieved to end her pregnancy and her life 
will be ruined if she doesn't abort. She is not 
told of the risks of the procedure, that it may 
leave her with grave physical consequences, 
that she may, indeed, even be left sterile. 

No one tells her that she is about to kill the 
only baby she may ever carry. And, of 
course, no mention is made of the fact that if 
she has any conscience at all she will be deal- 
ing with the guilt involved in this for years. It 
seems like a simple solution to a very embar- 
rassing problem. When she does abort, there 
is relief that her "problem" is solved, and 
everyone assumes that life has returned to 
normal. Forget it and go on. It isn't that 
easy. 

The act of conception alters a woman's 
physical make-up, introducing into her 
system hormones which make her a mother. 
Her body knows she is a mother, and her con- 
science knows she is a mother. All her life 
she has known that pregnancy means 
motherhood. When she kills what is in her, 
she violates her own body and conscience 
and denies her upbringing. 

Psychologists have found that a previous 
abortion is the most common factor in the 



past of women who are suicidal. Suicide at- 
tempts often come at the time of the year 
when the baby would have been born — 
that's the due date no one would talk about. 

She often finds herself obsessed with 
children who are the age her baby would 
have been. She may become frigid, depress- 
ed, or more often, hardened by her ex- 
perience. So, even though she may not admit 
she has killed her own child, and though she 
may seem relieved immediately after the 
abortion, what she has done will haunt her. 

Those who guide her to an abortion as the 
"easy" solution to her problem do her no ser- 
vice at all. They only give a bigger, though 
hidden, problem called guilt to deal with for 
the rest of her life. So, what can you do to 
help your friend, girlfriend or yourself after 
this has happened? 

Because I am a Christian, I have to look at 
this from a Christian point of view. I have 
never seen anyone recover from the pain 
after the abortion without first finding out 
that they can somehow be forgiven. The fact 
that Christ can offer that forgiveness is what 
makes the relationship with Him necessary 
to the one who is suffering the guilt and the 
pain that come after the abortion. 

In I Timothy 1:15, the Apostle Paul states 
that "Christ Jesus came into the world to 
save sinners, among whom I am the 
foremost of all." Paul had many men, 
women and children killed before he came to 
Christ for that forgiveness that only He can 
provide If Paul the murderer can be 
forgiven, so can the woman who has killed 
her child through abortion. The first step in 
the healing process is for her to accept the 
forgiveness for this crime against herself 
and her unborn child. 

It is my hope that today you will honestly 
look at what abortion is and deal with 
whatever effect it has had on your life. A 
dead baby is the choice being offered by the 
pro-choice side, not a re-established 
menstrual period, removed tissue or a conve- 
nient end to a social problem. 

On this Roe vs. Wade anniversary, why not 
do something for all the women and unborn 
children victimized by this crime'' Educate 
yourselves and speak up for what you know 
in your heart is right. 

Tim Indian in a Junior in prf law and builnr** adminitlri- 

tiw. 



Pro: Women must be allowed choice 



In the landmark case, Roe vs. Wade, the 
Supreme Court gave pregnant women the 
Constitutional right to choose whether or not 
to have an abortion Therefore, those women 
who do choose abortion over pregnancy are 
protected under the law. 

Before any debate of the sensitive issue of 
abortion can be undertaken, it is of the ut- 
most importance for people to understand 
the law. I think this is where many 
misconceptions about abortion are formed 

In the first trimester - or first three mon- 
ths — of a woman's pregnancy, the states 
cannot regulate or ban abortion if a woman 
chooses to have one. 

In the second trimester — the fourth 
through sixth months — the states can 
regulate, but not ban, abortion to protect the 
woman's health. So depending on the case, 
even if the woman chooses to have an abor- 
tion, she may not be able to do so legally at 
this stage of her pregnancy. If her health is 
at risk, she will then be allowed the abortion. 

In the third trimester - the seventh 
through ninth months — the states can 
regulate or ban abortion unless the woman's 
life or health is threatened. It is at this point 
— abortion in the third trimester — where in- 
formation on the realities about abortion 
often becomes twisted, underhanded and 
simply not true. 

Recently, a vocal opponent of abortion in 
Manhattan cited a hypothetical, if not com- 
pletely unrealistic, example of his view of the 
abortion law. He proposed that a man could 
insert a knife into the womb of a woman who 
has gone to full term in her pregnancy, cut 
the baby to shreds and be protected under 
the law for his act. 

To accentuate his example, this opponent 
of abortion points out that this hypothetical 
woman would have delivered a healthy baby 
the next day if she hadn't let this man stick a 
knife in her womb and cut the baby to shreds. 

First of all, it is illogical and untrue il- 
lustrations like this that perpetuate the myth 




PATTI 
PAXSON 

Collegian 
Columnist 



that this scenario could legally occur in the 
United States. As stated above, the law clear- 
ly spells out that no abortion can take place 
in the third trimester of a woman's pregnan- 
cy unless the woman's life or health is 
threatened. There is no law in America that 
protects a man who cuts up a fetus in the 
womb of a woman who, as is the case of this 
hypothetical woman, will deliver within a 
24-hour period. 

It is medically agreed that it is not until the 
third trimester that the fetus first becomes 
viable, or able to survive outside the womb. 
It is because of this that the abortion law 
allows the state to override the decision of 
any woman to have an abortion during her 
third trimester, unless her life or health is 
threatened. 

And indeed, it is extremely rare that a 
woman must have an abortion in her third 
trimester in order to save her life. In fact, in 
1961. less than I percent of all abortions oc- 
curred at 21 weeks of pregnancy or later. 

It is also important to point out that of the 
approximately 1.6 million American women 
who had abortions in 1981 , 96 percent of them 
did so within 15 weeks, or just after the first 
trimester point. This indicates to me that the 
overwhelming majority of the women who 
choose to have an abortion do so with the 
greatest concern for the stage of develop- 
ment of the fetus 

At the point when the fetus is able to sur- 
vive outside the womb — at about the onset of 
the third trimester — the pregnancy, as I 



pointed out, is approached much more sen- 
sitively and strictly by the law and most 
women. But before the third trimester, a 
heated debate exists whether or not the fetus 
is a person. 

In fact, those opponents of abortion who 
call themselves "pro-life'* go as far to say 
that the fertilized egg is a person and thus 
should be saved at all costs. If this is so, then 
I ask : Since biologists say one of every three 
fertilized eggs never becomes implanted 
against the uterine wall, but is passed 
through a woman's monthly menstruation, 
then what is to be done with all these so- 
called "babies?" 

Also, I do not understand how these op- 
ponents of legalized abortion can call 
themselves "pro-life" when in their opposi- 
tion to legalized abortion they are in reality 
supporting the murder of hundreds of women 
at the hands of illegal, back-alley abor- 
tionists. In 1970, before abortion was legal, 
109 women died as a result of abortions per- 
formed on them. In 1981, eight years after 
legalization, only seven abortion-related 
deaths occurred. 

In this land of freedom for every citizen, I 
find it appalling, as do most women, to have 
pregnancy imposed on women if they are un- 
fit, not ready or physically unable to main- 
tain a pregnancy and a subsequent child. I 
see no laws binding or restricting men to 
such a degree — they are as responsible for 
the pregnancy as the woman is. 

The choice must remain in the hearts of 
women where this sensitive issue is concern- 
ed. I do say, however, that a woman should 
avoid abortion at all costs. 

But for the very poor woman, the 14-year- 
old girl, the rape victim, the incest victim, 
the woman who is losing her life and many 
others, abortion must remain an option for 
them. There is already too much suffering in 
this country to pass it on to an unwanted 
child or a child that will simply not be loved 
or cared for. 



Letters 



Cecil needs help 

Editor. 

As the president-elect of the Manhattan 
chapter of the National Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Comic Strip 
Animals, I have a professional obligation to 
appeal to the students of this university and 
community on behalf of our friend, Cecil the 
dog i co-star of the Collegian comic strip 
"Life and Times.") 

Records indicate that Cecil, who at birth 
weighed a remarkable 4,521 pounds, became 
a street dog in New York City in hopes that 
having to dogfight for every morsel of Chuck 
Wagon, with or without gravy, he could stifle 
his obesity, but it was not to be. A meat -and 
potatoes dog. he even became a vegetarian 
for a while — he was that desperate. 

Most unfortunately, things only got worse. 
An evil family, notorious throughout the East 
Coast region for operating a gullible-dog 
racket , tied him to the bumper of a car bound 



for the Midwest after coaxing him with a 
plastic, sirloin-scented fire hydrant that they 
purchased from a questionable mail-order 
outfit. 

Cecil soon became the world's first truly 
aerodynamic dog after successfully com- 
pleting the distance at highway speeds 
without touching the pavement. But at 
slower city speeds, the scenario was not so 
glamorous, nor the sight pretty. Clinging on 
tighter than the leading plastic wrap while 
being unrelentlessly dragged across rough 
surfaces, he secretly hoped to hit an oil slick 
head-on to help him glide easier but, in fact, 
never did. 

It is for these reasons that Cecil has no bel- 
ly and looks the way he does. He can't help it 
if he looks like a walking drumstick or two 
heavily used Brillo pads fused together. The 
poor pup is not even sure whether he has one 
head or two, and to subject him to public 
scrutiny in his condition is ruthless and 



cruel, and one can bet Cecil doesn't like it 
either. 

.Inhn Yancey 
fifth vr-ar seninr in architecture 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

pertaining to matters of public interest 
are encouraged All letters must be 
typewritten or neatly printed and 
signed by the author and should not 
exceed 300 words The author's major, 
classification or other identification 
and a telephone number where the 
author can be reached during business 
hours must be included. The Collegian 
reserves the right to edit letters 

Letters may be brought to Kedzie 1 16 
or mailed to the Collegian Editorial 
Page Editor. Kedzie 103, Kansas State 
University, Manhattan, Kan. 66506 



^mmmmmm 



KANSAS STATI COLLEGIAN, ThurxUy, J»nuwy 22, 1SS7 



Norton 



. Continued from Page l 

equality of race has been the biggest 
obstacle," she said. "In a land where 
hard work and white skin was the 
assurance of prosperity for millions, 
race — not class — has been one of its 
most intra nsierit barriers. Nowhere 
else in the world has the struggle in 
this issue been so intense, so 
dynamic, so costly," 

Norton said the United States is the 
only nation today which has been so 
strongly influenced by black 
America, 

"Martin Luther King Jr. influenc- 
ed this country as much as John F. 
Kennedy, but it took us three tor- 
turous centuries to put our changes 
in equality into action." 

She said the progress that has been 
achieved is the hope for "ridding 
ourselves of the last remnants of 
racial division." 

In a press conference before her 
speech, Norton spoke about other 
areas of equality including sex and 
age discrimination. 

"I think the stereotyping of age has 
become worse than any other form of 
discrimination," she said. "People 
need to realize that the bulk of the 
population is now heading toward old 
age and that every 'body' bom now is 
needed, which is why the improve- 
ment in education is currently so im- 
portant." 

Norton also stressed the impor- 
tance of remembering the peaceful 
methods of King's work. 

"By remembering King, we are 
not dwelling in the past; it is a 
positive omen that we are 
remembering him," she said. "Mar- 
tin Luther King Jr. is a man to whom 
this country owes everything." 

Party leader 
apologizes in 
racial dispute 

By The Associated Press 

CAPE TOWN, South Africa - The 
leader of the mixed-race House of 
Parliament on Wednesday apologiz- 
ed to President P.W. Botha for swim- 
ming at a "whites only" beach. The 
apology by Labor Party leader Alan 
Hendrickse averted a crisis that 
Botha said could have led to the 
dissolution of Parliament. 

Botha made the letter public at a 
news conference. The president said 
he had told Hendrickse he must 
apologize or be dismissed as a 
Cabinet member and head of the 
council of ministers in the House of 
Representatives. 



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Ferguson plans to retire 
as manager of facilities 



By JOLA MURPHY 
Collegian Reporter 



The University will soon be forming a 
committee to find a replacement for 
Fred Ferguson, general manager of 
physical facilities, who will be retiring at 
the end of May. 

The 64-year-old Ferguson, who has 
been general manager for more than six 
years, said the physical facilities system 
was unorganized before he arrived at 
K-State — a problem he has since rec- 
tified. 

"I feel we've accomplished many 
things in the past six years," Ferguson 
said. "Everything is now organized and 
systemitized." 

George Miller, vice president of ad- 
ministration and finance, said Ferguson 
will be missed. 

"He has done an outstanding job," 
Miller said. "He is very receptive to the 
needs of the administration. He is a fair 
but firm person. It's that kind of exper- 
tise that is appreciated by all." 

At K-State, Ferguson has been respon- 
sible for maintenance and operation of 
all campus facilities including buildings, 
grounds, power and postal service. 

Ferguson said he has made many 
changes since he assumed the position 
six years ago. 

"Before I came here, we (the facilities 
department) went to all the departments 
and asked each department head what 
they needed us to do as far as 
maintenance is concerned," Ferguson 
said. "As a result, we got requests that 
were impossible for us to follow through 
with. We then spent the whole year trying 
to explain why we didn't do what they 
wanted." 

Ferguson said his department now 
follows the budget closely and deter- 
mines what work needs to be done in 
each building, and then if a department 
knows of a project that should have a 
higher priority, it is considered. 

As a result, Ferguson said the system 
runs more efficiently, and this allows his 
department to spend more time improv- 
ing the physical appearance of the 
University, 

Ferguson also said another problem he 
encountered when he came to K-State 
was a poor painting schedule for Univer- 
sity facilities. 

"When 1 came here, I was told we had 
an 18-year painting cycle which means 



that we get around to painting every 
room on campus about every 18 years," 
he said. "Now we have cyclic crews who 
continually paint on a five-year schedule. 
Now all the rooms are painted approx- 
imately every eight years, which I con- 
sider an acceptable length of time." 

Ferguson said he feels he is responsi- 
ble for a 16 percent reduction in the 
University's energy consumption. 

"This is quite remarkable because the 
University keeps adding space and 
equipment, and the energy consumption 
is still being reduced," Ferguson said, 
"At one time, there was only one main 
computer on campus, but now there are 
thousands." 

In the past two years, the facilities 
department has received more than 
$294,000 in federal and state grant money 
to fund the department in its drive for 
energy efficiency and conservation. 

"The money can be used for several 
different things, but one of the first pro- 
jects will be in Ackert Hall," Ferguson 
said. "We will be converting the current 
air conditioning system into a high- 
efficiency system for less energy con- 
sumption." 

The department has also contracted 
utility consultants, who periodically in- 
spect and advise the department on 
energy efficiency. 

Ferguson says it has been a great 
revelation for him to learn how the 
education system works, and he has a 
totally different attitude about how a 
university is put together and what 
makes it run smoothly. 

"I thoroughly enjoyed my work and 
my environment," Ferguson said. 
"There have been differences but 
nothing significant, I had a difficult time 
adjusting to the state being so deeply in- 
volved in the department, but I over- 
came (that) quickly. 1 feel I have done 
my job well." 

Ferguson plans to return to Colorado 
with his wife, Maxine, after his retire- 
ment. He said he is an avid gardener and 
enjoys painting and photography. 

He earned bachelor's degrees in elec- 
trical engineering from the University of 
Colorado-Denver and in liberal studies 
from the University of Oklahoma. 

A search committee to find a replace- 
ment for Ferguson is still in the planning 
stages. Donald Rathbone, dean of the 
College of Engineering, will chair the 
committee. 




Staff Sieve Rasmussen 



Fred Ferguson, general manager of physical facilities, will retire in May after six years at K-Siale. He 
will move to Colnrado and work on hobbies including painting, a sample of which is in the background. 



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LIFT OFF '87 

A Leadership Conference 
for Renewing Motivation in Student Groups 

Speakers: Dr. Walter Woods 
Mr. Steve Martin 
Dr. Pat Bosco 
Dr. David Mugler 

January 24, 1987 

9 a.m. -Noon 

Big 8 Room 

K-State Union 

Presented by: 

Ag Student Council 





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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thursday, January 22, 1987 



Beastie Boys album 
raps with brash style 



By ANDRE KKI I r Y 
Collegian Reviewer 

As anyone knows, there is very 
little "good" rap music out there. 
In the last few years, groups such 
as Run DMC and the Fat Boys 
have brought it more to public at- 
tention and even to many white 
radio markets. But the Beastie 
Boys have had the reputation for 
being notoriously bad (in the 
classic sense) ever since their in- 
ception. 



eview 



The reasons are simple. They 
have weak vocals; they make 
constant references to beer and 
young girls, and (even more than 
Prince) they are completely full 
of themselves. However, their 
newest album "Licensed to til" 
shows that there may actually be 
a diamond in the rough. 

Though still full of the same 
ear-banging boastful brashness 
they've always been known for, 
the Beastie Boys have always in- 
fused a hefty dose of heavy metal 
to spice up their otherwise loud 
and abrasive style. Nowhere can 
this be better heard than on their 
current single "You Gotta Fight 
(For The Right To Party)." Bet- 
ter than the Run DMC/Aerosmith 
collaboration "Walk This Way." 
(his is the ultimate in rock 'n' rap 
joining. 

For a good laugh, the car 
toonish cut "Girls" sounds very 
much like the background for a 



Bugs Bunny short. "Brass 
Monkey" is totally pointless but 
also fun in that it puts one in the 
mind of Bob Dylan rapping with a 
drum machine. 

The best cut by far is "New 
Style.'' It's loud, imaginative, un- 
predictable, somewhat clever 
and, like the rest of the LP, you 
don't even see the fancy 
mouthwork coming from these 
three "rapateers." By the middle 
of this tune, the song is inter- 
rupted by a crazed "Let me clear 
my throat!" then it breaks down 
into an outrageous reggae free- 
for-all that is sure to take you off 
guard. 

Any band that works this hard 
at being this bad ■■ in either sense 
of the word > and can still hold an 
urban-contemporary feeling has 
got to have talent somewhere. 
With the Beastie Boys, it's either 
their lyrics, their arrangements 
or simply their unique brand of 
unequaled and loud irreverance 
to both musical styles that spawn- 
ed them 

While constantly referring to 
themselves as "brothers" and 
chanting about beer, this is exact- 
ly the kind of band that parents 
love to hate and this, in the final 
analysis, makes them good rock 
'n' roll. 

Like Prince, this band can turn 
out some stuff that anyone can 
hate but also is never 
uninteresting It's now official. 
Heavy-metal and rap have finally 
married, and like it or not, these 
wonderous boys of wit, the 
Beastie Bovs, are the result. 



KCC recommends bus route reduction 



By KR1STI BARANCIK 
Collegian Reporter 



The proposed cut of several Kan- 
sas bus routes by Trailways Lines 
Inc. has been looming over travelers 
since August, but so far no total 
abandonment of any of the routes has 
resulted. 

The proposal would allow 
Trailways to cut service to 62 cities 
in Kansas. Twenty-two of the 62 
at it's have access to other bus lines, 
but 40 cities would be left with no bus 
service at all. 

Trailways' lack of profitability on 
the Kansas routes is the cause for the 
proposed cuts, said Dave Owsley, 



Trailways district manager for the 
Kansas City area. 

The Kansas Corporation Commis- 
sion, which handles rate cases in the 
interest of the public, recommended 
Tuesday that Trailways retain most 
of those routes. The KCC believes 
these routes be reduced but not cut. 

"Our proposal retains some form 
of service to all 40 of those com- 
munities," said Steve Menaugh, KCC 
director of information, 

Trailways will appeal the KCC 
recommendation to the Interstate 
Commerce Commission, and the ICC 
has 90 days to review the case and 
make the final decision. 

The ICC will most likely overrule 



the KCC recommendations, 
Menaugh said. 

The only change occurring in Kan- 
sas so far is the reduction of service 
from two runs a day to one run a day 
on two routes. The services that have 
been affected are the Kansas City, 
Mo., to Joplin and Wichita to Lincoln, 
Neb., routes. 

The proposed cuts have not af- 
fected the Junction City or Manhat- 
tan stops, said Vivian Bruce, assis- 
tant manager for Trailways Bus 
System in Junction City. 

Junction City will not be notified of 
any permanent schedule changes un- 
til after February, Bruce said. 

Owsley said the nationwide route 



cuts have had a small effect on Kan- 
sas travelers. 

The two routes that now only run 
once a day may not be as convenient 
for all riders, but at least the routes 
are still available, he said. 

"Obviously, you are not going to 
have all of the products that all of the 
customers want," Owsley said. 
"Some ridership will be hurt, but it 
won't be significant." 

Many travelers are concerned 
about how the bus fare rates will be 
affected by the scheduling changes. 

"If anything, (the limited service) 
will hold the passengers' cost down 
because the routes are not un- 
profitable anymore," Owsley said. 



Senate to discuss 3 percent charge, 
2-term student body president bill 



By The Collegian Staff 



Student Senate will meet this even- 
ing to discuss a resolution objecting 
to the 3 percent service charge on all 
sales transactions of the three 
student -owned agencies: the Union, 
Lafene Student Health Center and 
Student Publications Inc. 

The resolution encourages the 
directors of the agencies to adjust 
the proposed charges with the 
University based on a prior agree- 
ment and services provided between 
the University and the agencies, said 
Steve Milligan, graduate student in 



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chemical engineering and sponsor of 
the resolution. 

The resolution also recommends 
that the proposed charges be 
withheld until an agreement is 
reached between the University ad- 
ministration and the agenices. 

Student Senate will explore 
measures to arrange the service 
charge as a temporary measure and 
to arrange an independanl audit of 
the three University agencies in 
order to account for the actual value 
of the services, the resolution slates 

Milligan said the resolution is 



fT'N'TI 

Happy Hour 

4-7 p.m. 
3 Tacos for $ 1 
99C Margaritas 

CCflON 

418 Poyntz 

D owntow n 

Exxxxxn 



basically a statement of objections to 
the administration while supporting 
the agency directors. 

Senate will also hear a bill spon- 
sored by Student Body President 
Steven Johnson and the Senate Ex- 
ecutive Committee allowing a stu- 
dent body president to seek a second 
term. 

A vote on Bill -30 concerning stu- 
dent representation will also take 
place. If the bill is passed, an ad hoc 
committee will be established to 
research student representation 
enhancement. 




. . . Rood Collegian Ads! 

Collegian advertising gives you the 
news on everything from store sales 
and grand openings to meeting times 
lor many KStale events! 






• 13 Varieties of Submarine Sandwiches 

•Grilled Philadelphia Steak Sandwiches 

12th & Moro • Aggieville 

DIMEIN • CARRYOCJT 



V 



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-*// 



If 



Vf- C 



n 



fry <fe 

A PHI ALPHA THETA LECTURE 
"The Presidential Libraries" 

Delivered In 

Dr. John YViikman, Director 

The Dwight David Eisenhower Presidential Library 

Thursday, January 22, 1987 
Union 205, 2:30 p.m. 

Win With Roosevelt & Truman 



n 



n 



n 




Cathy, our bored student, has decided to take up volunteer work After 
researching a variety of agencies, she chose the Fone Crisis Center. At 
the Fone, she can help others through their tough times, and by doing 
so, she is helping to increase her own morale. She's not bored 
anymore, either If you'd like to join Cathy, please call 532-6565 
immediately Training begins soon. 



\= 



Sponsored by the Fone Crisis Center 



Are You Losing The Battle 
Of The Books Already? 

Then Take A Break At 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN 

BONKERS 

TONIGHT 

$1.50 

Mixed 
Drinks 




UPC 



Thursday, January 22, 1987 

For more information on any jJPC event, call 532-6751 



, 









fl k-state union 

Jupc aria 











"■■>*•. 






' 




. 



Midday Arts 

Tai-Chi 

A demonstration 

ol un oriental 
Performing An 
by Lee-Shih Wu 
Wednesday, 
January 28 at 
noon in the 
Union 
Courtyard. 



BESaJ? 



Art Rentals 

Neat something la 
brighten up those 
drab wiills'.' Rent an 
Artwork for only 
S» I -3 a semester 

from the UPC Ans 
Commiitcc Rentals. 
Available Tuesday 
January 27 & Wed- 
nesday, January 28 
10 a.m. -3 p.m. in 
the K Stale Union 
Coiirivard. 




Photography 
Contest 



I tiki (I)l' 12th Annual t It' l1ioii>^raph\ Ciiiiil'm. Inhinimunri ^nd 

i c*si rule* availuMi! beginning Munday, Jonwtr) 2ft in (he Unkw 

Alliums Center, 'id limn. K Siuic Uiimn. Entries accepted 

MarlinB Mumtay. Fi'hruiin Irylrtdii), February 2^ Cash priA's 
will he eiveii 




"A terriflie^inlavle*' 9 

—Gene Stekei, CBS-TV, Chicago 

"About last 
night.? 



£**£ I) I! I. I> H I 



ArTUolUllLLlASf. 
(DlUe TtMwnrtun* tot. All «l(jm«n«-»rt. I 



Brat Packers, Rob Lowe and Demi Moore star in this humorous look at 
today \s dating scene. They are the reluctant lovers who try to build a serious 
relationship out of a one night stand. 

Forum Hall, Fri <S Sat., 7 & 9:30p.m. 
$1.75, KSU ID required. 

fljji k-state u nion 



upc feature films 



"A STUNNER! 

HUONEMuVAJNCWmi 

UUGHTtt. HORROR 

AND DtSKUEFI" 



— rim it 

IT Had 







V 



'/"v.3 



MJlMIS. 



OF THE SHREW 



A come honor dncunsenijry Prim mil 
serv*i up the dirk SKtf ol CoM War 

AmeritJ in it its parjnoi* and cantor 
oiism Today Little Iheatre 3 30 o m t 
Forum Mil 7 30 o m 



$1.75, 
KSU ID required 



The Franco ZeflireHi directed adaptation of Ihe Shakespearean tale 
ot love, marriage and equality The film stars Elizabeth Taylor and 
Richard Burton Part of the Shakespeare Festival Forum Hall, 
Mon 8 Tues , Jan. 26 A 27. 7 p m. 



GET INVOLVED ON CAMPUS WITH THE ONION PROGRAM COUNCIL 

Volunteers Wanted: Individuals interested in serving lor the 87 88 year as committee chairs 10 coordinate social, 
recreational, educational and cultural programs lor the benefit of the KSU community 

Onion Program Council is a sludent volunteer organization consisting of approximately 1 00 students who select, plan 
and promote 500 programs (films, trips, entertainers and more) each academic year. UPC is broken up into nine 
committees Promotions. Travel, Special Events, Outdoor Recreation. Kaleidoscope Films. Issues and Ideas. Feature 
Films. Eclectic Entertainment, Arts. 

President -Presides ottl the UPC tsecutive Council Hit un the Union Governing Uoatd coordinates events and act.mie* thai WltM lh» lolal UPC 

membership Our hitihrtt leade'ship position 

Arts— t rordroale* Union Ail Gallery e»hibitots print sales an renlals Ihe Ails and Oolts sale ihe Photo tnnlesl and Mid Dts MM 

Eclectic Enleilalnman I — provides Ihe besl In live entertainment. professional ■ omtdtfu wiqm and student enlettainFTM.nl 

limes and Ideas-Srirus oiu.am«* and pubi.. w In imn hiuhliqhiinn cuneni event* 01 popular lopies o) mieresl Qroarwe* ihr let s Talk About II 

series 

Kaleidoscope Films- fleets and put) I it i«s innovative artistic and iletnaliona m on Wednesdays and Ihuisdaysm the Union Ihev alvjshow week-end 

ma linrr* and midnight litms 

Outdoor Becreallon- Otters a widr- vanel» ot ouidooi related tup-, and pn>g'ams based on a cooperative wilderness adventure structure 

Travel - C nor. (males and imt.i M . . . - N .nier and spnnq break nips lor Ihe K Slate community Sells an International Sludent ID i aid and maintains a F ravel 

kesoutie Cenlei 

Feature Film*— Selects and publicises popular lilms every Friday and Saturday ntqhl lath* Union They also show weekend malmees and midnnihl dims 

Special Event*— Selecls inordinate* and public in* desired events or acliviltes lhat do not lad under areolhei commillee aiea MM ttta laOTUH the 

Acholics Carnival Lair Nujhl at the K Slate Union and some types ol live enterlatnment 

pyomolions- Deals with Itit- tftMal 'mage ol Ihe rntire rouni it Pastes up Ci>llei|r«n ads Publishes the Procrrarwnei calender and oilier public alions Id 

promote tipr 

Applications for Leadership (Committee Chairs) are available beginning Wednesday, January 21. Deadline: 4 p m., 

Friday. February 6th. 

Applications may be picked up and submitted in the Activities Center. 3rd Hoor of the K State Union. For more 

information, call 532 6571 




'Explosive' Suggs sets record 



By JEFF RAPP 
Sports Writer 



Coming off a redshirt season that 
has given her time to hone her skills 
and increase her strength, three 
time All-American shot putter 
Pinkie Suggs is ready to give 
K-State's women's track team a 
scoring punch during her last 
season as a Wildcat. 

After one meet — the Nebraska 



Invitational Jan. 17 in Lincoln — 
Suggs has already posted a school 
and a personal record in the shot 
put this season with a throw of 53-1 
1/4. Suggs won that meet and 
qualified for the NCAA Indoor 
Championships slated for March. 

Suggs, a fifth-year senior, said 
she plans to better her perfor- 
mances while the season pro- 



"I don't know, (my peformance) 



just came easy to me," Suggs said. 
"Usually, I never pick up where I 
left off. I usually have a setback 
and have to build back up to it, but 
this year I started off where I left 
off. Now, it's just a matter of me 
taking that and going further." 

K-State's track coaching staff 
collectively decided to redshirt 
Suggs last season to give her 
another year to progress from a 
great athlete to a potentially super 




SUM/ Brad Famhier 

K -Slate shot putter Pinkie Suggs, in her first outing after being redshirted last season, broke her own school 
record and qualified for the national meet with a throw of S3 feet, J 1/4 inches last Saturday at the Nebraska In- 
vitational. 



athlete. 

Assistant coach Scott Bennett, 
who worked with Suggs last year, 
said she had a few problems with 
her throwing technique before. 
Those flaws have been corrected 
and now she's ready to compete 
with the best. 

"Now, I can see the best of both 
worlds in Pinkie," Bennett said. 
"She's smooth, she's quick, and 
she's very explosive I think you're 
going to see that her marks are go- 
ing to nowhere but up and up as the 
season goes on." 

Bennett said Suggs accentuated 
her weight lifting program during 
her redshirt season. Throwing 
coach Ray Hansen, a former 
Wildcat trackster, reinforced Ben- 
nett's statement with facts and 
figures. 

Hansen said Suggs can bench 
press 270 pounds, squats 365 pounds 
and can snatch 180 pounds above 
her head. The 180 pounds is more 
than all but two members of the 
men's track team can snatch. 

Suggs' strength allowed her to 
place first in nine meets during her 
junior season in 1985. She earned 
four firsts throwing discus, and in 
June of that year she placed 10th 
overall in the NCAA finals in the 
shot put 

With her physical stature 
<5-foot-9, 210 pounds) and 
numerous athletic achievements, 
Suggs could probably bully and 
rag. According to her coaches, the 
only thing showcasing her talent is 
her actual performance in the field 
events. 

"A lot of jumpers and throwers, 
from an outward appearance, can 
be very bubbly and bouncy and 
wired,'' Bennett said. 

"She's real low-key But when it 
comes to the right time of ex- 
ploding, she's got that capability. 
Sometimes you can't judge a book 
by its cover," he added. 

Bennett said what makes Suggs a 
good athlete is her ability to adapt 
to various coaching techniques 

"I think another thing of her per- 
sonality is that she's very easygo- 
ing and she listens. All good 
athletes that 1 find can listen to 
what a coach says, and have the 
ability to make their body do (what 
the coach says) just from either a 
verbal cue or a visual cue," Ben- 
nett said. 

Hansen and Bennett have worked 
with Suggs on improving her speed 
during her approach to throw 

"Pinkie has always been slow in 
the past in the ring. She hasn't had 
the speed, so the first thing she's 
done is to get aggressive," Hansen 
said. 

"She's got the strength. She's had 
the strength since high school. In 
fact, she was stronger in high 
school than she is now," he said. 

Hansen said the reason Suggs 
was redshirted was that "one year 
of maturity makes a big 
difference." At first, Suggs didn't 
agree. 

"I thought it wouldn't because I 
didn't really work out as hard as I 
should have," Suggs said. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thursday, January 22, 1987 - 7 

Mascot encourages 
fans to cheer 'Cats 



Bring on the 'Cats! 

Well, sports fans, welcome back to 
K -State and an exciting semester of 
classes and Wildcat basketball. By 
now everyone should have attended 
all of their classes at least once and 
two or three basketball games. A 
good rule of thumb to follow : attend 
at least as many classes as basket- 
ball games. It works for me. 

I hope everyone had a great 
Christmas vacation. The 
cheerleaders and I traveled to 
Nashville and Kansas City to cheer 
on the 'Cats. After losing to No. 
2-ranked North Carolina, we've roll- 
ed up five straight wins and have 
showed signs of being Big Eight Con- 
ference title contenders. The Lady 
Cats are also piling up victories 
toward a successful season. 

I see the conference race as being 
wide open, with Oklahoma, Kansas 
and K -State getting off to good starts 
Missouri and Iowa State will be close 
behind as Oklahoma State, Nebraska 
and Colorado act as spoilers. Look 
for at least four teams from the Big 
Eight to make the NCAA tourna- 
ment. 

It's been good to see the Big Eight 
get some national press coverage 
lately. Sports Illustrated ran a 
feature on Missouri's Derrick 
Chievous and a smaller article on 
Norris Coleman's return to the 'Cats 
and Ahearn Field House. With non- 




WILLIE 

THE 

WILDCAT 

Guest 

Columnist 



conference games against North 
Carolina, North Carolina State, 
Notre Dame, Louisville, St. John's, 
Temple and UNLV, the Big Eight 
can hopefully break away from the 
football conference stereotype. 

Are we having fun yet at those 
home games? If not, go see a doctor ; 
something is wrong. And how about 
the television coverage? Every time 
I turn around some camera has a lit- 
tle blinking red light saying, "Hey, 
Willie, you have 10 seconds to make 
150,000 people happy. Go for it! " 

Everyone who has attended the 
games deserves a pat on the back — 
you've shown great support. Satur- 
day is the last weekend home game 
this season. That means only one 
thing — road trip! 

In case you haven't noticed, I'm 
having a blast at the games even if 
the other mascots are afraid to show 
up. Keep up the excitement, and let's 
keep K-State basketball at the top of 
the Big Eight See you Saturday! 



Oakland reunites stars 
for '87 baseball season 



By The Associated Press 

OAKLAND. Calif. - Pitcher Vida 
Blue, a major figure in Oakland's 
glorious 1970s, made an emotional 
return to the A's Wednesday, and 
was welcomed by Reggie Jackson, 
who also has come home again 

"I really want to shed some tears, 
because i really am elated." said 
Blue, 37. "I'm really excited about 
getting the chance to play for the A's 
again." 

The A's announced Blue's signing 
to a one-year contract at a news con- 
ference. 

Blue and Jackson, 40, are the only 
players still active who were promi- 
nent members of the A's rosters dur- 
ing the team's championship years. 
The club won five consecutive 
American League West titles from 
1971 to 1975 and won the World Series 
in 1972, 1973 and 1974. 

"It has a lot of sentimental mean- 
ing to me to come back and to get No. 
14," Blue said. 

Despite the emotion behind the 
return of Blue and Jackson, both said 
they came back because they believe 
they can help the team 

"The important thing to me is 
here's a guy who can still 
contribute," Jackson said after the 
conference. "I look at a guy return- 
ing as a friend, but this guy's going to 
contribute a lot to the ballclub and 
the fans." 

Jackson rejoined the A's four 
weeks ago as a free agent. 



"That burning desire is still with 
me to compete on a big league 
ballclub," said Blue, who appeared 
in 28 games for the San Francisco 
Giants last season, compiling a 3.27 
earned run average and 10-10 record. 

Manager Tony La Russa, once an 
Oakland teammate of Blue and 
Jackson, said the primary reason the 
A's went after the pitcher was 
because the team needed a left- 
handed starting pitcher. 

"Our main intent is having him 
join our starting rotation." La Russa 
said 

The A's were short on left-handed 
pitchers last season, both in their 
starting rotation and in the bullpen, 
and Blue could help the team in 
either area. 

Blue began a comeback with the 
Giants as a reliever in 1985 after 
missing the 1984 season because of 
drug-related problems. 

Blue, Catfish Hunter. Ken 
Holtzman, Rollie Fingers and Darold 
Knowles were the top pitchers during 
the As championship years. Jackson 
was at the heart of a batting order 
that also included Bert Campaneris, 
Sal Bando. Joe Rudi. Gene Tenace 
and Dick Green 

Hunter, reached at his farm in 
North Carolina, responded to the 
news of Blue's return by saying, 
"I'm too old to go back." But the pit- 
cher voted into the Hall of Fame last 
week said no one has asked him late- 
ly if he would be interested in making 
a comeback at age 40, 



Lady Cats steal win, 71-61 



By CHASE CLARK 
" Sports Writer 



K-State's women's basketball team has 
found a "home away from home" in Col- 
orado, where the Lady Cats defeated the 
Lady Buffs, 77-61, Wednesday night for their 
third straight victory in Boulder. 

K-State, second in the conference race, has 
lost only one game in Boulder since it started 
playing there during the 1982-83 season. 

The Lady Cats, 14-3 overall and 3-1 in the 
Big Eight Conference, are off to one of their 
best starts ever. Only the 1980-81 Lady Cats, 
which was 15-2 after 17 games, have had a 
better starting record. 

That team, under the leadership of Coach 
Lynn Hickey, finished 23-11 and placed se- 
cond in the conference tournament. 

By winning five consecutive games and 
nine of their last 10, the Lady Cats have earn- 
ed the 25th spot in the latest Associated Press 



Sooners dump 
O-State, 94-67 

By The Associated Press 



NORMAN, Okla - Dave Sieger 
came off the bench to score 17 points, 
all but two of them from three-point 
range, as No. U Oklahoma beat 
Oklahoma State, 94-57, in Big Eight 
Conference basketball Wednesday 
night. 

The Cowboys played a deliberate 
style of offense throughout the game, 
but couldn't keep high-powered 
Oklahoma from breaking loose. 



poll. Two other Big Eight teams are ranked 
in the poll, Oklahoma is ranked 23rd and 
Missouri 22nd. The Lady Tigers are current- 
ly atop the standings in the Big Eight race. 

K-State built an 11 -point lead against Col- 
orado in the first half, but the Lady Buffs bat- 
tled back in the last five minutes of play and 
went into the locker room tied at 27-27. 

Sue Leiding led the Cats in scoring the first 
half with nine points. Carlisa Thomas, 
Tracey Bleczinski and Susan Green com- 
pleted the scoring with six points each. 

With seven rebounds, Thomas paced the 
team on the boards as the Lady Cats outre- 
bounded Colorado, 18-12, in the first half. And 
Thomas, with three fouls, was the only Lady 
Cat in foul trouble at intermission. 

Colorado came out strong in the second 
half and took its first lead of the game, 
building its margin to eight with less than 
seven minutes left in the game. 

The Lady Cats turned to the full-court 
press, created several key turnovers and 
regained the lead with less than five minutes 
left in the game. 

Behind the shooting of Bleczinski. Leiding 
and Green, the Cats outscored the Lady 
Buffs 25-9 in the last 6:03 and went on to win 
by 10, 71-61. 

Bleczinski paced the team in scoring with 
17 points — 11 in the second half. Green net- 
ted 16, Thomas scored 14 and Leiding hit 13. 
Rounding out the scoring for K-State was 
Theza Fitzpatrick with seven points and 
Janet Madsen with four. 

Thomas dominated the rebounding on both 
sides of the floor as she handled 16 boards in 
the game. Bleczinski had 11 rebounds of her 
own, Leiding grabbed eight, Madsen and 
Fitzpatrick had two each and Elyse Funk 
had one board in the game 

With her 16 rebounds, Thomas is only 12 
boards away from taking over as the all-time 
career rebounder at K-State. Thomas has 772 



boards in her four years on the squad — 170 
rebounds so far this season. 

K-State controlled the boards as it outre- 
bounded Colorado, 43-21. 

Hitting on 17 of 21 free throw attempts, the 
Lady Cats shot 81 .9 percent from the line and 
netted 44.3 percent from the floor — slightly 
below their 45.1 percent season average. 

Gretchen DeWitte paced Colorado in scor- 
ing with 15 points and rebounding with six 
boards. Tracy Tripp scored 14 points, Cheryl 
Woodford and Crystal Ford each hit 10. Erin 
Carson was held well below her 13.2 points 
per game average as she only netted eight 
points. 

Colorado shot 24 of 52 (46.1 percent) from 
the field and 13 of 17 (76.5 percent) from the 
charity stripe. 

K -Stale will return to action Saturday 
when it hosts the Kansas Lady Jayhawks at 
Ahearn Field House. Tip-off time is set for 5 
p.m. following the men's contest against 
Oklahoma. 



K-STATE 


MIS 


li. 


PT 


R 


F 


TP 


BLECZINSKI 


m 


6-10 


54 


11 


2 


17 


THOMAS 


3* 


413 


44 


1* 


4 


14 


LEIDING 


X 


8-13 


M 


• 


3 


13 


GREEN 


2t 


HI 


4-5 





3 


II 


FITZPATRICK 


M 


3-5 


1-1 


) 


2 


7 


Smith 


1 


0-0 


0-0 











MuiIm-ii 


4 


2-4 


0-0 


3 





4 


Punk 


16 


0-1 


04 


1 


1 





Davidson 


4 


0-2 


04 





1 





1-ane 


2 


0-1 


04 


1 








ri.uii 




2741 


11-21 


41 


1* 


11 


CIII.IIR tIKI 


M1N 


ro 


FT 


R 


F 


TP 


DeWITTE 


34 


su 


3-1 


1 


2 


15 


LAMPHOS 


* 


04) 


0-1 


1 


1 





WWIDFORD 


It 


3-7 


4-* 


S 


2 


10 


WILSON 


a 


0-1 


04 


1 


I 





TRIPP 


a 


•■13 


M 


1 


1 


14 


Moore 


■ 


1-7 


04 


4 


3 


4 


Kosenski 


i 


04 


04 











Carson 


■ 


1-7 


M 


1 


1 


t 


Ford 


17 


4S 


M 





3 


10 


Starks 


4 


0-0 


04 











Totali 




14-S2 


13-11 


X2 


n 


•1 



Halflimr store K State 71, Colorado 27 
Turnovers K State 28 Colorado II 
Field goal percentage K Stale 44 3, Colorado 48 1 
Attendance «20 



'Cats pound Buffaloes 
to hold Big Eight lead 



By DAVE WAGNER 
Sports Writer 



K-State tied a school record with 60 
second-half points and maintained its 
outright conference lead with a 92-61 
pasting of Colorado in Boulder. 

The Wildcats remain the only 
undefeated team in the Big Eight after 
posting the 31-point win, extending their 
record to 13-3 overall and 3-0 in con- 
ference play. Colorado dropped to 6-10 
overall and 0-4 in the Big Eight. 

The 60 second-half points tied a school 
record set previously against Oklahoma 
State in 1975. 

Norris Coleman paced the 'Cats with 23 
points and nine rebounds. Three other 
K -Slaters scored in double figures. 

"Good performances by Coleman, 
(William) Scott and (Mitch) Richmond, 
got us back into the game in the second 
half,' 1 said K-State assistant coach Dana 
Altman. 

In the first half, K-State showed signs of 
lackluster play that had plagued the team 
in Saturday's game against Iowa State. 
Getting into foul trouble early in the 
game, the Wildcats circulated 10 players 
through their rotation in the first half. 

This situation hurt K-State, which saw 
its first-half lead, slowly but surely, slip 
from 10 points to a scant two points at 
halftime. The Buffaloes entered the 
locker room with a renewed vigor, and 
K-State was in a stupefied daze with only 
a 32-30 lead. 

Whatever Head Coach Lon Kruger said 
to his squad during the break between 



halves worked. 

It was the combination of Coleman, 
Richmond and Scott who showed the Col- 
orado crowd of 5,478 "the Kruger 's 'Cats 
of new." 

Coleman came off a lukewarm first-half 
performance where he collected 10 points 
and two fouls and scored 13 points to lead 
K-State in scoring. 

Richmond and Scott got their games 
back in order and scored in double figures 
with 17 and 15 points, respectively. Scott 
displayed a little bit of his dominance 
from three-point land and was three of 
four from beyond the line. 

In other Big Eight action, Oklahoma 
downed Oklahoma State 94-67 at Norman 
K-State hosts the Uth ranked Sooners at 
3:10 p.m Saturday 



K-STATE 


MIN 


FC 


FG-3 


FT 


R 


F 


TP 


RICHMOND 


2* 


10-17 


0-3 


1-2 


3 


1 


21 


COLEMAN 


27 


*H 


0-1 


5-7 





2 


23 


BLEDSOE 


11 


2-1 


04 


0-2 


S 


3 


4 


SCOTT 


27 


M 


3-4 


04 


2 


2 


IS 


HENSON 


34 


24 


l-l 


0-1 


S 


1 


5 


Meyer 


11 


2-1 


tH) 


04 


3 


4 


4 


Sim mora 


7 


34 


04 


l-l 


• 


1 


7 


Dobbins 


» 


44 


II 


1-1 


4 


2 


10 


Nelson 


is 


04 


04 


12 


1 





I 


Eddie 


i 


1-1 


04 


0-2 


I 


2 


2 


Tula Is 




3*4* 


t-10 


•-lit 


H 


a 


*2 


HOME TEAM 


MIN 


FG 


FG-J 


FT 


R 


F 


TP 


BECKER 


31 


24 


04 


04 


S 


I 


4 


BULLARD 


34 


4-11 


04 


3-4 


» 


4 


11 


WILKE 


29 


313 


04 


S4 


t 


1 


21 


COUNTRYMAN 


13 


1-3 


04 


04 


I 


1 


2 


PENIX 


30 


34 


1-3 


04 


1 


1 


7 


Vaughan 


• 


0-1 


04 


04 





3 





Robinson 


17 


3-5 


04 


34 


2 


I 


9 


Nash 


10 


1-3 


1-2 


04 


1 


I 


3 


Totals 




tJ-U 


2-3 


13-11 


32 


14 


•1 



Halftime score: K State 32, Colorado 30 

Turnovers K State It, Colorado Is 

Field goal percentage K State 57 3. Colorado 43 4 

Attendance i.m 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thursday, January 22, 1SS7 



ROTC grads face uncertain career options, Krimmer says 



By TOM MORRIS 
Collegian Reporter 



Maj. Richard J. Krimmer, assis- 
tant professor of military science, 
told K-Slate ROTC cadets there is an 
option to entering active military du- 
ty after graduation from college. 

Krimmer spoke following the 
ROTC Wildcat Battalion award 
ceremony Wednesday afternoon in 
the K-State Union Little Theatre 
Awards were presented to cadets 
based on their academic and 
military performance last semester. 

Because of government cutbacks, 
Krimmer said the military is reduc- 
ing the number of people who receive 
active duty, and many ROTC 
graduates are being turned down. 

According to Krimmer, the Na- 
tional Guard and the Army Reserve 
are acceptable options. 

"We need to show you how impor- 
tant it is to be a civilian soldier," 
Krimmer said. "We need quality 
people in the guard and reserves — 
doctors, lawyers, educators ..these 
are professional people who have 
chosen to serve their country in their 
own way." 

Krimmer said the ROTC has a 
tendency to "oversell active duty," 
but cadets should always apply for 
other full-time jobs as options to a 
full-time military career. 

"Things are only going to get 
worse, and if you haven't interview- 
ed for a job yet, that's your 
problem," Krimmer said. 

"You've got to keep your options 
open," he said. "Do not close any 
doors, don't close any openings and 
don't burn any bridges. 

"What I want is a citizen soldier 
who is dedicated to defending their 



country and, at the same time, is a 
leader in their community." 

Awards presented to cadets includ- 
ed the distinguished military student 
award, scholastic excellence and 
scholastic awards, commission rib- 
bons and color guard participation. 

Superior cadet awards, given to 
cadets for achieving the top position 
in their respective military science 
class, were presented to Richard R. 
Hanes, junior in mechanical 
engineering; Eugene S. Johnson, 
junior in pre-veterinary medicine; 
and Mary A. Strafuss, freshman in 
journalism and mass communica- 
tions. 

Distinguish^ Military Student Award 
Lisa C. Creighlon; John L. Hummer. Thomas 
W Lloyd. William A Martin; Eileen A. Mover. 
Michael L Rut i. Richard E Thorp; Douglas A 
Torok ; and Christopher J Wilson 
Scholastic Excellence Award il.SGPA or above I 
Bryant S Banes. Chad C Clem. Lisa C 
Creighlon: Michael L Coldsborough: Jeff M. 
Graef; Steven W. Hardin. Eugene S Johnson. 
Thomas W Lloyd; Robert A Pendergait . Ann L 
Reed, Lisa K Richards, and Michael L. Rutz. 
Scholastic Award 11.0 or above I 
Brian D Almquist; Dana S. Bradley; John K 
Caudill; Martin J Oannatl. Jesse D Galuan; 
Shannon K Gary; Kelly A Clew, Richard R 
Hanes; Gregory M. Haug, John L Hummer; 
Jerry M. Judy; James T. Knots man. Michael A. 
Kupsch; William A. Martin; Eileen A Meyer; 
John W Rueger; Rick .Sadat. Arnold K Smith. 
Michael R Smith; Dirt A Stapelton; Mary A 
Strafuss, Travis W Slrumpff Gina M Taylor; 
Douglas A. Torok; Brent A. York, and 
Esmeratdo Zarzatoal 

Com mend at km Ribbon 
Brian Almquist; Jacqueline Kelsey, Robert 
Pendergast; Uuiel Peeing. Michael Reth; 
William Schaefer; Jon Beam. Kelly Demel; 
Steven Hardin; John Rueger. and Douglass 
Skaggs 

Color Guard Participation 
Douglas Torok; Richard Hanes; Gerald Loft in; 
Walter Coleman; David Debacker. and Uiziel 
Pecina. 




Maj. Kit-hard J. Krimmer, assistant professor of military science, speaks to 
ROTC cadets following an awards presentation Wednesday in the Union Little 



Staff/ John La Barge 
Theatre. Krimmer spoke about the importance of joining the National Guard 
and Army Reserves as an option to active duly. 



Collegian Classifieds 
Cheap, but Effective 



Your gift can make 
a difference. 



<> 



American Heart 

Association 



WE'RE FIGHTING FORVOUR LIFE 



THE ICE CREAM 
* SOCIAL 



F ,' 



( WE'VE 
I MOVED 



to 



1439 Anderson 

Student Services Center 

Stop By And 
See Our New Store! 

537-7079 




AGGIEVILLE 
FLOWERS 

SHORT STEM ROSES 
$1 each 

CARNATIONS 
$7.50 per dozen 

12th & Laramie 
537-9549 

Mon.-Sai. 10 a.m. -5 p.m. 



Wash It In AGGIEVILLE 
at 

SPEEDWASH 

"Free Parking" 

Visit our back room 

for special prices. 



Open Sun.-Thurs. 

24 Hours Daily 

Fri.-Sat. 

4:30 a.m. -Midnight 

1118Moro 



Jan. 22, 1973 To Jan. 22. 1987 

* On Jan. 22, 1973, the United States Supreme Court 
declared unconstitutional all state laws protecting 
unborn children from abortion. 

* Today, after 20,000.000 procured abortions, the 
procedure remains legal in the United States through 
the nine months of pregnancy. 

On this fourteenth anniversary, 
KSU Students for Life 
remembers the many victims of abortion- 
children, women, and men— 
and affirms again our need 
to respect human life. 

KSU STUDENTS FOR LIFE 
"A QUIET VOICE FOR LIFE" 



"\ 






TONIGHT 

All 

Mixed Drinks 

$1.50 

Any name 
Any brand 



Sunset Grille 
Open daily 5-9 p.m. 

This Week's Special 
8 oz. Filet $4.95 

(price includes salad bar. 
put ui i ' & bread) 



Office: Bar: 

53*4321 539-9727 

531 N, Manhattan 



TAE KW0N DO KARATE 

Open-Free Demonstration 

Friday, Jan. 23, 6:30-8 p.m. 

Ahearn Gymnasium 

•Women: self-defense, lose and control weight, 
self-discipline 

• Children: self-defense, coordination, self-confidence 

• Men: self-confidence, top physical conditioning, 

self-defense, agility, and coordination 



Tuesday & Friday 

Classes Fee $42 

6:30-8 p.m. 

1 UG credit optional 




Instructed 

Register NOW! by 
call 532-5566 M f er 5 hae 

Sun Yi 
7th degree 
Black Belt 
Community Education 
Division of Continuing Education K*=**i 
Umberger Hall 317 



ICANBAB 



mcrvimx^T-ir 



MEN OF K-STATE 



CALENDARS 

on sale in the Union today & Friday 



••$♦ 



— n 



s 




IY^*. 



v-»*»^ "» 



Thompson Twins 
King lor a Day 



Sj.^^^^M^^ 



Ttath clean I ng from 120 



SAGER DENTAL ASSOCIATES, P. A. 

514 Humboldt Plaza H y g I • n t Department 913-537-8823 



_ 



ataMaMaVaMMaflaMMMaMaMataMMaaWall 



" 



•-V* . || 



KANSAS STATE CQLUQIAM. Ttiurwto y. Jliwmi »». <»7 






Groups select economics professor f^| afifi 2f 2 J^ 

to act as consumers' representative ^»*lcl SSI 1 1 COS 



By KRIN Ml'LCAHY 

Collegian Reporter 



A K State professor was recently 
selected to represent tKe rights of the 
consumer as a member of the na- 
tional Consumer Advisory Council. 

Richard L.D. Morse, professor of 
family economics, was one of seven 
new members elected to serve on the 
council for the next three years. 

Ten years ago, Congress created 
the Consumer Advisory Council to 
advise the Federal Reserve Board of 
the United States on a wide range of 
issues relating to consumer rights 
and responsibilities. 

The Federal Reserve Board usual- 
ly nominates 30 members each year, 
but this year there were only seven 
openings. Selection to the Consumer 
Advisory Council is based on 
nominations from various consumer 
interest groups and high-ranking of- 
ficials. 

Morse said he was nominated by 
the Kansas Consumer Credit Com- 
mission, U.S. Rep. Dan GHckman, 
D-Kan , and several other groups. 

The council meets three times a 
year at the Federal Reserve Board's 
headquarters in Washington, D.C., 
where Morse will attend his first 
meeting in mid-March. 

"This is just the first decade of the 
Consumer Advisory Council," Morse 



said. "You may question where the 
consumer's voice was before this 
time, and the fact is the consumer's 
voice was non-existent " 

Morse's area of special interest 
and expertise is in credit and savings 
from a consumer perspective. He 
said because he believes the average 
consumer does not understand sav- 
ings, he would like to do something to 
educate the consumer. 



'I don't run for public office, 
but I do have ideas. A 
university is an idea factory 
and the selling of ideas.' 

—Richard L.D. Morse 

"It is presumptuous of me to say 
I'm out in the street hearing what 
people say," Morse said, "I don't run 
for public office, but I do have ideas. 
A university is an idea factory and 
the selling of ideas 

"We have, by training and 
discipline, (the) ability to identify 
concerns people have who (they) 
themselves cannot identify." 

The Consumer Advisory Council 
establishes its own agenda of impor- 
tant issues to research by taking a 
poll among council members. Items 
of importance to the council now 
stem from bank closings toderegula- 



and Sinm? 



tion. 

Morse said a question now affec- 
ting Kansas and other states is the 
issue whether out-of-state banks can 
own Kansas banks. For example, 
Japanese corporations own three 
banks in California, Morse said. 

"We are faced with problems of 
change, maybe of greater opportuni- 
ty, and it is about time to blow the lid 
on some of the systems we have," he 
said. 

Morse has researched consumer 
understanding of terminology used 
in advertising and savings contracts. 
He drafted the Truth in Savings Act 
introduced in the 92nd, 93rd and 94th 
Congresses, and he also drafted the 
Department of Defense Directive on 
Consumer Credit. 

Two concepts — Annual Percen- 
tage Rate and Periodic Percentage 
Rate — were developed by Morse, 
and he is the author of more than 100 
articles, including "Check Your In- 
terest" and "Cents-ible Interest." 

Morse is a member of the Con- 
sumers Union board and president of 
Consumer Education and Protection 
for Kansas. 

He received his undergraduate 
degree in economics at the Universi- 
ty of Wisconsin, Madison, graduate 
degree in economics at the Universi- 
ty of Chicago, and doctorate at Iowa 
State University in 1942. 



by Doug & Dick 



CLASSIFIED RATES 
One day: 15 words or fewer. $2.25. IS 
cents per word over 15; Two consecu- 
tive days: IS words or lewer, $3.25, 20 
cents per word over 1 5: Three consecu- 
tive days: 15 words or lewer, $4.00, 25 
cents per word over 1 5; Four consecu- 
tive days: 15 words or lewer, $4.50, 30 
cents per word over 1 5; Five consecu- 
tive days: 15 words or lewer, $4.75, 35 
cents per word over 15. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



01 



MARY KAY Cosmetics -Skin care-glamour prod- 
gels Free facial call Fions Taylor, 539-2070 Handi 
capped accessible (76 118) 

ASK ME about Mary Kay' Janet Mltliken. 539-8469 
(69-88) 

Learn to Fly 

Information on ground school 

and flight training. 

Call Hugh Irvin at 

539-3128 or 532-6311. 



SPRING BREAK Huffy' Limited space available at 
these number one collegiate beach and sHi desti- 
nations South Padre Island. Daylona Beach 
Steamboat Springs. Miami BaachiFort Lauder, 
data Mustang IsiandiPort Aransas. Galveston Is. 
land and Fort Wailon Beacn Call Sunchase Tours 
Central Spring Break Toll Free Hot Line loday lor 
information and reservations— 1800321 5911' 
(79981 



ATTENTION 



02 



STUtV. FOB -106 SOcKs THE. FlftST 
MV. *WEN X Mni* i,jt& ft ujjos* 
•TO»T r THIMK. MURlf 5 AS 
CONTRA TRftlMtMu- CAMP. 



T 6FT 60DJ 61FT TO \toC*A 
RM A HiWVTTE A*JD hJOUJ 
•W LAMOIAW HAS T1CP POO« 
iaLWEJTJIDAOoBil 



SDCttWHERE OWTH1S 
CAWUi "THERE MUfT W£ A 
DtctUT HUMAti BEIW(t OF 
GO0t> irtoRAL Sloe) 




so. . . 1 see vou usitM 

-tb ROCV- AMD ft>l_l VOU'U. 



CHOCOLATE VANILLA, strawberry Need 100 over- 
weight people to try new improved herbal weight 
control program with new flavors No drugs no e«- 
ercise. 100% guaranteed Call 778.5114 or 776- 
1465 (78 98) 

Bored with the United States? 
Go International tor Spring Break! 

MAZATLAN, MEXICO 

FOR $199. 

For more info 
call Shawn at 776-9533 



HERBALIFE INDEPENDENT distributor See us (of 
products Call 776 6114 or 776 1*65 1 76 981 

Edelaines Weddings Plus 

Wedding Dresses 
20-50% off 

421 POYNTZ 776-4498 



Bloom Count v 



By Berkc Breathed 



03 



mar's wpp&tiNb 

pom wem, mm r usrr.' 

/ SIM'S 



benoo 



Mm 




mm/ -He's &r 

OPUS Wine NECK / 

i mm mv wm 
sdrtewm.. 





CMWV 

MmirW 
i 



CFCOHUS 
0YNOCNOR 

fw m mr r 

pem/m 
me? 




FOR RENT-MISC 



RENTAL tYPEWRITERS-Correctmg and non 
correcting Typewriter ribbons lor sale, service 
available Hull Business Machines 715 North 
12th Aggieville 5391413 \V\1\ 



Gnrectabtc typewriters for rent nn 

a daily, weekly or monthly basis. 

See us lor all your typing needs 

776-9469 

s i ■ Lcuvenwtirth. ncnwn fawn t**d office 
v.* 

GARAGE. REASON ABLV priced 1122 Vattier 539 
6128 |Bi a:ii 



Garfield 



By Jim Davis 



Edelaine's Weddings Plus 
TUX SPECIAL $39.99 

on tuxes ordered by 2-28-87 

for any occasion -anytime 

421 POYNTZ 776-W98 




J?W Wf b 




FRANKlM/vW PEAR, I PON' 
GIVE A £?ARN 




FOR RENT-APTS 



04 



TWO BEDROOM I unify duplet Fireplace garage 
west ol campus MW Call 539 4294 or 776 2536 
|69t II 



Peanuts 



By Charles Schulz 




ONLY 

Homestead Rental 

HAS ALL 
YOUR RENTAL NEEDS 
♦Wide Selection 
•Low Monthly Rates 
♦Instant Credit 
♦Immediate Delivery 
♦No Deposit 
♦Purchase Options 
♦Month to Month Lease 
♦No Hidden Costs 
♦Home Owned 
♦Friendly Service 
Furniture-TV -Appliances 

Homestead Rental 

537-8774 
2332 Skv-Vue Lane 



SPACIOUS THREE bedroom nicely tarnished, du 
ptex. near campus Heal, water trash paid No 
pets 53*3085 or 5394133 (8011) 

FREE PENT in January Large two bedroom nicely 
decorated dishwasher, disposal No pets 1350 
deposit required 539- H65 (76 SSI 

ONE BEDROOM two bedroom apartments, tor 
rushed or unfurnished. (new turniturel Westloop 
area Cell 776-9124 1 78tf I 

SPACIOUS, TWO bedroom apartment in convenenl 
downtown location Low utilities, air conditioned, 
covered garage Private and roomy Call 537 1072 
<76 83l 

TWO BLOCKS west of campus Quiet, we" main- 
tained one-bedroom apartment tor maiure. non- 
smoking individual 1216 Lease No pets, water 
beds 5.179686 (82 86| 

NEAR CAMPUS at nice, quiet location -two 
bedroom duplet . available February 1 1270 Call 
537-0152 (77B81 

TWO BEDROOM luiury apartment, block from cam- 
pus Also, live bedroom house, block and one half 
from campus 539 4363 (77 86l 

ROOMMATE NEEDED, share two bedroom (fur 
rushed), close to campus. 350 N Will, Rent tea- 
sonalie Call 5394625 alter 6 o m iw. 13 1 

MONT BLUE 
APARTMENTS 

Leasing for June 
•Studio, 1 & 2 Bedroom 
Apartments 
and Townhouses 
•Close to campus 
539-4447 

ONE BEDROOM apartment. 1205(monlh Gas. heat 
and water included Lease and deposit required 
Call 537 7794 evenings or weekends |78-B8l 

TWO BEDROOM lurury duplex 1 1 replace garage 
west of KSU Available now 1425 Call 539-4294 
(7811) 

THREE BEDROOM larqe lumished apartment near 
oly park No pets deposit required 1350 pe' 
month Call 539 7677 alter 3 30 p m (79-83) 

LARGE TWO bedroom partially lumished basement 
apartment close to campus Mil YistaLane Own 
en I ranee no pets parking lor two cars Deposit 
plus rent available now Pay own electricity Phone 
235-3550 Topeka 179 881 

LARGE WARM two bedroom apartmenl five blocks 
trom campus No pets $300 Can 776(3181 l79tH 

TWO BEDROOMS, near cly park New carpet 1240 
bills paid 776 0605 or 539 4226 (79-831 

SLEEPING ROOM one block trom campus Reasona 
bly priced 5390410 or 539 2857 (79-831 

1 Bedroom 

close to campus 

new furniture 

new paint 

$ 270 

call 539-1642 
or 

537-4567 



NICE ONE bedroom apartment Water trash two 
thirds gas paid laundry facility Ntce lor graduate 
student or couple 1260'month 539-2482 alter 4 
O m 1 76 86) 



C rossword 



Eugene Shcffcr 



ACROSS 36 Show ex 
i Teutonic ccsslve 

cry love 

4 De-rind 37 Crooked 
8 Hitch 39 tiuys date 

cock 41 "Welcome" 

movie item 

12 Mineral 42 Nourished 
spring 44 Hospital 

13 Cry of events 
weariness 46 Cheese dish 

14 Actor 50 Scrooge 
cry 

51 "The 
Terrihle" 

52 You can't 

right it 

56 1'urtain 
puller 

57 t-imh's 
alias 

58Waikiki 
wn-uih 

59 She sheep 

Solution time 

sWa 

f All 



Jannings 
15 School 
passages 

17 Video 
tape's 
fore 
runner 

18 Actor 
( haney 

19 Ho III-, a 

tribute 
to 
21 Monkey 

(with) 

24 t 'oNiitii.n 
answer 

25 Actress 
Merkel 

26 Mouse 
spotting 

cry 

28 Rise 

32<>rni 
thology 
concern 

34 "You — 
(surely! 



60 Pictured 

61 Motion 
picture 
studio 

DOWN 

1 Hat wood 

2 Tax time 
asst. 

3 Symbol 
of excel- 
lence 

4 American 
Indian 

5 — carte 
6 ! teams 

7 < > pus of 
"i7 Across 

8 Said 
"No way!' 

9 U-ave off 

10 Heap 

1 1 Shade 

sources 

16 Chop off 
23 mlns. 




Yeaterday'a answer 1 -22 



20 Chair 
feature 

21 Hand 
instru 
ment 

22 Black 
birds 

23 Yank's foe 
27 Heer 

holder 

29 "I li«ive" 
singer 

30 Heehive 
Slate 

31 Pido and 
Tabby 

33 Stands 

up for 
35 Type 

writer 

kev 
38 Arachnid 

altodi' 
40 Khadafy, 

eg 
43 Cuts into 

cubes 

45 (beer 

46 Paddy crop 

47 Swear 

48 Lightly 
rooked 

49 Mahjong 
piece 

53 Draw 

54 Fifth sign 
of the 
/ixliac 

56 Shining 




1 22 

V M W X 

" C Y M c 



CRYPTOQl'IP 



lTPFti ZWPYTFIMR. 

YS.1T CFLSC QMP 



ULFCY QMXWRJ ZLF CLXMGT 
Yesterday's Cryptoqulp: THE AUTOCRAT, DARING 
Tl > SUP PAST ANGRY CROWD. FINALLY FLEW THE 
COUP 

Today's Cryptoquip clue. Q equals W 



NICELY FURNISHED one' HDCUcampu* 1260 

bills paid Fu.n.sned tsW biocxscamous S150 
plus part utilities iminin to month leaseokl T*o 
bedroom furnished t*o blocksxampus. 1250 
Call 539-1349 i8084i 

SPACIOUS LIMESIONE one-two bedrooms 1425 
tree neal F.»lh and Osage 494 2756 evenings nr 
532-6873 Jtm 181 83 1 

TWO BE DBOOM- close lo campus Cenirg.air lire 
place sun porch and garage Can 776 5925 IB' 63* 

ADJACENT TO campus 1224 Berirand Nice t*o 
bedroom with garage washer and dryer We pay 
water trash Asking 1350 Call 537 1 745 or 537 
4422 182 90i 



FOR RENT-HOUSES 



05 



TWO BEDROOM lu«ury ttupie*. lirepiace garage 
west of KSU AvallabU now 1425 Call 5394294 
l78tll 



FOR SALE-AUTO 



06 



07 



WE ARE s ee king a reception! si 'Secretary to perlorm 
general oltice tasks Some typing skill needed 
and must be able to work Monday Wednesday. Fri- 
day mornings Worttstudy is a must Appron 
malely twelve hours per week, at $3 50 to S3 75 per 
hour Contact Or Botlman, Family Center, 532- 
6984 (78-82) 

FASHION COMPANY is coming to Town East Comer 
in Manhattan We are a tasl growing retail chain. 
featuring the newdlt In lunior and misses nime 
brand fashions Full and part time positions with 
flexible hours competitive earnings liberal dis 
counts and career advancement opportunities 
Fashion retail experience or education desirable 
Please send your o,u all lie at ions to Fashion Com- 
pany, PO Bon 4498 Lincoln NE 68504 l?8-H2i 

PARTY ANIMALS to organ ire spring break vacations 
lo Florida and Caribbean Earn free trip and cash 
Call us now al t-800 237 8308 days or <904| 441 
S667 evenings (7S-83I 

THE FONE Crisis Center is now accepting volun- 
teers tor the spring semester For additional infor- 
mation pi eas e c al 1 532 -6565 orslopbydurtablem 
the Union on Friday (81-831 

RENT FREE home lo female lor watching lenyear- 
Old daughter weekday alternoons 7767548 (81- 
83l 

STUDENT RECEPTIONISTrfWord Processor, must be 
available to work especially Monday. Wednesday, 
and Friday mornings. appronWriillly 20 hours per 
week, stanirvg immediately idea job for student 
with strong Interest m computer field Studenls 
with employment potential of two years anrJBkp*- 
rtence with microcomputer application 1 packages 
will Bt given preference Ranking factors »ucn as 
GPApaidworke«perreno*.rtgualntancewmimi. 

crocomputars, and lonnevity potential will be COIV 
sidered Submit applications lb Dehra nyd* In 
Room A21, Anderson Hatt Applications wilt be ac 
cepted until Monday. January 26 5 pm |B2 84I 

PART-TIME TO full time booMreeperraCCOunlanl lor 
complete sel ot records Computer skills hetplul 
Send or deliver resume with references lo LERN. 
1554 Hayes Drive, Manhattan, US 66502 Deadline 
Wednesday January 28 (82-84) 

HORTICULTURE STUDENT needed Part time plant 
clem. 12- 15 hoursrweek Must be available to work 
Mondays am Apply at Safeway Store. Village 
Pia/a 182 84i 



NOVA 1977 lour doors good condition Call 776 
3B06 i78B3i 

1968 BUICK Wildcat Olive while vmyi roof lull 

power Engine needs wor* 913765 3889 or 765 

3678 evenings 173 821 
1980 MUSTANG lour cylinder tuibo lour speed 24 

mpg good condition W.400 Call 637 3697 eve 

nmgs (7983) 
1984 FORD Escort GL Four door automatic power 

steering power brakes front wheel drive air AM- 

FM cruise rear window delrosler ciolh interior 

low miles 5394271 1 79-831 

1980 CHEVY Mon/a power steering power brakes 
air automaiic transmission Low miles good con 
dition Call evenings 532 366' 180-84) 

1971 FORD LTD lour door Owneiieaung town Very 
good condition J350 Of best oiler Call 537 4430 or 
532 5172 IB185I 

1979 VW Rabbit AMiFM cassette rear window de 
foqger good mpQ Runs great Call 537-3881 after 
5 30 pm 181 BJl 

1986 FORD F 150 4 v 4 351 V8 4B supercab Low 

mileage Besl oMer 5397409 iSt-9t| 
1977 GOLD VoMiswagan nan Eiceilent condition 

12 300 2388092 (82 85) 



FOR SALE-MISC 

ELECTRIC ORGAN Kimball Superstar II Three 

years old like new Eiceilent condition 913-765 

2236 (78821 
BOSE BOO speake.s 1600— one pan Atlas speaker 

stands 1150 Sansui receiver 250 wail 1300 Call 

776 7689 (79831 
DINETTE VERY good condition 539-4271 i79-83| 
EX-60 SILVER Reed typewriter Besl Ode. 539 7409 

181-91) 



"Have* House of ".'Music 

DOD Guitar Effects 
30% Off 

327 P oyntz 776-7983 

AKC O0L0EN relnever Male nine weeks all shots, 
wormed Call 5392334 ask lor Shawn (81 83) 

OLD UPRIGHT piano Good condition 1150 or best 
offer Commodore 1541 drive monochrome moni- 
tor, plus eitras 1200 or best offer 258 3564 eve 
ninga (8183) 

FOR SALE 40 gallon tijn aquarium comes fully 
equipped Formote information tall T 78 -7845.(81 
851 



HELP WAHTED 



13 



H 



LOST 



14 



HE LP 1 MY best tnend grew legs and walked away II 
you *e seen an HP41 CV in brawn c ase call Brenda 
at 776 5957— I m losl without him No Questions 
substantial reward I81B2) 



NOTICES 



15 



PREPARE FOR summer employment Enroll in tne 
Community Educaiion Advanced Lilesaving class 
by Monday January 26 and fuitili ihe prerequisite 
tor the Water Safety Instructor course The class 
will meet Mondays and Wednesdays Irom 5 30 
p m - 1 25 p m at the KSU nalatonum until March 
4 Enroll at 316 Umberger or call 532 5566 (82 83) 

NEED MONEY tor college 1 Let us match you with 
scholarship and grant money lor which you can 
quality For more information writs Student Finao 
cial Aid Services 16135 W Chelsea Drive Topeka 
KS 66604 IB29t| 



PERSONAL 



16 



ERNIE — HAPPY 19th Birlhday 1 1 hope your itay is as 
special as you am Love ya— Bert PS TOursf-^, 
natingi <82i 

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY Paul* There once was a boy 
named Paul who one year ago had it an Now he 
only gel s se« >n a pan bul tonight he can prove he s 
3 man We only have one thing lett to say Good 
Luck Paul getung a ibi Aioha 1 |B2| 

THE MEN ot Phi Kappa Theta would like lo bring in 
the New Year with a second Little Sister Rush 
Party this Saturday night (Bit 

IF YOU are a girl who likes to let her han down and 
Party the Men ol Phi Kappa Thela would like lo in. 
vile you to our second Little Sisler Rush Parf y Sal 
urday night |B21 



TfoOMMATE WANTED 



17 

TWO NONSMOKING lemales to share lour 
bedroom two-balh duple* Wai* to campus C*.n 
■ral air conditioning, large yarn 'o* utilities and 
Super 10* renl Call 776 3069«ltm 5 p m i '6 831 

FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted To share nice ufcan. 

furnished apartment Own rooi' i pool 

Cico Parti arts Call 537 7181 |7683> 
MALE ROOMMATE needed- Across tfrtal from 
pus 1135imon|h plus utilities 7769369 (76- 

8Bl 
NON SMOKING inmai" Own rocm-balhroom 

Washer dryer 1135 plus one-third uimt.es 537- 

1700 1 78 831 
ROOMMATE WANTED male ir-male lor two 

Bedroom nouse 521 North 10tn 1170 month all 

bills paid 5377485 i 78-831 

MALE ROOMMATE wanted Tola>e«pens>?s II 
mateiy 1225 per month Call 537 18?! i7882i 

FEMALE ROOMMATE nonsmoking Individual 

room Campus East Can 7760972 lalte. 5 pmi 

179-831 
OWN ROOM atm campus 1125 plus utilities 539 

9343 179-831 
NON SMOKING female roommate to share three 

bedroom house Own room inO plus utilities 

iwjsheridryerl 5377463 179 831 
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to share live-bedroom 

house one-tilth ulHibes 1155 month 7762103 

(80-83) 
SOMEONE TO share two- bed room apart menl close 

tocamposandihe vine HOSmionlh plus utilities 

Call 539-5560 (80-821 
NEED A place lo live'' Female roommate wanted 

Apartment right across from campus 1120;month 

i negotiable) plus one lourtn utilities 539 8151 'B0- 

83) 
HOUSE NEEDS roommate J 135 Share eipenses 

Laundry Call 776-9140 (80-831 
WOULD LIKE to share modern bright spacious 

tniee bedroom apartment near camous with one 

more roommate imale or temalei Renl aboul 1200i 

month Can Theo al 532-8387 or 539 6972 [80 831 
MALE ROOMMATES— across street trom campus 

1615 Anderson Three bedrooms 1105imonth 

one third utilities 776 0827 iSt 85) 
MALE - TO share I wo bedroom apartment with three 

»ihei males I95rmonlh. plus utilities Home— 

539 51 98 work - 776 2340 at ter 4 p m (81 85l 

WANTEO FEMALE roommate One hall block Irom 
campus Own large room lirepiace ItOOamonth 
utilities paid Musi see to appreciate 120E 
Bertrand 778-0306 (81 83l 

SHARE TWO bedroom apartment lumished. laun 
dry facilities two blocks trom campus lt65plus 
electricity January and February rent free Call al 
ter 8pm 776 8707 181 85) 

NON-SMOKER OWN room neit to campus Rent 

negotiable 776 3833 before 1 pm or alter 8 pm 

(81851 
WANTED FEMALE roommate to Share houta Own 

bedroom and balh 1200 per month, includes utm 

ties Phone 776 7541 (82-841 

ROOMMATE WANTED, 1110 and oneMMW ulilHies 
Own washer'dryer Spacious lots 01 siorage 776 
6739 (B2JJ41 

MALE ROOMMATE -twOWdroom lumished. Mc- 
Cain Lane. Fireplace Call 539-1 157. attar 8 p m (82 

set 

MALE ROOMMATE wanted Id share new apartment 
Own room and lt55 par month plus utilities (82 
861 



PROFESSIONAL COUPLE in Kansas City. Missouri 
seeking person to cate tor tSmonth-old Flat laun 
dry and preparation ol evening meal Room, board, 
salary phone. TV Ptaia location Call collect. 816 
926 2020OI816 444 2885 (7685) 

EARN 1480 weekly -160 per hundred envelopes 
stulfed Guaranteed Homeworkeri needed lor 
company protect slutting envelopes and assem 
b ling materials Send stamped, self addressed en 
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AIRLINES. CRUISELINES hiring! Summer Career 1 
Good pay Travel Call tor guide, cassette newsse' 
vice! (916) 9444444 E«l 158 (76 135) 

DENTAL HYGIENIST Wanted must have a gentle 
touch, enjoy the people part ol dental practice and 
be able to worn as a team player in a busy dental 
practice Full or part lime opportunities available 
Send typewritten resume and handwritten letter ol 
introduction to PO Bon 704. Manhattan. Kansas 
66502 178-83) 



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SERVICES 

PREGNANT? BIRTHRIGHT can help Fiea preg 

nancy test Contidantial Call 537 9180 103 S 

Fourth St .Suite 25 (111) 
PROMPT ABORTION and contraceptive sermc#* HI 

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EXPERIENCED TYPIST— It tO/page Disc storage 

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10 



KANSAS »TATE COLLEGIAN, Thursday, January 22, 1887 



Changes 



Continued from Page I 



ly inhumane," Travis said. "It's too 
small, it's not air conditioned and in 
the late summertime during two-a- 
days it is almost unbearable because 
there is... very little air circulation." 

Locker room expansion would in- 
volve knocking a hole in the west 
wall and adding a "Butler-type 
building" for the lockers. 

Weight room expansion is 
necessary, according to Travis 
because all 14 athletic teams use the 
weight facility and it would also 



allow space for the football team to 
meet during halftime, 

"(In the present locker room >, the 
coaches can't even see their squad," 
he said. "They don't even have a 
chance to meet with the team at 
halftime together. It's just not a very 
good situation." 

Travis said no changes have been 
made at the facility since 1968, and 
compared with other Big Eight 
facilities, K-Slate is outdated. 

If natural grass was installed, 
K-State would be the only Big Eight 
Conference school with such a sur- 
face — the last school to convert to 
artificial turf was Missouri. 



Restore 



Continued from Page 1 



"There are at least three areas 
where we can achieve savings and 
protect those people who are most at 
risk," Winter said. "I voted for the 
bill last week to achieve the $60 
million in savings because it's 
something we had to do. Now, I think 
we have to consider restoring these 
funds to protect these people." 

Under Branson's bill, slightly 
more than $2 million would be 
returned to public assistance pro- 
grams, $5.8 million would go back to 



medical assistance programs and 
$245,000 would be restored for foster 
care and day care programs. 

Both bills would restore the $5 per 
month reduction in ADC payments 
adopted last week, along with 
similar reductions in general 
assistance welfare payments. Bran- 
son said her bill is designed to pre- 
vent Kansas from losing $6 million in 
federal funds. 

Last week, the Legislature voted to 
cut $60 million from this year's 
budget in order to prevent a pro- 
jected $13 million deficit on June 30. 
Gov. Mike Hayden ordered the 
money be cut, basically following a 
3.8 percent across-the-board ap- 



proach to the budget reductions. 

However, many lawmakers ex- 
pressed concern about cutting funds 
for dependent children, foster care 
and day care programs and vowed to 
find ways to save money in other 
areas so the welfare funding could be 

restored. 

In a memo to Senate President 
Robert V. Talkington, Winter ex- 
plained his bill and said lawmakers 
could cut by 3.8 percent the salaries 
of all state officials earning more 
than $50,000. 

A major squabble between Hayden 
and the Kansas Supreme Court 
developed over the salary reduction 
and Winter said "pretty significant 



savings" would result from a com- 
prehensive salary reduction. 

Also, Winter said the welfare agen- 
cy could save $800,000 by reducing 
the rate it charges private 
intermediate-care nursing homes. 
He suggested the agency reduce its 
payments to last year's level, or 
from the current $55 per day to 
$45.33, over the remaining five mon- 
ths of the current fiscal year. 

"We should also review other 
possible administrative savings in 
(the Department of Social and 
Rehabilitation Services) including a 
hiring freeze for all but direct care 
staff at the hospitals," Winter's 
memo said. 




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1126 Moro 776-5507 

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with the purchase of any sub 
12th & Moro— Aggieville 

expires 2-28-87 with this coupon only 
void with other offers 



HAIR SHACK 

—Full service for men & women— 

•Shampoo/Haircut/Blowdry 

Z mo 

w/KSU ID 

(Good through Jan. 31st) 

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(between Red Cross & Wendy's) Sat. 10 a.m. -3 p.m. 



$1 DEALS 

WOW BARS 2 for $1 
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BISMARCKS 2 for $1 

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Sun. 12-6 p.m. 



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Manhattan. KS 66502 

539-2519 




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Mori. -Sat 9 am -9 p.m. 

Sun. 12-6 p.m. 



2700 Anderson 

Manhattan, KS 66502 

539-2519 



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BEAUTY SUPPLY 



433 
Town East 
Center, jutl 

East of 

Food 4 Lest 

537 3233 



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Sat 
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Sun 1-5 p m 



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Devoted Exclusively to Selling Professional Beauty Products 
Public Welcome Public Welcome 

Expires 2-28-87 




This coupon entitles the bearer to 
$10 toward the purchase of 
prescription glasses or contact 
lenses— $100 minimum purchase 
required. Purchases must be 
made on or before 2-10-87, 
Coupon must be presented at the 
time of purchase. Not valid with 
any other coupon or discounts, 
including continuing care plan 
discounts. 

Dr. Paul E. Bullock, Optometrist 

404 Humboldt, phone 776-9461 




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12 Sessions 
for $25 

New Beginnings will donate S5 lo the junior 

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prom with each $25 tanning purchase 



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F-Sat 6:30 a.m. -2 a.m. 

Sun. 7:30 a.m. -Midnight 



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Marching 



Placard-carrying pro-life 
demonstrators march 
across campus in opposi- 
tion to abortion. See Page 
5. 



Weather 










1 ^^^ ^ 1 \ 


Partly Cloudy 


Partly cloudy today, 
high in low to 
mid-20s. Wind nor- 
theast 10 to 15 mph. 
Cloudy tonight, low 5 
to 10 above. 



Sports 






5 

3 



', . ■ - 







Super Hype 



After months of prepara- 
tion, the NFL season comes 
down to the championship 
game Sunday in Pasadena, 
Calif. — Super Bowl XXI. 
See Page 7. 



Kansas 
State 

Kansas State University 




o 



flcHOD 



Friday 

January 23. 1987 



Manhattan, Kansas 66506 



Volume 93, Number 83 



Final beam 
'milestone' 
for center 

By The Collegian Staff 

Developers of the Manhattan Town 
Center mall held a "topping off" 
ceremony in the mall's future cour- 
tyard Thursday morning. The 
ceremony celebrated the placement 
of the last steel beam of the skeletal 
framework. 

The topping off ceremony is a 
milestone worthy of celebration, said 
the project developer manager from 
Forest City Development, based in 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

"The first milestone was when the 
ground was broken and the seeds 
were planted," he said. "The planted 
seeds have now matured." 

The topping off ceremony is a 
noteworthy milestone because the 
setting of the final piece of steel com- 
pletes the frame of the "super struc- 
ture," he said. 

The next milestone will be the 
celebration of the grand opening, 
which is scheduled for October. The 
developers plan to open the mall to 
the public in November. 

Following the speech, several men 
involved with the project left the 
bandstand and signed the steel beam 
with chalk. Then the beam wat 
prepared to be lifted to the top of the 
framework. 

The steel beam was lifted into 
place by a crane and eased into its 
permanent position by two construc- 
tion workers. 

A tree and an American flag were 
fastened to the final steel beam. The 
tree is a symbol of good luck to the 
future occupants of the Manhattan 
Town Center. 

Setting the last piece of steel is the 
first and most important step in the 
mall's celebration, said Rick Mann, 
Manhattan mayor. 

Mann invited the public to return 
and continue the celebration in Oc- 
tober during the grand opening. 

Manhattan Town Center will be the 
centerpiece of an extensive 
revitalization plan for Manhattan's 
central business district. 

The mall will be an enclosed, 
single-level structure anchored by 
the area's only Dillard's and J.C. 
Penney Co Inc. department stores, 

A "Picnic Place" food court is 
planned for inside the mall, with one 
main restaurant and several smaller 
eating establishments. 

Easy accessibility to the mall will 
be made available by the new four- 
lane arterial currently in construc- 
tion. 

Manhattan Town Center will 
feature sculpted rosette stonework, 
ornate green painted steel trusses, 
an atrium and skylights. 




No explanation given 
for misappropriations 



By JUDY GOLDBERG 

S taff Writer 

No explanation has been given as 
to why a former Department of 
Forestry employee gambled with, 
and lost, his 17-year position by 
misappropriating less than $10,000 in 
state money for personal profit. 

William J. Moyer, Manhattan, 
secured the funds by illegally selling 
government vehicles and parts, and 
altering official reports during his 
last year at K-State. 

Moyer was found guilty of six 
courts of making false writings and 
five counts of felony theft. He began 
a 30-day jail term in the Riley County 
Jail Wednesday night and will per- 
form 100 hours of community ser- 
vice, said presiding Riley County 
District Judge Jerry Mershon 

Moyer resigned in June 1986 after 
investigation of his misdoings began, 
said Jay Schultz, head of the forestry 
department. 

Schultz said Moyer's job entailed 
purchasing excess equipment from 
military installations for use at area 
rural fire departments. 

Moyer prepared paperwork for 
shipment of equipment to the 



forestry department and eventual 
assignment to fire stations. The 
General Services Administration 
was the legal title holder throughout 
all transactions. 

By altering documents, Moyer 
transferred vehicle ownership to 
himself and falsely recorded that at 
least one truck was not received and 
another was "for salvage only," 
court records showed. He then sold 
the trucks for personal profit. 

Five trucks and one aerial lift were 
listed as items illegally obtained by 
Moyer. 

The investigation began after 
Moyer could not account for a vehi- 
cle during a project review, Schultz 
said. 

Reviews occur sporadically, but 
this study was initiated as a result of 
Schultz' s suspicion. 

"I had had some concern that 
maybe some of the vehicles were be- 
ing improperly disposed of," Schultz 
said. 

Schultz said Moyer's work had 
been audited before, and he did not 
know why Moyer began stealing 
money. 

Mershon said he was also unaware 
of Moyer's intentions. 



"He just made some mistakes." 
Mershon said. "I think he's truly 
remorseful." 

Moyer said he did not wish to ex- 
plain his actions. He said all the in- 
formation about the case is in the 
newspaper "and that's where it 
should die." 

After he serves his community ser- 
vice hours, Moyer said he will look 
for a job in "whatever I can find," 
When asked if he would apply for 
another position at K-State he said, 
"Don't kid yourself." 

Moyer deceived more than 
forestry department officials. 

Lon Wilson, Weir, was cited in 
court records as buying a truck from 
Moyer, Wilson said he was told the 
money was going to the forestry 
department. 

Wilson, a "junk dealer," said he 
purchased many trucks from Moyer 
and sold them to customers. He said 
he also paid for items he never 
received, 

"l paid for a lot of stuff that 1 didn't 
get," he said. 

Moyer's former position is current- 
ly vacant When filled, it will be 
restructured to prevent a similar oc- 
currence, Schultz said. 



Senators entertain resolution 
on agency service charge fee 



Starr/Gary Lytle 

Stcelworkers fasten Hie final piece of steel to the «uler structure of the 
Manhattan Town Center during topplng-off ceremonies Thursday at the con- 
struction site. 



By MICHAEL MORRIS 
Collegian Reporter 

Student Senate convened for the 
first time this semester Thursday 
night and discussed a resolution ob- 
jecting to service charges being 
enacted by the University on gross 
receipts of three student-funded 
agencies: the Union, Lafene Student 
Health Center and Student Publica- 
tions Inc. 

One of the concerns in the resolu- 
tion is that the timing of the service 
charge did not allow for interaction 
between the University administra- 
tion, the Student Governing Associa- 
tion and the three student-funded 
agencies to study the impact of the 
service charge, review the relation- 
ship between the University and the 
agencies and allow the agencies to 
make appropriate budgetary plans. 

Sally Traeger, senior in marketing 
and student senate chairwoman, said 
George Miller, vice president of ad- 
ministration and finance, notified 
her at the end of last semester that a 
service charge was being proposed 
by the administration. 



Miller said the service charge was 
enacted so quickly because of the 3,8 
percent cuts mandated by Gov. 
Hayden Otherwise, it would have 
not been enacted until the next fiscal 
year, he said. 

Miller also said President Wefald 
declared the service charge a per- 
manent measure due to the Universi- 
ty's lack of funds. 

Debate will begin on the resolution 
next Thursday after its second 
reading. 

In other action. Student Senate re- 
jected a proposal that would have 
established an ad hoc committee to 
study senate representation by a 
25-15 vote. 

The committee's mandate would 
have included examination of the 
current representation system while 
analyzing any alternative proposals 

"I just feel that the residence hall 
and off-campus students are more 
aware of the issue, and I hope it 
(awareness in student representa- 
tion) stimulates their interests," 
said Mike Kadel, senior in bakery 
science and one of four sponsors of 
the proposed bill. 



•*I feel that it has been a long, 
grown -out process, and I'm glad it's 
over," he said. 

Kadel said although the current 
senate will no longer consider the 
measure, there is a possibility a 
future senate might. 

Senate also discussed a bill that 
would allow a student body president 
to be eligible for re-election. 

The bill will go through its second 
reading and debate next Thursday. 

Although Student Body President 
Steven Johnson, junior in agriculture 
economics, is a sponsor of the pro- 
posal, he said he has no plans to run 
for re-election. 

Senate elected Kirk Caraway, 
senior in political science, as the new 
faculty-senate representative, 
replacing Susan Baird, senior in 
journalism and mass communica- 
tions. Doug Leming, junior in 
business administration, was ap- 
pointed as the 1987-88 coordinator of 
finances for student senate 

Student Senate meets each Thurs- 
day evening at 7 in the Union Big 
Eight Room. The meetings are open 
to the public. 



Philippino marines open fire on crowd 



By The Associ ated Press 

"MANILA, Philippines — 
Thousands of chanting peasants 
demanding free land surged into a 
police line Thursday and marines 
opened fire, killing 12 people and 
wounding 94. It was the bloodiest 
street battle of Corazon Aquino's 
young presidency 

Aquino, who has been in office 11 
months, said in a nationwide broad- 
cast address afterward: "There will 
be those who seek to exploit this 
tragic incident to derail our efforts to 
bring democracy ." 

Also on Thursday, her attempt to 
make peace with Communist rebels 
all but collapsed as negotiators 
suspended talks indefinitely because 
of death threats. 

An estimated 10,000 people 
organized by the leftist Movement of 
Philippine Farmers marched from 
the downtown Post Office toward the 
presidential palace to demand that 
farm plots be given to the landless. 

Presidential spokesman Teodoro 
Benigno said Aquino was at the Pink 
Sisters Convent in suburban 
Marikina, about nine miles from the 
palace, at the time of confrontation. 

Benigno said the president visits 
the convent occasionally to pray. 
When she heard about the shooting 



Government officials suspend talks 



she rushed back to the palace. 

About 500 national police and 
marines lined up eight deep waiting 
for them at the Mendiola Bridge 300 
yards from Malacanang Palace's 
main gate The bridge was the site of 
several bloody civilian-military con- 
frontations during the 20-year rule of 
ex-President Ferdinand E. Marcos 

As the front ranks of marchers ap- 
proached police lines, they began 
chanting "Come and join! Don't be 
afraid!" Marchers linked arms 
across Recto Street and began 
pushing against the front line of 
brown-uniformed troops of the In 
tegrated National Police deployed in 
front of the bridge. 

The police, behind long plastic 
shields, shoved the marchers back a 
few steps. But the protesters then 
surged forward. The police fell back 
about 10 yards. Stones flew from 
among the marchers. 

Suddenly, marines in full battle 
dress deployed behind the police 
opened fire with M 16s, first into the 
air for about two minutes, then into 
the panicked crowd for three more 
minutes The firing continued while 



people ran into the street to drag the 
dead and wounded out of the firing 
line. 

When the firing ceased, four 
jeeploads of police raced forward, 
scattering the remaining 
demonstrators with volleys of tear 
gas. 

Before the clash, Jaime Tedeo, the 
leader of the Movement of Philippine 
Farmers, exhorted the marchers to 
challenge the forces guarding the 
palace. 

Denouncing what he and other lef- 
tist and peasant leaders have called 
slow and inefficient implementation 
of land reform, he told a rally before 
the march: "Charge to Malacanang ! 
Let's break down the barricades!" 

Several young men among the 
marchers tore iron bars from a gate, 
and others carried wooden clubs with 
protruding nails 

Aquino recently granted land titles 
to nearly 6.000 tenant farmers in nor- 
thern Luzon. Heherson Alvarez, the 
agrarian reform minister, says his 
ministry is preparing to distribute 
about 18,000 titles and more will 
come later 



Aquino has said the program 
should eventually provide up to 4 
million landless peasants with their 
own tracts. 

Aquino, who came to power 11 
months ago after a civilian-military 
uprising forced Marcos to flee to 
Hawaii, expressed shock over the 
killings. She announced creation of a 
special commission under retired 
Supreme Court Justice Jose Feria to 
investigate the clash and promised to 
punish those responsible 

She said the military commander 
of the capital region, Maj. Gen. 
Ramon Montano, would be placed on 
leave during the investigation 

She referred to a Feb 2 plebiscite 
on a new national Constitution seen 
as a "vote of confidence" in her ad- 
ministration. 

"In the period before the 
plebiscite, attempts to destabilize 
the government and defeat our 
democratic aim will intensify," she 
said "We are prepared for this con- 
tingency We shall have law and 
order throughout our land, even as 
we pursue justice in this case." 

Military sources said troops re- 
main on alert in the Manila area 
because of fears Marcos loyalists 
and dissident officers might attempt 
a coup to block the ratification vote. 



Students reap benefit 
of airline's price war 



By JUDD AN MS 
Collegian Reporter 



K-State students are reaping 
the benefits of an airfare price 
war between Eastern Airlines and 
other air carriers operating out of 
Kansas City International Air- 
port. 

"This new Eastern 149 promo- 
tion, from Kansas City to 25 major 
non-stop markets, is aimed at 
Braniff," said Nancy Howse, of- 
fice manager of International 
Tours of Manhattan. 

Eastern's promotion is $49 each 
way in coach on a round-trip pur- 
chase. Tickets must be purchased 
by Saturday, and all traveling 
must be done between Feb 1 and 
March 31, 1967. 

"Now that Eastern is part of the 
Texas Air conglomerate, the 
capital is available to put Braniff 
out of business," she said, 

Eric Matson, senior in com- 
puter science, is one student who 
recently took advantage of the 
lower rates and went to Chicago 
for New Year's. Matson, who paid 



only $38 for his round-trip ticket, 
recommends such deals to other 
students who may not have 
previously considered air travel, 

"I liked it because 1 was up and 
down and into Chicago in 50 
minutes, while also saving 
money," Matson said 

Hildy Hurren, travel agent for 
Kansas State Travel, agrees that 
the Eastern deal is by far the best 
at this point and has already been 
extremely popular. 

"Eastern announced these 
rates Monday morning." Hurren 
said. "We were a zoo the rest of 
the day, 

"As it stands now, we have very 
few openings left because of the 
fixed volume of seats we are 
given and due to the fact that peo- 
ple have jumped at the chance to 
travel cheaply." she said 

Howse said that the Eastern 
Airline promotion is being adver- 
tised only on Kansas City radio 
stations and in Kansas City 
newspapers, so most K-State 

See AIRFARES. Page 9 



MMMMM* 



^^^mmmmmmmm 






KAHtA» tTATt COLLEGIAN, Friday, January 23, 1987 



V 



Briefl y 



By The Associated Press 



NA TIONAL 

Student pedals airplane to record 

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE. Calif. - A medical student pedal- 
ed the experimental airplane Eagle 37.2 miles Thursday, unofficially 
breaking the world record for human-powered flight. 

"I fee) great," pilot Glenn Tremml shouted to reporters after the 
92-pound Eagle skidded to a 10:38 a.m. landing on a desert lakebed 
after a two-hour, 13-minute flight. 

Tremml said he would have flown farther except one of his feet 
slipped off a pedal and he couldn't reinsert it before the craft touched 
down. 

"As soon as I touched down I knew the race was over," he said. 

Tremml, who had powered the 11 -foot propeller with pedals, climb- 
ed out of the plane and was greeted with a hug and a handshake from 
his ground crew 

The effort was about the same as triathlon competition, said 
Tremml, a 26-year-old veteran amateur triathlete. However, he said 
that without any competition he had to motivate himself throughout 
the flight, during which he lost three pounds. 

"What I would do in my mind is set a goal for the next turn, the 
next lap," he said. "The difficulty of this flight is that there's no 
finish line 



Reagan speaks to anti-abortioners 

WASHINGTON — Encouraged by President Reagan and undeter- 
red by heavy snow, abortion foes gathered today to protest the 14th 
anniversary of the Supreme Court's landmark decision legalizing 
abortion 

Keagan told an estimated 2,000 demonstrators, gathered in a park 
near the White House, "Abortion is not a harmless medical pro- 
cedure but the taking of the life of a living human being. This tragic 
and terrible toll continues at a rate of more than 4,000 young lives 
lost each day. 

"Our national commitment to the dignity of all human life must 
begin with respect for the most basic civil right, the right to life," the 
president said via telephone hookup. 

Reagan was challenged by the anti •abortion leaders to veto legisla- 
tion that purportedly provides federal funds for upwards of 10,000 
abortions annually in the District of Columbia. 

"I'll get right on that right away to see what can be done," Reagan 
said. 

Super Bowl could increase violence 

NEW YORK — The Super Bowl could bring out the worst in a mar- 
riage, some experts in family violence believe. 

Rana Lee, community education assistant at Marin Abused 
Women's Services in the San Francisco Bay area, says her informal 
research shows a marked increase in calls to women's crisis centers 
and hotlines from battered women on Super Bowl night. 

Lee says there are more calls than usual during the football season 
on Sunday and Monday nights after games. 

"But Super Bowl is by far the worst. I'm expecting it to be a 
nightmare," she said. 

While the game may not cause violence directly, those who 
specialize in such problems say a combination of the aggressive 
sport, drinking, depressing winter weather and possible disappoint- 
ment over a losing team can exacerbate an already abusive relation- 
ship. 

"If you watch something violent and you don't work it off, you 
work it up," says Murray Straus, a sociologist who specializes in 
family violence at the University of New Hampshire at Durham. 
' Studies have proved that the more people watch violence, the more 
they themselves will be violent." 




REGIONAL 

EPA proposes waste site cleanup 

WASHINGTON — A hazardous waste site at Hutchinson was pro- 
posed Thursday by the Environmental Protection Agency for possible 
cleanup under the federal Superfund program. 

Known as the Obee Road site, the problem area in eastern Hutchin- 
son is made up of contaminated ground water. 

The action by the federal agency brought to two the number of 
sites in Kansas under consideration by the government as Superfund 
candidates. The other proposed site, the Furley waste dump near 
Wichita, was made a candidate in October 1984. Final decisions will 
be made later on whether they will be included on the list of 703 sites 
nationwide now qualifying for federal cleanup monies. 

There are six sites in Kansas currently covered by the Superfund 
program, which was established in 1980 to clean up the nation's most 
serious toxic waste dumps. 

The EPA said an estimated 1,900 people in suburban Obee. an unin- 
corporated community just east of Hutchinson, had private wells that 
tap into the shallow aquifer as a source of drinking water. The well 
users have been connected to a municipal water supply system. 

The agency said the state has tentatively identified a former city 
landfill as the source of the contamination, which includes organic 
chemicals such as benzene, ethylene and toulene. Local industries 
dumped sludges and wastes into the landfill before it closed in 1973, 
and the EPA said the Defense Department may have disposed of 
solvents at the landfill. The airport was owned by DOD until the ear- 
ly 1960s. 

Committee endorses death penalty 

TOPEKA — After only 11 minutes of discussion, the House Federal 
and State Affairs Committee endorsed a measure Thursday that 
would make death by lethal injection a possible sentence for anyone 
convicted of first-degree murder or felony murder in Kansas 

The committee made only one minor change in the bill before it 
was approved on an unrecorded voice vote and sent to the House 
floor Speaker Jim Braden said he has scheduled floor debate on the 
proposal for Wednesday with a final vote coming the next day. 

After the committee meeting, Gov. Mike Hayden praised the 
panel's quick action on the bill and said his long-standing support for 
the death penalty would not be shaken regardless of its cost. 

A University of Kansas law professor told the committee Wednes- 
day his studies show the state might have to spend more than $50 
million during the next five to 10 years to finance the extra cost of 
capital murder litigation before even one execution is carried out. 

INTERNA TIONAL 

Chinese government fires officials 

PEKING - The two top officials of the Academy of Sciences were 
fired Thursday, apparently becoming the latest victims of a cam- 
paign against liberal Western ideas that began after student protests 
last month. 

Another government announcement said a new office had been 
created to control the news media and publishing. 

A brief dispatch by the official news agency Xinhua did not say 
why President Lu Jiaxi of the academy, who is in his mid-60s, and 
Vice President Yan Dongsheng, 68, had been relieved of their posts. 
It said they "were removed" by decision of the National People's 
Congress Standing Committee. 

Lu, a chemist of world stature trained in Britain, had been presi- 
dent of the academy since August 1982. He was replaced by Zhou 
Guangzhao, 57, a theoretical physicist and one of the academy's 
three vice presidents 



fi t S T AU R AN T 



AGGIEVILLE 
FRIDAY 

VODKA 
DRINKS 

$1.50 

DRAWS 

75C 

Free 
Hors D'oeuvres 

616 N. 12th 
539-9967 



nMtSuu 

AGGIEVILLE 
SATURDAY 

TONIC 
DRINKS 

$1.50 

SCHNAPPS 

$1.00 

616 N.I 2th 
539-9967 



Closed Classes — Spring 1987 



oo j in 


03500 


05620 


or no 


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35210 





Campus Bulletin 



ANNUL NIKMENTS 

U-I.EAKN is looking {or a few good volunteers 
for Ihii spring. Don't waste away the spring hours 
- be a U-LearN volunteer Call 532-64*2 or stop 
by Holton Hall 02 

ENGLISH CONVERSATIONAL IT TO HIM. 
PROGRAM, ottered by 1 hi- international Student 
Center, needs volunteer tutors. For more infor- 
mation, call Karen at S32-fcH8 

STUDENT ELECTIONS t OMMITTKE; Filing 
deadline lor SGA elections is Tuesday Applies 
lions are available in the SGS oil ice for student 
body president, student senators and Board of 
Student Publications 

ALPHA ML' ALPHA: All resume* are due Jan 
30, and members should contact Teres* Leighty 
Also, there will be a field trip Jan 30 to Hallmark 
Members should contact Angle Rowland if in- 
terested 

AC, STUDENT COUNCIL ELECTION AP- 
PLICATIONS are available in Waters 120 and are 
due Monday. 

BLUE KEY SENIOR HONORARY member- 
ship applications are available in Anderson 122 
and are due by 1 p.m. Feb, 8 

OPEN HOUSE SPECIAL EVENTS COMMIT- 
TEE; Any student or orgnnn.ii ion interested in 
performing ass special eve»t for Open House '87 
can contact Kathy Peirce at 5394651 or the 
Department of Arts and Sciences at 532-6300 



CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT 
CENTER wilt be showing videotapes prepared by 
the College Placement Council in Holtz 10TR "In- 
terview Preparation" and "The Interview" will 
be shown at 3:30 p. m Monday, and "The Inter 
view" and "Interview Follow Up" will be shown 
at 3:36 p m Tuesday 

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT is 

now posting sign-up schedules lor on-campus 
employment interviews by Kansas, regional and 
national employers All eligible candidates are 
urged to register and apply 



TODAY 

INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
meets at 7 p.m. In Union 213 

SATURDAY 

All STUDENT COL NCI L will have an Ag 
Leadership Conference at 9 a . m to noon in Union 
Big Eight room 

SUNDAY 

ALPHA TAL UMEAGA LITTLE SISTERS 

meet at i p m at the house 

PHI KAPPA TAU LITTLE SISTERS meet al 
p.m. at the house. 

SHE Dl"S meet at 2 p m at the Delta I'psilon 
house 



Reagan proposes cuts 
for Customs personnel 



By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - The Reagan ad- 
ministratinn wants to cut in half 
funds for airborne drug-interdiction 
operations of the Customs Service 
and eliminate 2,000 Customs jobs at 
the same time officials are calling 
for a stepped- up war on drugs, a 
Senate Finance Committee source 
said Thursday. 

The cuts were contained in the 
Reagan administration's budget pro- 
posal submitted to Congress earlier 
this month but not detailed at that 
time, said the source, who spoke on 



condition he not be named. 

The Reagan proposal calls for 
reducing the fiscal 1987 Customs per- 
sonnel budget from $830.1 million to 
(803 million, said the Finance Com- 
mittee source. 

The proposal would reduce 
Customs' personnel limit from 15,000 
to to 13,000 by 1988, with 1,500 jobs cut 
in 1987 and 500 lost in 1988, the source 
said. 

In addition to those cuts, the 
Reagan proposal calls for a drastic 
reduction in air support for drug in- 
terdiction, from $179.9 million to 
$86.2 million, the source said. 




SUPER SUNDAY! 

WATCH THE GIANTS vs. BRONCOS ON OUR 
7 FT. TV! 



« 




• SUPER BUFFET 

30 lbs. Crab Legs 

28 lbs. BBQ Ribs 

And More For $1 Plate 

(white it lasts) 

• 80C DRAWS 

• FREE POPCORN 



1113 Mom 



7760030 




c 



KMAN 1050 



» 



RADIO AUCTION 



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AUCTION OAK SMUBMV. JANuAS* » 



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2- VCR & Video Cassette Rental pkg HOME CINEMA 

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Soft & Chain Cutters WATERS TRUE VALUE HARDWARE 

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Sewing machine tune-up WEISNER'S SEW UNIQUE 

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1 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, FrMay, January 23, 198? 



Director of Printing Service 
to stress production quality 



By The Collegian Staff 

The new director of K-State Prin- 
ting Service said he believes his job 
will be an opportunity to concentrate 
on producing quality work. 

Harv Dahl, who assumed his posi- 
tion Monday, said he has already 
noticed differences between 
K-State's services and those at the 
University of Wisconsin in Madison 
where he was previously employed 

In Wisconsin. Dahl coordinated a 
printing system that included 27 dif- 
ferent campuses across the state. 
The size of the systems is the major 
difference between the two schools. 

The printing services operate on 
about the same budget. However, 
because the Wisconsin printing ser- 
vice had a large area to cover and 
the equipment was smaller, Dahl 
said he didn't have the time and 
equipment to produce high-quality 
products. 

Since K-State's service prints 
material for only one campus and the 
equipment is more modem, he said 
he'll have more time to spend on 
printing and will be able to use more 
of a variety of colors. 

Dahl was looking for a new 
challenge when he changed jobs. 

"After 16 years at Wisconsin, I was 
able to achieve my goals," he said. 
"Things started to repeat 
themselves, and I knew it was time 
for a change." 

Dahl and his wife, Pat, grew up in 
the Midwest and wanted to return to 
the Great Plains. K-State's location 
and the opportunities the University 
offered brought him and his family to 
Manhattan. 

Service is a No. 1 priority, Dahl 
said, and his main goal is to make 
sure the Printing Service is in a posi- 
tion to meet the needs of the Univer- 
sity. 

After attending the North Dakota 
State School of Science in Wahpeton 
for two years. Dahl received a jour- 
nalism degree from the University of 
North Dakota in Grand Forks. He 
has two daughters, Ginny, IS, and 
Ellen, 12. 



Get Personal 

With a Collegian 
Classified! 




Ag proposal unfair, expert says 



Staff/ Br«t Hacker 
Improving service is Harv l»ahl*s No. I priority as the new director iif K-State 
Printing Service. 



WINTER CLEARANCE 



THE ICE CREAM 
:" SOCIAL 

i f WE'VE 
I MOVED 

to 

1439 Anderson 

Student Services Center 



By DERON JOHNSON 
Collegian Reporter 



President Reagan's proposal to 
reduce farm subsidies over the 
next several years is akin to 
"changing the rules in the middle 
of the game," said a local 
agriculture observer. 

Gordon Hibbard, director of 
communications for Kansas Farm 
Bureau, said Reagan's proposed 10 
percent reduction in target prices 
each year for three years beginn- 
ing in 1988 would jeopardize 
farmers' gross income and the 
strides made by the United States 
in recent years to become more 
competitive in the world market. 

A target price is a bookkeeping 
figure used to compute deficiency 
payments farmers receive when 
market prices are low. 

"The target price... was set by 
Congress in the 1985 farm bill," 
Hibbard said. "It's a key ingre- 
dient in any farm program." 

Currently, the wheat target price 
is $4.38 per bushel, frozen at that 
price since 1984 despite annual in- 
creases in inflation. If Congress 
approves Reagan's cut. the target 
price would be cut 44 cents per 
bushel in 1988 and by (1.19 during 
the next three years. 

Hibbard said Reagan's proposal 
undermines the current 
government-industry agreement 
stated in the farm bill. 

"I think one thing we've been 



concerned about is we're changing 
the rules in the middle of the 
game," he said. 

The current farm bill, which will 
be replaced with a new one in 1990, 
is not the first to contain a target 
price clause. 

"Target prices go clear back to 
1976 to '77," Hibbard said. 
"They've been around for a 
number of years." 

Reagan's proposal comes on top 
of target price reductions already 
stipulated by the current bill, he 
said. 

The deficiency payments — and 
thus the proposed reductions — af- 
fect nearly 80 percent of Kansas 
farmers, said Darrell Holaday. 
marketing director for Kansas 
Farm Bureau. 

"The most recent statistics in 
Kansas are 79 percent (of the 
farmers) were in compliance last 
year (with the farm bill>," Hola- 
day said. "I look for us to be over 
80 percent this year." 

Current deficiency payments to 
farmers in the nation total nearly 
$11 billion, Holaday said. This in- 
cludes subsidies of $700 million to 
$800 million for milo producers, 
$3.5 billion for wheat producers 
and $6.5 billion to $7 billion for corn 
producers. 

The Reagan administration 
claims the target price cuts would 
reduce the budget by an estimated 
$13 billion, although Holaday said 
he wasn't sure if that figure is cor- 



rect. 

"There's some question whether 
it will save that much or not," he 
said. "They're looking at probably 
saving $4 billion in deficiency 
payments." 

The balance of the $13 billion 
could possibly be made up by ad- 
ministrative costs and money sav- 
ed from the Soil Conservation Ser- 
vice and Farmers Home Ad- 
ministration budgets, he said. 

Holaday said a 10 percent reduc- 
tion in the target price would result 
in a 10 percent reduction in 
farmers' earnings 

"It's going to affect gross in- 
come," he said. 

Holaday, however, doesn't con- 
tend that farm spending should not 
be cut Target price reductions just 
aren't the way to accomplish it, he 
said. 

"Somewhere a cutback's going 
to occur." he said "The fact that 
we need to cut farm spending - 
everybody agrees that needs to oc- 
cur." 

Target prices essentially nerve 
two purposes: to protect the 
farmer in times of lagging market 
prices and to increase U.S. com- 
petitiveness by controlling produc- 
tion. 

"The target prices are in place to 
provide an incentive to decrease 
production," Hibbard said. "These 
farm programs are inclined to 

See SUBSIDY, Page 1» 




LIFT OFF '87 

A Leadership Conference 
for Renewing Motivation in Student Groups 

Speakers: Dr. Walter Woods 
Mr. Steve Miller 
Dr. Pat Bosco 
Dr. David Mugler 

January 24, 1987 

9 a.m. -Noon 

Big 8 Room 

K-State Union 

Presented by: 

Ag Student Council 





Enjoy the Super Bowl 

with Pan Pizza to go. 

Come in and pick it up 

or have it delivered. 

For a party of two or twenty, there is nothing better for the Super 
Bowl than Pizza Hut® Pan Pizza. 

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when you call ahead. 

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Pizza Huts of Manhattan 1987 



Editorial 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Friday, January 23, 1987 - 4 



Uncle's prejudice is blind, not his love 



The holiday season is very important to my 
family. Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas — 
all the holidays are special. Birthdays are 
pretty important, too. They sometimes will 
last several days depending on schedules. 
My mother even sends cards and sometimes 
small gifts to her four daughters on Hallo- 
ween and Valentine's Day and whatever 
other holiday she can think of. 

It's really neat the way my family pulls 
together at the holidays. If we can't all be in 
the same place on the exact holiday, we try 
to make plans to be together a couple of days 
later. This Christmas, three of the four 
daughters were home on Christmas, with the 
fourth arriving the day after. And this year, 
both of my grandmothers were there. 

On Christmas Eve, we all go to church, 
then back home to visit, eat, etc. When we 
were younger, we would spend time organiz- 
ing all the gifts under the tree. Each one 
would pick a spot around the tree and stack 
the gifts intended for us in neat piles, one for 
each of us and one for Mom and Dad. And to 
mark the spot, we would hang our stockings 
on the tree with a clothespin so Santa would 
leave all the neat little treats in the right spot 
for us. 

This year we came home and watched a 
movie. "White Christmas," on the 
videocassette recorder Rather apropos* 
don't you think? 1 loved it. 

You would think that after a while the 



holidays might become staid and boring. But 
I love Christmas. The holiday season has to 
be one of the most special times for me. 1 
may not always get into the spirit of things as 
soon as I should, but eventually I get there. 

On Christmas morning, we all open our 
gifts. We no longer get up at the crack of 
dawn — we're much more sensible than that. 
Then we have a big family dinner, usually 
turkey with all the trimmings. 

My mother has lived in our hometown all 
her life. Her mother still lives there so all of 
my mom's family eventually visit. In fact, an 
aunt and uncle live 15 miles away, and 
another set of relatives livedo miles away 
So Christmas dinner is usually a fairly big 
deal. 

Two of my sisters are married. Of course, 
my two brothers-in-law are now included in 
all the family gatherings, as is my almost-3- 
year-old nephew, My mom wouldn't have it 
any other way. She's very big on family and 
keeping it together. I agree with her 

I'm very proud of my parents and sisters. 
The two who are married made fairly good 
choices in spouses, and all three have made 
good choices in careers. All are happy and 
content and seem to be doing well. 

So what does all of this have to do with 
anything? 

One of my sisters has an interracial mar- 
riage, which really is not the problem. The 
problem, and the reason for all the talk about 



KU's label as flagship 
could damage K-State 



The verdict is in. 

Upon reviewing the version of 
K-State's mission statement 
adopted by the Board of Regents, 
University officials believe it's an 
adequate representation of 
K-State. 

Since the major thrust of the in- 
stitution is guided by its land- 
grant tradition, K-State's 
agricultural research programs 
and extension services receive 
the main emphasis in the state- 
ment. Moreover, the notice 
recognizes the importance of the 
College of Education. 

But is K-State a comprehensive 
university? Yes, but apparently 
not comprehensive enough. 

Stanley Koplik, executive 
director of the Regents, said the 
University of Kansas most "fits 
the label of a comprehensive 
university (in the state)." With 
that designation, K-State has of- 



ficially taken a back seat to KU. 
Diehard Wildcats may scoff at 
the crowning of the Jayhawks, 
but maldng KU the "flagship" 
school of Kansas has important 
long-term implications for this 
University. If the Regents must 
choose between KU and K-State 
for a new program, will they pick 
the No. 1 campus or the second - 
place university? 

The answer is clear. When a 
choice must be made, K-State 
will almost certainly lose every 
time. This is not sour grapes. 
This is reality, and the ad- 
ministration should be prepared 
for reality's future consequences, 

"The mission statement is in- 
dicative of some of the strengths 
of Kansas State University, and I 
hope it will allow the University 
to get stronger," Koplik said. 

We hope so, too, Stan. 



Country loses benefits 
if leaders slash funds 



Education Secretary William 
Bennett is having a nasty time of 
it lately. He has been cast by 
senators as being the fox in the 
henhouse of education. 

Instead of defending federal 
education spending, Bennett is 
leading the retreat — allowing 
President Reagan to slash 
federal assistance to low-income 
students by approximately 50 
percent. 

Experts predict one in every 
six students currently receiving 
federal aid would no longer be 
eligible and this. White House of- 
ficials estimate, would "save" 
the nation quite a bit of money. 

What is the old saying? Educa- 
tion is an investment? That is 
what parents, teachers, college 
peers and yes. ..the loan 
officers, sold us on. We were led 
to believe too, that it was not just 
a personal investment. An 
educated public was an invest- 
ment for the nation. 



Historically, federal ad- 
ministrators have supported 
assistance spending because they 
used to believe that education 
was an investment. NDSL, when 
it was first conceived, stood for 
National Defense Student Loan. 
Leaders at that time believed an 
educated citizenry was the key to 
a secure nation. 

The ironic twist in the plot is 
that Bennett's support of 
Reagan's proposed cuts in educa- 
tion appears with a widely 
published report of how 
American students compare with 
students worldwide. It wasn't 
pretty. 

It seems obvious if our national 
security is dependent on well 
educated individuals both will 
suffer by cuts in education. 

If our nation's leaders can no 
longer be trusted to act in the in- 
terests of the public, students and 
educators will soon have to ac- 
tively battle for funding. 



Kansas 
State 



€®flB 



KIHTOH 

Jonie Trued 
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Erin Eicher 



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JEAN 
TELLER 

Collegian 
Columnist 


w 


|P^^" ■^■s^ 



Christmas dinner and family, is that the 
marriage is a source of irritation or anger on 
the part of some of my family. The im- 
mediate family has come to grips with it, and 
we accept Katherine's husband, Richard, as 
part of the family, just as we do my nephew. 
Rick. 

It perhaps is not the match I would have 
liked to see my sister make. I feel like my 
sisters can do much better in everything — 
I'm very protective of them. NO one is good 
enough for MY sisters. But Katherine is hap- 
py. And that is the key phrase. 

One set of relatives do not and will not ac- 
cept the marriage. It happens to be my 
mother's only brother and his wife who con- 
demn my sister for her choice of spouse. And 
it hurts my mother to the quick. 

It all came to a point this Christmas. My 
aunt and uncle refused to come to Christmas 
dinner because my sister and brother-in-law 
would be there. 



It didn't matter that the rest of the family 
was going to be there, including my maternal 
grandmother. It didn't matter that it was 
Katherine's choice and her happiness at 
stake. It didn't matter that the attitude con- 
tinues to tear my mother apart. She hates to 
see the family split. But my uncle will not ac- 
cept an interracial marriage — he doesn't 
believe blacks and whites should mix. 

1 have no idea what happened in the past to 
cause a member of my family to be so pre- 
judiced. I know it bothers a lot of people, and 
I won't say that the idea didn't cause me 
some initial trepidation. But I have since 
come to terms with my own reaction. 

I know Katherine and Richard and their 
children will meet with resistance and dif- 
ferent forms of prejudice in the years to 
come. But from their own family? 

And the way my aunt and uncle treat my 
nephew is chilling. What child knows what 
prejudice is? No child should know the mean- 
ing of that term. And no child should be 
blamed for an alleged fault of his parents. 
He's only 3, for heaven's sake. 

To me, a family is a support group. Even if 
all the members don't agree or condone 
another's actions, they should at least sup- 
port each other in whatever choices are 
made. My sister would probably never have 
chosen anyone I would have considered good 
enough just because of my protectiveness. 
But she's happy. 



That key phrase again. As long as she is 
happy and as long as she is not hurt, and as 
long as she can handle the problems that 
crop up, it's her life. She's my sister, so I'll 
support her. I'll accept Richard as part of the 
family, I'll accept and love my nephew and 
his brothers and sisters, I'll accept whatever 
she decides to do. 

So where does my uncle get off on not ac- 
cepting a member of MY family? Why does 
he think he's different or better than the rest 
of us? Why is he condemning my sister, a 
niece he has always seemed to care about, 
for a choice she considers to be in her best in- 
terest? Why is he splitting the family apart, 
hurting my grandmother, my mother and 
my sister in the process? 

I probably sound as intolerant as my uncle 
appears to be, I'm not sure what the dif- 
ference is, but when it comes to a member of 
my immediate family, I will not tolerate 
anyone who causes them pain. My mother is 
much more accepting. Again, she will do all 
she can to keep the family together. She will 
not alienate my uncle no matter the pain he 
causes. 

I don't have the answers. And I probably 
never will. But I do know that despite my in- 
itial misgivings about my sister's marriage 
and her life choices, she is my sister. And she 
deserves my support and respect for 
whatever choices she makes in her life. 

Because it is HER life, and she IS happy. 




fymjfa quqx notice, 

Mt ita letters in 

"jforJftlD WILSON •Rf.A&rVn' 

Cdn toe. rearranged to spell: 



■9ro/^T>Ff>tyr ) 
•IWSAs-statE p» 







Being organized no easy task 



There comes a time in all our lives when 
we are forced to participate in an action far 
from our nature — an action we do not enjoy 
or condone, but one thai is necessary to keep 
a thread of efficiency in our daily lives I took 
part in such an activity the other day — I 
cleaned my desk. 

I didn't want to, but I had lo. With each 
passing day, the search for my checkbook or 
car keys became a more challenging task. I 
realized the situation called for drastic ac- 
tion when I opened my top drawer and 
discovered its ingredients flush with the top. 
As I slipped my hand between the layers of 
"necessities,'' I noticed some things were not 
so necessary, at least not anymore. Much of 
the contents had outlived its usefulness and 
needed to be transferred to the little filing bin 
under my desk. Many of the objects I wanted 
to keep, but not in my drawer. 

I believe there is an adage that states 
something simitar lo, "With every decision 
one makes, three more arise." If there isn't 
such a saying, maybe I can be the originator 
of it 

With the decision made to separate the 
good from the bad, the old from the new and 
the useful from the useless, I was bombarded 
with new problems. "What am I going to do 
with the stuff I wanted to keep?" "Should I 
throw this away or keep it another 
semester?" To keep from having to answer 
these questions too soon, 1 decided to line, 
group and pile everything on my desk and 
take a complete, but cautious, inventory. 

I removed the contents just as an ar- 
chaelogist would unearth artifacts from a 
burial ground, carefully examining each 
business card, each coupon, each mat- 
chbook. 

I live in a fraternity and share a study- 
room with two gentlemen. The room has a 
long desk that is divided into three sections 
along one wall. As my mound of materials 



V* m 


RON 
HONIG 

Collegian 

Columnist 



grew, a stack of letters collapsed and slid 
across the boundary into my roommate's ter- 
ritory. My roommate eyed the assortment 
for a moment and returned to his work. I like 
people who say what they think, but I was 
glad he didn't. 

I ruffled through the mess, separating the 
cancelled checks from the drop-add slips and 
gathered the tiny notes informing me of a 
phone call or a borrowed book. Then I made 
the permanent decision to throw some things 
away. I tossed last year's programmer, an 
expired sweepstakes entry and various let- 
ters from my adviser I parted with an an- 
cient Collegian, an empty envelope and a 
receipt from Dillon's. 

I found a few items I wanted to keep as 
well: notes from friends, letters from 
sweethearts, grade cards and a ticket stub 
from a museum in Denver. If I ever put 
together a scrapbook, these are what I want 
in it — the everyday objects that pattern our 
lives. 

Luckily, I came upon a box in the top of my 
closet which, once emptied, served well as a 
depository for the memorabilia. 

1 guess people would call me sloppy and 
unorganized because I have a love for the tri- 
fle belongings in life. I don't like organized 
people. Well, it's not that I dislike them, I'm 
envious of them. Their desks are always 
clean and neat, their bookshelves in 
alphabetical order. They keep their shoes in 



the closet and separate the shirts from the 
trousers. An organized person never seems 
to be getting anything done, at least there is 
no evidence of it. No book left open to the last 
page read, no rough drafts scattered beneath 
their chair. 

Neat people's lives run too smoothly. They 
miss out on the little exciting periods in life 
like being late for class and not being able to 
find a comb and, thus, substituting a favorite 

cap. 

If God ever sends a wife my way, I hope 
she doesn't mind magazines on the floor, feet 
on the coffee table or fishing equipment in 
the bedroom. I hope she understands about 
the dog hair on the sofa and the muddy over- 
shoes on the rug. Surely she'll realize I'm ter- 
minally lazy about returning items to their 
proper places and will not object to rearrang- 
ing the storage scheme of our house with 
each use of a screwdriver or coffee cup. 

Maybe someday if I watch and listen 
enough, I will pick up on the secrets of those 
neat and organized people, those who come 
to college with a clothes iron and expect to 
use it. Maybe if I model my life after one of 
these people — study when they study, do 
laundry when they do laundry and throw 
away what they throw away — someday I 
will be neat and well organized. So when I 
reach for a pencil, it will be sharp, and all my 
socks will have mates. 

I have a long way to go, because there are 
still glasses on my desk with rings of dried 
milk, and my fee card is history. Is it possi- 
ble somehow that people like me are not cut 
out for the tidy, smooth-running life*? Could it 
be we like being reminded of what we ate 
yesterday because it helps us decide what we 
want today? The more I consider the ques- 
tion, the more I like my lifestyle the way it is. 
I may have to live with old newspapers and 
wrinkled neckties, but my mess is mine, and 
it's home. 



Letter 

fust stay out of it 

Editor. 

Re: Tim Inman's guest column, "Abortion 
leaves many victims." in Jan 22 Collegian. 
Because no religion owns my soul, I am free 
to took at most any issue open-mindedly 
Abortion may cause guilt in some cases, but 
it does not in others. 

Like any other operation, it can be risky to 
the mother's health, though perhaps not as 



much of a risk as delivering a baby If you 
could see another point of view, you might 
see the growth of cells you call a baby as an 
unwanted growth, like a tumor, a cyst or a 
wart (not that babies are warts, tumors or 
cysts.) Removal of this unwanted growth of 
cells is the mother's decision not yours, mine 
or anyone else's and if not directly involved, 
we should all just butt out. 

Mark Houston 
junior In natural resource management 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

pertaining to matters of public interest 
are encouraged All letters must be 
typewritten or neatly printed and 
signed by the author and should not 
exceed 300 words. 

Letters may be brought to Kedzie 1 16 
or mailed to the Collegian Editorial 
Page Editor, Kedzie 103, 






■*wMiwmp 



-: 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Friday, January 23, 1117 



Marchers join to protest anniversary of legalized abortion 




SUH/Gary Lytic 
In imposition lo abortion, children carry a coffin symbolic of a dead child as demonstrators carry signs illustrating 
their point of view Thursday during a pro-life march through campus. 



Clubs in the Arts & Sciences College 

interested in being allocated 

by Arts & Sciences council 
must attend a mandatory meeting. 



Monday, Jan. 26 

7 p.m. 
Union Rm. 208 



By CHRIS HALL 
Collegian Reporter 



To mark the 14th anniversary of 
Roe vs. Wade, about 35 people mar- 
ched across campus Thursday in 
protest of the Supreme Court's deci- 
sion legalizing abortion. 

Pro-life demonstrators carried 
signs stating "Abortion is the 
ultimate child abuse" and "20 
million killed since 1973." 

"We want to create an awareness 
that abortion is legal through all nine 
months of pregnancy," said Tim In- 
man, junior in pre-law. "We hope to 
have our congressmen see that there 
are people against it, because they 
can change things with an amend- 
ment to the constitution to ban abor- 
tion." 

Inman is committee chairman for 
the march and a member of Great 
Commission Students, the K-State 
student organization of Great Com- 
mission Church, which planned the 
event. 

Members of Manhattan Right to 
Life and Dreamhouse Inc., a counsel- 
ing center for crisis pregnancies, 
also marched. 

"We hope to come across in a 
sincere manner to the women of 
K-State to let them know there are 
alternatives to abortion that would 
be better to them in the long-run," 
Inman said. 

Father Norbert Dlabal, of the 
Catholic Campus Ministry, said he 
joined the marchers because, "Our 
whole country has to leam to respect 
life a whole lot more. There is a 



cheapening of life from beginning to 
end. We need to change that." 

The march began at Weber Hall 
and wound through campus, ending 
in the Union Courtyard. 

Brad Schroeder, senior in 
engineering technology and presi- 
dent of Great Commission Students, 
opened the presentation sponsored 
by the pro-life groups 

"The purpose of what we are doing 
today is to educate the students, 
faculty and the community of 
Manhattan on the issues and realities 
of abortion We want them to en 
courage their congressmen to stop 
abortion," he said. 

Schroeder introduced the main 
speaker. Dr. Lauren Welch, a 



surgeon from Wamego. 

Welch talked about the medical 
aspects of abortion. He cited 
statistics on the number of women 
who have complications after the 
procedure. He spoke of both the 
physical and psychological effects. 

Welch's main point was that people 
are not warned about the possible 
side effects and complications. "If 
people were really well informed 
ahead of time, they would probably 
change their minds." he said. 

"I consider abortion medically in- 
advisable," Welch said. 

Dan Walter, a 1978 graduate of 
K-State and local businessman, in- 
vited the onlookers to sign a petition 
against legalized abortion. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, frktoy, January 23, 1M7 



Study finds teens sexually active 



By BRUCE DOLSBERRY 
Collegian Reporter 

While research by a pair of 
K -State professors found that teens 
are sexually active, the resear- 
chers say that teen-age expecta- 
tions about relationships are the 
important part of their findings. 

The question of teen-age sexuali- 
ty was posed by David Wright and 
Howard Barnes, assistant pro- 
fessors in the Department of 
Human Development and Family 
Studies, They conducted the study 
in Her i nut on. 

Barnes and Wright surveyed 75 
percent of the middle school and 
high school students and 43 percent 
of parents of elementary, middle 
school and high school students. 

They discovered the majority of 
students surveyed are sexually ac- 



ed students would like more infor- 
tive. Moreover, most didn't use 
birth control devices the first time 
they had intercourse. 

In addition, the research reveal- 
mation about relationships, birth 
control and sexually transmitted 
diseases. 

However, Wright said the 
significance of the report is its fin- 
dings about what teens want out of 
a relationship with the opposite 
sex 

"What teens really want in a 
dating relationship is companion- 
ship, support, communication and 
affection," Wright said. "Among a 
list of 28 factors, having a sexual 
relationship was near the bottom 
in importance for both males and 
females." 

Although Barnes and Wright are 
in the preliminary stages of data 



analysis, they have identified a 
need for teens to distinguish bet- 
ween sex and affection. 

"Teens may have trouble 
separating sex and affection," 
Wright said. "They need to develop 
relationship skill. They need to 
learn how to say 'no. ' Teens need to 
learn how to identify their own 
needs (and) learn how to meet 
those needs." 

Students said their parents' opi- 
nions are important to them, and 
they value relationships with their 
dating partners' parents. 

"Parents and teens want to talk 
to each other about these issues, 
but they're not communicating," 
Wright said." 

Barnes and Wright said they 
hope to continue their research and 
have applied for a grant to 
replicate the study in other towns. 



Germany to be 'home' for students 



By STACK Y CAMPBELL 
Collegian Reporter 

Most Americans consider Ger- 
many a foreign country, but seven 
K-State students will call the country 
"home" for a year 

These students will participate in 
the exchange program between 
Justus-Liebig University in Giessen, 
West Germany . and K-State next 
fall. 

Students participating in the Euro 
pean Exchange Program are Jen- 
nifer Bell, sophomore in political 
science; Cheryl Cailleux, graduate 



student in French; Susanne Leipold, 
graduate student in theater; Scott 
Miller, junior in English; William 
Rees, senior in accounting; Todd 
Schultz, junior in journalism and 
mass communications; and Ronald 
Stelter. senior in German. Another 
"student, Margaret Sellers, junior in 
civil engineering, will attend a 
university in Zurich, Switzerland. 

John Noonan, associate dean of the 
graduate school, said K-State will 
receive five students from Justus- 
Liebig next fall in the exchange. 

A committee of representatives 
from all colleges except the College 



of Veterinary Medicine reviewed 
students' essays and interviewed 
those applying for the exchange, 
Noonan said. 

"The competition was keen," 
Noonan said. "Through the essay, 
we looked for individual imagina- 
tion, and through the interview, we 
focused on the sophistication of each 
student." 

The students chosen will be re- 
quired to study in German, so it is 
important for them to be proficient in 
the language, he said. Good grades 
played a role in selecting those who 
attend as well. 



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County to computerize 911 system 



By I .OH I LINDSTROM 
Colle gian Reporter 

Riley County will see an improve- 
ment in its 911 emergency number 
by the end of the summer or early 
next fall, said Dan Harden, Riley 
County Public Works Director. 

Harden said the 14-year-old system 
currently in use, an electronic 
device, is one of the first systems us 
ed in Kansas. 

The police department receives an 
average of 430 emergency calls per 
month and the present system is not 
as productive as it should be, he said. 

"The system is almost homemade, 
and so many new parts have been ad- 
ded to it," Harden said. 

Harden said the new system, 
developed by Southwestern Bel) 
Telephone Company, is computeriz- 
ed with automatic identification and 
automatic locating indicator 
devices. The new system will allow 
the police department to trace the 
address and phone number of the 
calling party in case they "panic and 
hang up the phone," Harden said. 

The new computer system will also 
feature a notation box that will carry 
extra information about a company 
or business, not available to the 
police or fire departments currently, 
Harden said. For example, he said 
the new system would relay informa- 
tion like if room in a burning building 
contained toxic chemicals. 

"The fire department would know 



to go to that certain room first. The 
extra information could save time at 
a fire or emergency," Harden said. 

Interest in the new system 
developed when the 911 committee 
learned "the technology was 
available to solve the problems with 
the present system," he said. 

The committee, consisting of peo- 
ple from the Riley County Police 
Department, the Riley County Fire 
Department, the ambulance service 
and consumers, knew that Sedgwick 
County had the new system installed 
and was having success with it, he 
said. 

The cost to replace the old system 



and install the new one is $90,000, 
Harden said. The money for the 
system comes from a 1 percent 
telephone tax on phone bills. 

The new system will serve 
residents on the Southwestern Bell 
Telephone system, Harden said. The 
local 911 emergency number covers 
those telephone numbers with the 
532, 537, 539 and 776 prefixes, exten- 
ding to rural and some Pottawatomie 
County residents, he said. 

"Southwestern Bell needs time to 
build a data base of the phone 
numbers and addresses of Riley 
County residents and install the new 
system," Harden said. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Friday, January 23, 1987 - 7 



Denver, Giants plan on having Super game 



Local experts 
dispute about 
Bowl winner 



By RON RENO 
C ontributing Writer 

Since almost everyone has of- 
fered predictions on Sunday's Super 
Bowl matchup between the Denver 
Broncos and the New York Giants, 
it seemed only right that the Col- 
legian ask the local "experts" — 
members of K-State's football team 

— how they foresee the outcome. 
Not surprisingly, the Giants — 

favored in almost all betting circles 

- were chosen by the Wildcats as 
the overwhelming favorites. Of the 
13 K-State squad members 
surveyed, 10 selected the NFC 
champions to prevail in Pasadena, 
citing the Giants* suffocating 
defense as the primary reason. 

"I think their defense and 
Lawrence Taylor are going to pound 
on (Denver quarterback John) 
Elway bad," said offensive tackle 
Chad Faulkner. 

"Lawrence Taylor, he's the 
reason (New York will win)," said 
defensive tackle Kevin Humphrey 
of the Giants' linebacker, who was 
recently tabbed as the NFL Player 
of the Year. 

Taylor leads a defense that has 
drawn several comparisons to the 
defense of last year's world cham- 
pion Chicago Bears squad. New 
York completely shut down two 
high-powered offenses in its two 
playoff victories, limiting the San 
Francisco 49ers and Washington 
Redskins to a combined three points 
in those games. 

While the Giants - who are 
favored by almost two touchdowns 
in some areas of the country — rely 
on their defense, the Broncos are 
counting on the sometimes brilliant, 
sometimes not, Elway to lead them 
to a Super Bowl title. 

"I think Elway will be a big fac- 
tor," said linebacker Scott White, 
who gave the Broncos the nod. 
"He'll run and scramble, and they 
won't be able to contain him." 

"Elway's hot," said linebacker 
David Wallace, who also picked 
Denver "I think (Denver has) a 
pretty diverse offense ; they can run 
and. of course, they can pass." 

While most Bronco fans are pinn- 
ing their hopes on Elway's much- 
celebrated right arm. Giants' fans 
cite numerous reasons as to why 
New York will come out on top. 

The Giants team centers its of- 
fense on its 5-foot-6, All-Pro running 
back Joe Morris. Besides Morris, 
the Giants also have Phil Simms, 
who has finally proven himself to be 
a quality NFL quarterback and a 
talented offensive for Simms to 
work behind. 

Though the Giants field an 
average group of wide receivers at 
best, Simms does have the con- 




Super Bowl' XXI Sunday is a day fur many K-State students to gel together 
and cheer fur llieir favorite. The Denver Broncos and the New York (.kid is 



Stalf John La Barge 

will battle fur the lille ol NF1. Champion and the coveted Vine* l^omhiirdi 
Trophy . 



siderable talents of All-Pro tight 
end Mark Bavaro to rely on. 

K-State running back Tony Jor- 
dan is one of those who said the 
Giants simply have too many 
weapons for the Broncos to over- 
come. 

"I think (New York's) defense is 
real stable,.. (and) I think they have 
a real good offense now that Phil 
Simms is playing well. I just think 
they're going to overpower 
Denver," he said. 

"(New York's) on a roll right 
now," said offensive tackle Rockey 
Dvorak. "Their offense and defense 



is a lot better. New York has been 
playing well all year; they're kind 
of like Chicago was last year 
Denver fell apart at the end of the 
year, and I don't think they can stay 
with the Giants." 

Bronco diehards, however, don't 
buy that line. They cite the game 
between Denver and New York 
earlier in the year, which the Giants 
won on a last-second field goal, as 
evidence. 

"1 think Denver outplayed them 
in New York. I think they've got 
some revenge coming,'' said 
linebacker Matt Wallerstedt. 



Though largely overlooked 
because of all the hype surrounding 
the Giants' defense, the Broncos 
also boast a respectable defense of 
their own led by All-Pros Rulon 
Jones and Karl Mecklenberg. 

Wallace said Denver's defense is 
"unbelievable." and then added, 
"with Mecklenberg and Rulon 
Jones, they're tough ." 

Though our "experts" forwarded 
plenty of other theories and pro- 
gnostications, the majority seemed 
to believe Super Bowl XXI boils 
down to a battle between Elway and 
the Giants' defense. 



Betting that opened big on the 
New York Giants has shifted as 
Super Bowl XXI ncars, with bettors 
flocking to the side of the Denver 
Broncos as the point spread closed 
slightly at most legal sports books 

What once was a 10-point spread 
favoring the Giants dropped to nine 
points Thursday at most Las Vegas 
books — and may fall lower unless 
some hoped-for New York money 
comes in before Sunday's game 

Sports book operators say the ear- 
ly enthusiasm about the Giants has 
faded somewhat as bettors take a 
closer look at the game. 



Football fans 
plan to party, 
enjoy corttest 

By BILL LANG 

Sports Writer 

Super Bowl Sunday: a day that 
brings America to a virtual stand- 
still. 

Some Americans will be in cram- 
med bars in front of big-screen 
televisions. Others may choose to 
spend the game with friends in front 
of a smaller screen, waiting to see 
who will win the coveted Vince 
Lombard! Trophy along with the ti- 
tle of Super Bowl champions. 

Last year, we witnessed the 
Chicago Bears and the likes of its 
radical leader, Jim McMahon, run 
rampant over the New England 
Patriots 46-10 as countless numbers 
attended parties wearing 
McMahon-style headbands and 
sunglasses trying to catch the at- 
mosphere that surrounded Super 
Bowl XX. 

As the New York Giants and the 
Denver Broncos prepare for battle 
Sunday in Pasadena. Calif., there 
isn't a flashy character such as 
McMahon or a media -dominating 
team such as the Bears. 

But many K-Stale students are 
still preparing to at least watch 
Super Bowl XXI 

Terry Fairchild, Goodnow Hall 
resident, said nothing special is 
planned for Sunday at Goodnow 

"We're not going to do anything 
spectacular,"* Fairchild said 
"We re just going to get together 
and have few snacks and a few 
.beverages and enjoy the game." 

Most fraternities contacted said 
they will host parties with their lit- 
tle sisters. 

■We'll be having a pre-game par- 
ty with some food and beverages,'' 
said Brian Hamilton, social chair- 
man for the Acacia fraternity 
"We'll also be giving prizes to those 
who come closest to guessing the 
right score." 

Some Aggieville businesses are 
attempting to cash in on the hype of 
the SUper Bowl and will be hosting 
"Super Parties." Others will re- 
main closed 

One firm chose not to do anything 
The owner said, "We aren't going to 
do a thing, except maybe watch a 
little bit of the Super Bowl and then 
see what else is on." 

One local establishment will be 
having an all-you-can-eat buffet 
The game will be aired on a seven- 
tiKit screen, and the room will be 
divided in half to accommodate 
Giants and Broncos followers 

So, with food in one hand, and a 
preferred beverage — maybe an 
Orange Crush would suffice? — in 
the other, sit back and join millions 
of other viewers and listeners and 
enjoy Super Bowl XXI. 



OU to test conference-leading Wildcats 



By JENNY (IIACLK 
Sports Writer 



The first sellout crowd of the 
season will be on hand Saturday at 
Ahearn Field House to watch Big 
Eight Conference-leading K-State 
men's basketball team take on 



Oklahoma, ranked 11th by The 
Associated Press and 9th by United 
Press International. 

K-State *• last victory in the series 
came Jan. 20, 1982 - 10 meetings ago 
- when K-State won 47-42, in Ahearn 
Field House. The Sooners have won 
four straight in Manhattan, but the 



'Cats are 8-0 at home this season. 

"Ahearn's great. It will be a great 
game Saturday," reserve guard 
Mark Dobbins said. "As to having a 
full house, it's got to be worth 
something - I hope. (Our fans are) 
the best fans anywhere." 

K State, 13-3 and 3-0 in the con- 




smff Jrtf Tutllc 

Un ,ver S i.y «f Oklahoma forward Barry. Kennedy, right, b aver.^l^ JJMP«« * ■*• "Cranked 
Sooner*, who will battle Big Eight leader K -Stale Saturday in sold-out Ahearn Held House. 



ference, sits alone at the top of the 
Big Eight heap and rides the crest of 
a five-game winning streak into the 
3:10 p.m. contest that will be televis- 
ed by Raycom Sports. 

Both teams are coming off im- 
pressive victories Wednesday night. 
The Cats defeated Colorado 92-61, 
while the Sooners, 13-3 and 2-1, 
pounded intrastate rival Oklahoma 
State 94-67, 

The Sooners posted their biggest 
win of the season Jan. 17 when they 
defeated then No. 1 University of 
Nevada-Las Vegas 89-88. 
Oklahoma's win over UNLV was the 
first ever for a Billy Tubbs-coached 
Sooner team over a top-ranked team. 

"For us to win we have to shoot 
well and we've got to keep them from 
running and try to keep up your usual 
tempo," Dobbins said "It's hard to 
run and keep another team from run- 
ning." 

Besides having identical records, 
OU and K-State also appear to match 
up well on paper. 

Oklahoma averages 91.3 points per 
game overall and 79,5 points in con- 
ference play K-State averages 83.1 
points per game overall and 91 points 
in conference play. 

Defensively, the Cats have the 
edge. They have allowed their op- 
ponents 70.9 points per game overall 
and 69.3 points in conference play. 
The Sooners. meanwhile, have allow- 
ed their opponets 80.8 points per 
game overall and 80 5 points in con- 
ference play. 

K State also has the edge in bench 
play. The 'Cats' bench is leading the 
Big Eight, averaging 26.7 points per 
game. Oklahoma's bench is in fourth 
place with an average of 19.3 points 
per game. 

Individually, both teams have four 
starters who average in double 
figures. 



State's rivals to clash 
in Big Eight matchup 



By The Collegian Staff 



Make no mistake about it. the 
25th-ranked Lady Cats are on a 
roll and the players know it. 

"We're on a winning team, and 
when you are on a team tike this, 
it makes you confident," said 
Amy Davidson, a 5-foot-9 
freshman reserve guard/ for- 
ward. 

K-State, after a 71-61 win 
Wednesday against Colorado at 
Boulder, has won five consecutive 
games and nine of its last 10. The 
Lady Cats, 14-3 overall and 3-1 
against Big Eight Conference op- 
ponents, couldn't have picked a 
better time to get hot because 
they host intrastate rival Kansas 
at 5 p.m. in Ahearn Field House 

Kansas, 9-9 and 2-2 in con- 
ference play, has won the last two 
meetings in Ahearn Field House. 



But the Lady Cats have yet to lose 
at home this season. 

Normally, a Kansas-K-State 
match up would attract much at- 
tention but the women's game 
seems to have been "lost in the 
shuffle" because the conference* 
leading K-State men are hosting 
nationally ranked Oklahoma the 
same day. 

Sue Leiding paces the Lady 
Cats with an average of 15.2 
points per game. Carlisa Thomas 
needs just 12 rebounds to become 
the Lady Cats' all-time career 
leading rebounder, and Susan 
Green needs five assists to take 
over fourth on the K-State career 
assist list. 

Kansas, coached by Marian 
Washington, is led by three-time 
letter winner Jackie Martin with 
10.3 an average of 10.3 points per 
game. 



Manning paces Kansas 
by Cornhuskers, 86-65 



By The Associate d Press 

LAWRENCE - Danny Manning 
scored 23 points, including 17 in the 
second half, as Kansas coasted to its 
43rd straight victory at home Thurs- 
day night with an 8645 rout of Big 
Eight Conference rival Nebraska 

The victory gave the Jayhawks a 
4-1 conference record and moved 
them to 12-5 overall. The Cor- 
nhuskers fell to 1-3 in the Big Eight 



and II 6 overall 

Manning, who scored just six 
points in the opening half, took con- 
trol for Kansas in the first minutes ot 
the second period The 6-foot-ll for- 
ward scored 11 of Kansas' first 16 
points in the period. 

Guard Cedric Hunter hit two free 
throws with 7 : 30 left to put Kansas on 
top by 21 points, 71 50 

Kansas had the game well in hand 
early, jumping out to a 11 point lead. 



m^ 



KANtAt STATE COLLEGIAN, Friday, Jinwry ». 1W 



Pennsylvania official commits suicide after talking to press 



By The Associated Press 



HARRISBURG. Pa. - Penn 
sylvania's treasurer, facing jail for 
defrauding the state, proclaimed his 
innocence al a news conference 
Thursday but said "It's too late for 
me," then pulled a pistol from a 
manila envelope, put it into his 
mouth and killed himself. 

R. Budd Dwyer died instantly after 
he fired a single shot from a .357 
Magnum pistol in front of two dozen 
horrified reporters, photographers 
and aides, said Dauphin County Cor- 
oner William Bush. 

"No. No! Budd, don't do this!" 
several people gathered in Dwyer s 
office suite in the state Finance 
Building screamed just before he 



pulled the trigger. 

Moments after the shot rang out, 
someone cried, "Dear God in 
heaven." 

Dwyer s son Rob, 21, said his 
father had given the family no in- 
dication of what he intended to do. 

"We're pretty broken up," he said, 
his voice cracking during a telephone 
interview. He said he heard the news 
at home with his mother, Joanne, 47, 
and sister, Dyan, 18. 

On Wednesday, the attorney 
general's office had declared that 
Dwyer. 47, vould be out of office as 
soon as he was sentenced Friday in 
federal court in Williamsport Before 
that, Dwyer. a Republican who had 
been elected to his second term in 
1984, had planned to stay in office on 



a leave of absence without pay until 
his appeal was resolved. 

A jury in December convicted 
Dwyer of awarding a K6 million 
contract to a firm called Computer 
Technology Associates in return for 
a promised $300,000 payoff. No 
money ever changed hands. 

He faced up to 55 years in prison 
for five counts of mail fraud, four 
counts of interstate transportation in 
aid of racketeering, one count of per- 
jury and one count of conspiracy to 
commit bribery. 

At the news conference, Dwyer 
read a rambling, half-hour state- 
ment in which he said he was a vic- 
tim of the legal system. 

He held up his hands when he saw 
some television cameramen start 



taking down their equipment and 
told them: "You don't want to take 
down your equipment yet." 

Then, he reached into tiie large 
envelope, telling those people near- 
by, "Stay away, this thing will hurt 
someone." 

Fred Cusick, a reporter for the 
Philadelphia Inquirer, was in the 
front row at the time of the shooting. 

"I should have run and grabbed 
him when he pulled out the 
envelope," Cusick said. "! knew that 
was it." 

Just before he pulled the gun, 
Dwyer called acting treasurer 
Donald L. Johnson and two other 
aides to his side. He handed each of 
them sealed envelopes that he said 
contained instructions for them to 



read later. 

Treasury spokesman Duke Hor- 
shock told reporters after the 
shooting that "the expectation was 
that he was using this forum to 
resign his position... He said he was 
going to give an update on his 
status." 

Dwyer's 19-page typed statement 
made no reference to resigning. At 
several points he used phrases like 
as "it's too late for me" and "as my 
political career draws to a close." 

In his statement, Dwyer criticized 
the media, acting U.S. Attorney 
James West, who prosecuted his 



Dick Thornburgh 
District Judge 



case, former Gov 
and senior U.S. 
Malcolm Muir. 

Dwyer also said he was "being 
punished for a crime I did not com- 
mit." 

West called the shooting tragic but 
said he stands by the government's 
case and the jury's verdict. 

Gov. Robert P. Casey, who suc- 
ceeded Thornburgh this week, said in 
a statement that he and his wife "are 
profoundly shocked and saddened. 
Mrs. Dwyer and her children are in 
our prayers." 



Agronomy society presents award to professor 



f ENJOY YOUR LEISURE TIME! 

Discover LAUNDRY UNO 

Drop off your laundry ... we'll do it for you 
7 days a week! 



Ry ANGIE SMITH 
Collegian Reporter 



The American Society of 
Agronomy honored Gerry L, Posler, 
professor of agronomy, as the reci- 
pient of the 1986 Agronomic Resident 
Education Award. 

The society gives the award to the 
most outstanding applicant based on 
the many contributions a person 
makes through teaching, Posler 
said. 

Although Polser has received 
many awards, he said he believes the 
ASA Resident Education Award is 
the most prestigious and exciting 
award in his leaching career. 

"The ASA Resident Education 
Award is represented by all your 
contributions and hard work with 
students," he said. 

"Posler is an outstanding teacher 
and is highly regarded by his peers," 
said George Ham, professor of 
agronomy and head the Department 
of Agronomy 

"He is very enthusiastic," Ham 
said. "Students have a desire to 
learn because they are in the 
classroom with htm." 




LAFLIN 

Books 6f Copies 

•4* self-service copies 
•full service copy center 

•Resume service 

OPEN DAILY 
M-F8-9 Sat 9-5 Sun 12-9 

FirstBank Center Demson & Claflin 

776-3771 



£W%V*Y» v*v*vw»>y 




SUPER 

SUNDAY 

FUN! 

— I/if 

LUNCH 
DINNER & 
FOOTBALL 



•Smivlng Noon* p.m. 
•Homomadm Grltfo 

Choicwm 
* Watch Thw Qmmol 




"He deserves it. He does so much 
for the department; he is a real 
asset," said Scott Dorsch, senior in 
agronomy and president of the 
Wheat State Agronomy Club. 

Posler said he was nominated by a 
colleague, Steve Thien, professor of 
agronomy. Posler's resume was sent 
to the ASA committee, which made 
the final decision on the award He 
received the award Dec. 3 at the ASA 
banquet held in New Orleans. 

Posler is also the assistant head for 
instruction in the agronomy depart- 
ment. His duties include coor- 
dinating all agronomy teaching ac- 
tivities, scheduling, scholarships and 
helping with new student programs. 
Posler teaches two classes: Crop 
Growth and Development and 
Forage Management. 

Posler is the coach of the K State 
Collegiate Crops Judging Team. He 
has advised many student groups in- 



cluding the Plant Science Club, 
Alpha Zeta and the Agriculture 
Council. He is currently the 
Secretary of the Collegiate Crops 
Contest Coach Committee. 

Posler said he believes outstanding 
teachers must be very 
knowledgeable and current in sub- 
ject matter, well organized, en- 
thusiastic, able to communicate ef- 
fectively, fair, and above all, "con- 
cerned" that students learn. 

Posler has been at K-State for 12 
years. He received his bachelor's 
and master's degrees from the 
University of Missouri and his doc- 
torate from Iowa State University. 



Posler has received numerous 
teaching awards including the Na- 
tional Association of College 
Teachers of Agriculture Teacher 
Fellow and Outstanding Central 
Region Fellow awards in 1978. 

Polser received the Gamma Sigma 
Delta Teaching Award of Merit in 
1982, and the KSU College of 
Agriculture Outstanding Faculty 
Award in 1978, 1981 and 1986 He also 
received the Kansas State University 
Outstanding Teaching Award in 1983 



1 



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for same day wash-dry-fold laundry service. 

Dry cleaning and self service also available. 

Try our quick professional service, you'll be glad you did! 

2048 N. Turtle Creek Blvd. 776-1939 J 






Collegian Classifieds 
Cheap, but Effective 



Friday Night 

Fried Chicken or 
Spaghetti with Meat Sauce 
All You Can Eat 

Only $3.95 
with 
Salad Bar 



Saturday 

Gourmet Specials 

featuring 

Prime Rib or 
Steak & Shrimp only $5.95 

Open Sunday 8-3 



AGGIEVILLE 
FLOWERS 

MUG 

BOUQUET 

$750 

cash and carry 

12th & Laramie 

537-9549 MS 10-5 




Play the game of the future at 

BONKERS 

Next Competition 

Tues. 27th 9 p.m. 

Enter Your Team Now! 

College students enter FREE! 

Call 537-9591 I.D. Required 




"Purple and White" 
Swirl CONES and CUPS 



at 





Can't Believe h' 

YOGURT! 

Frozen Vbgurt Stores 



50% DISCOUNT 

(on purple & white swirl cones and cups 
excluding waffle cones) 

Saturday, Jan. 24 

to Everyone Wearing 

Something Purple! 

Enjoy the taste of Ice Cream but with 
one-fifth the fat and half the calories 

GO CA TS! 

We 'II be cheering you on to victory 
against Oklahoma 




FREE SAMPLES 

EVERY TIME 

YOU COME IN 



Open 11 a.m. -11 p.m. daily 

Noon- 11 p.m. Sunday 

705 N. 11th 

Nautilus Towers, Aggieville 



"Your choice: Quarter 

Pound CheeseBurger or 

reg. Roast Beef , only 

89<r 



"Ws make our 
sandwiches with mat 
good, old-fashioned 
taste, and now you can 
get them for a good. 
old-fashioned price" 

Offer good for a limited time. 



Offer good at 
artictpitiog Hardeca* 



I 



eaUn rants. 




Hardecr 






^^^r^^^mm^mm 



KANSAS STATt COLLEGIAN^ rld>¥. January 23, 1M7 



Airfares 

Continued from Page 1 

students don't know about it yet. 

Both Hurren and Hawse said that 
most sales are directed to Florida 
and Texas. 

Hurren said sales to older adults 
traveling to Las Vegas. Nev.. were 
also up. Howse added that most 
students still preferred driving to fly- 
ing when traveling to South Padre 
Island for spring break. 

Each airfare package is usually 
accompanied by restrictions, which 
could pose problems for some 
students who can't travel on short 
notice or certain days. 

Howse said lhat with some low 
rates, the airlines impose a 50 per- 
cent penalty for cancellation. Other 
restrictions could include three-day 
to two-month advance purchase 
agreements, no refund or exchange 
policies, and travel limited to certain 
days of the week and times of the 
day. 

Some air travelers do not realize 
that most airlines will waive 
penalties for legitimate emergencies 
such as a verified illness or death, 
Howse said. 



4 

Classifieds 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



01 

MARY KAY Cosmetics- Skin care -fll amour prod- 
ucts Free facial call Floris Taylor, 539-2070 Handi 
capped accessible (76 I1B) 

ASK ME aboul Mary Kay 1 Janet Milllken, 539 <J4&9 



VALENTINE S BAY la approaching! Order your gills 
from Avon today Con lac I Kara 532-1291. (83 84) 

PEOPLES GROCERY Co-op. Bit Colorado, is open 
lo everyone Wednesday and Friday 9 a m - 1 p m . 
and Saturday, 9 am -5 p.m 539 481 1 (83 87) 



FREE RENT In January. Large two-bedroom nicely 
decorated, dishwasher, disposal. No pels $350. 
deposit required 539-1*65 (76-881 

ONE BEDROOM, two-bedroom apartments, fur- 
nished or unlumithed. (nam furniture* Wastloop 
area Call 776-9(2* (7811) 



CAN YOU buy jeeps, cars. * x 4's sailed in drug raids 
lor under $1001 Call lor tacts today 602-837 3401 
Em S744 (83) 



FOB SALE-MISC 



or 



ATTENTION 



02 



ALL CAMPUS 

Social and Potluck 
Dinner 

Campus Religious 

Organizations 

Sunday, Jan. 25, 1 987 

International Student Center 

5:30-7:30 p.m. 

Sponsor: 

KSU Committee on Religion 



CHOCOLATE. VANILLA, strawberry Need 100 over 
weight people to try new improved he.bal weigh! 
control program wiib new Manors Nodrugs. no a* 
erdse. KM** guaranteed Call 776-5114 or 778- 
1465 |76 98) 

HERBALIFE INDEPENDENT distributor Sue us lor 
producla Catl 776 5114 or 776 1465 17698) 



03 



FOR HENT-MISC 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS-Correcling and non 
correcting Typewriter ribbons tor sale, service 
available Hull Business Machines. 715 North 
12lli Aggleville. 539 1413 (2710 



MONT BLUE 
APARTMENTS 

Leasing for June 
•Studio, 1 & 2 Bedroom 
Apartments 
and Townhouses 
•Close to campus 
539.4447 



BOSE 800 speakers. *600-one pair Atlas speaker 
stands, $150, Sansui receiver. 250 watt. $300 Call 
776-7689 (79-83) 
DINETTE VERY good condition 53*4271 (79-631 
EX-60 SILVER Reed typewriter Best oiler S3974U9 
(61-91) 



Ski the Summit 
over Spring Break 



L 



Looking for 
an apartment? 
Check Collegian 

Classifieds 



SPRING BREAK Hurry! Limited Space available at 
these number one collegiate beach and sk. dest, 
nations South Padre Island, Oaylona Beach, 
Steamboat Springs. Miami BeachlFort Laude. 
dale Mustang IslandiPorl Aransas Gaiveslon Is 
land and Fort Wallon Beach Call Sunehase Tours 
Central Spring Break Toll Free Hot Una todj, -or 
inlormallon and reservations-' -B0O-32 1-5911' 
179-98) 

THE COMPETITION has arrived! Now available on 
campus-Avon Beauty Products. Conlacl Kara 
532 3291 (83-87) 



Correctable typewriters for rent on 
a daily, weekly or monthly basis. 
See us lor all your typing needs. 
776-9469 

SI I ijMYcnvviinh. across Irnm DOS nfllet 



GARAGE, REASONABLY priced 1122 valuer 539- 
6126 (81-83) 



FOR RENT-AFTS 



Learn to Fly 

Information on ground school 

and flight training. 

Call Hugh Irvin at 

SW-1128 or 532-6311. 



04 



TWO BEDROOM lunuiy duplet: Fireplace, garage. 

west ol campus. $450 Call 539-4294 or 776-2536 

(69111 
NICE ONEbedroom apartment Water, (rash, twe- 

Ihirda gas pud. laundry (acidly Nice lor graduate 

student or couple Wflttmonlh 539-2482 alter 4 

p m (76 861 

SPACIOUS. TWO bedroom apartment in convenient 
downtown location Low utilities, air conditioned, 
covered garage Private and roomy Call 537-1072 
176 63) 



LIFE and UrtUttti 



by Doug & Dick 



?Ill»\R D .LftRRV, 
VOU'Re hJcrr Owe 
oe TUP WFATHEV 
,_ TWA.T LIVES 

WLieve. yaol 
vj*?v£ MET. 

V 



LuhA-t OBou'i p<\DM£V?; 
HCvU fflutrt MfitiEV 



ujhat mav v^pppeu to 

THE RBJ. 0R»l. RcgfCTS 
t/ 1 Million 8 s' rCMHMi 







5? 

T V,£ 6ftMK 



TWO BLOCKS wesl ol campus Ouiel, wall main 
lamed onebedioom apartment lor mature, non 
smoking Individual 1216 Lease No pels, water 
beds 537 9686 182-861 

NEAR CAMPUS at nice, guiel location-two 
bedroom duple*, available February 1 $270 Call 
537-0152 (77 881 

TWO BEDROOM iu>ury aparlmenl. block from cam 
pus Alao, live bedroom house, block and one-nail 
Irom campus 539-4383 (77 86) 

ROOMMATE NEEDED, share two bedroom (lur- 
nished). close lo campus. 350 N 16lh Rent rea 
sonable Call 539-4625 after 6pm (80-83) 

ONE BEDROOM apartment. $205/monlh Gas, heat, 
and water included leaee and deposit required 
Call 537 7794 evenings or weekends (7B-B8I 

TWO-BEDROOM lunury duplex. Iireplace, garage. 

west ol KSU Available now $425 Call 539-4294 

(78111 
THREE BEDROOM large lurnished apartment, near 

city park No pels, deposit required 1350 per 

month Call 539-7677 alter 3:30 pm (79-63) 

LARGE TWO bedroom, partially furnished basement 
apartment close to c ampue. 1411 Vista Lane Own 
entrance, no pets, parting (or two cars Depoe.it 
plus rent, available now Pay own electricity Phone 
2353550. Topeka 179 88) 

LARGE WARM, two-bedroom apartment, live blocks 
Irom campus No pets t3O0 Call 776-0181 (791(1 

TWO BEDROOMS, near city park New carpet »240 
bills paid 776-0605 or 539 4226 (79-83) 

SLEEPING ROOM one block Irom campus Reasona- 
bly priced, 539 0410 or 539-2857 (79-631 

NICE LY FURNISHED, one halt block/campus. 1260. 
bills paid Furnished, iwo block sJcampus. 1150 
plus part utilities, (month to- month lease ok) Iwo 
bedroom, lurnished two bloc* sicampus. 1250 
Call 539-1349 180-94) 




ODD BEAR. Congra I ulat i on a. I'm proud ol you' I love 

ya, Di (831 
ODD PLEDGES— The time has finally come, when 

you and Tn Delta will become one Congratula 

lions' Love, The Actives (831 

CATHY D -Happy Birthday"' Roses are red, violets 
are blue sugar 15 sweet and your roomies love you' 
Have a wondetul day, remember nuclear trogs go 
boom! (83) 

DAVE -HAPPY 191hl Hope ihis is one you II never 
forget Love. A W 183) 

TRI DELTA Kim. Through pledgeshp you survived 10 
reach your goal an active m Delia Tri The best is 
yet to come Love, Mom 183) 

LISA KAY Its chance that makes us sisters, but 
hearts thai make us friends Enioy ihis weekend' 
Love big sis Dana Marie 183) 

GOLDENHEARTS THIS Sunday s Ihe suparbowl so 
let s meet at the ole fraternity, bring your pillows 
and torn me lot a brews* > Welt meel a) 3 30 so 
don 1 be late: the parly as always, will definitely be 
great! Go Cowboys' 1831 



4 days ol skiing March 17-22 

SMS pcf (XTsuti induuVs irati^porliilion. 

\ nights liHlgmji iinil lilt paMMUi 
Fur mure itHiifiiuinnii mil Mar> Bhigin 

,11 .WfOtM 
Pliiltc Tntvt'l Center. K;ifts;is Cil) MO 

AKC GOLDEN retriever Male, nine weeks, all shots, 
wormed Call 539-2334, ask tor Shawn |8I 631 

OLD. UPRIGHT piano Good condition $150 or beat 

otter Commodore 1541 drive, monochrome mom 

tor. plus entras 1200 or best oiler 258 3564 eve 

rungs (81 831 
FOR SALE 40-gailon lish aquarium comes luiiy 

equipped For more information, call 776 7845 181 

65) 
KELSEY 12-channel miner, 1470, Mako bass guitar 

1160 Kustom powr amp. 1200 prices negotiable 

? 76 1925 (83-671 



ROOMMATE WANTED 



17 



Bloom {Zounfv~Z- 



By Berke Breathed 




ONLY 

Homestead Rental 

HAS ALL 

YOUR RENTAL NEEDS 
*Widc Selection 
*Low Monthly Rates 
♦Instant Credit 
♦Immediate Delivery 
*No Deposit 
♦Purchase Options 
♦Month to Month Lease 
♦No Hidden Costs 
♦Home Owned 
♦Friendly Service 
Furniture-TV-Appliances 

Horge^ad Rental 

537 S774 
2332 Skv-Vue Lane 



SPACIOUS LIMESTONE one -two bedrooms 1225. 

tree heal Ftllh and Osaga 4942756 evenings or 

532-6673 Jim (61 83) 
TWO BEDROOM— close to campus. Central air. lire 

place sun porch and garage Ca" 776 5925 181 631 
ADJACENT TO campus 1224 Bertrand Nice. Iwo 

bedroom with garage, washer and dryer We pay 

waler. traah Asking 1350 Call 537 1 745 or 537- 

4422 182 90) 
ONE BEDROOM furnished aparlmenl, bills paid. 

537 7313or 539 8401 One-half block Iromcampus 

183 87) 
QUIET HILLSIDE setting, third floor, nice older 

home, private entrance balh. kilchenelle. bed 

room study room Utilities paid. 1180. prefer 

femaie/graduale. 776-3454 (83l 
TWO BEDROOM aparlmenl. partially furnished. 

Close to campus with air conditioning Rem 1255 

Call 539 7253 183 881 



FOR RENT- HOUSES 



OS 



TWO-BEDROOM luxury duplei. Ineplace garage, 
west of KSU Available now 1425 Call 5394294 
(78111 



FOR SALE-AUTO 



06 



good condition Call 776 



Crossword 



Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

1 Hi-aiiir 
4 Ailurn- 

phobes 

fear 
7 — mii/non 
12 "Thf 

Ureatrst 



39 Rower's 

need 
41 Tailless 

4 Across 
45 Mideast 

name for 

I mil 
47 Prohibit 



13 l*ub order 48 TheaU'r 



14 Free 

15 Noise 

16 Western 
dealt end 

18 Nigerian 
nat ive 

19 ".laws" 

In-, I. si 

20 Metallic 
Heme m 

22 Literary 

eollr'r 
tit in 

23 — Mnier 
27 CIAs 

ured 
pressor 

29 Hob"". 
trans 
ixirler 

31 San 
Antonio 
landmark 

34 Not :l% 

confined 

35 Pugilism 

37 Singer 
Yoko 

38 Business 
VIP 



DOWN 

1 Spanish 
city 

2 Excuse 

3 Western 
tree 

4 City ears 

5 Island 
greetings 

6 I.K I. Tor 
one 

7 Criticism 
eolloq. 

8 Charged 
bit 

9 Actress 
Mvrna 

10 Within: 
prefix 

1 1 Di'i niiitl 
liasi' 

17 Fiddler. 
tor one 
21 Humorous 40 Pseudo- 

Solution time: 28 mlna. W" 

related 

44 Roentgen's 
discovery 

45 Distantly 

46 Warm up 
48 Cote try 

49 ( altfnr 
nia fort 

50 SlriK'k nut 

51 — 
ti't'lmk 

Yesterday's answer 1-23 lump* 



take 

52 Kggs 

53 tJarne site 

54 In the 
manner of 

55 The — 
of the 

IjOt'USt" 

56 Danger 
mis snake 

57 Ending 
for on 
or off 

58 City 
trains 



23 Math 
prop 
osittiui 

24 Watch 
display 
type 

25 West of 
Holly 

Will ill 

26 Time 
table 
altbr. 

28 Ham, to 
Noah 

30 Possess 

31 Honest 
Tellfiw 

32 Hagel 
topper 

33 Fire 
36 Links 



past ime 

37 Spit 




Wim™ 

v^\majam. . 




CRYPTOQUIP 


1 23 

PAPGPRTTK COWYLZ HMV'G 


HLXYVM- YPMALZ- XMOYO 


liVOTT HRAG WVM CVT 


Y 


V Z R K 



Ye»terd«y'« Cryptoqulp: SAID MERRY FISHERMAN. 
■THAT HUGE TROIT WAS WORTH WADING FOR 

TODAY!" 

Today's Cryptoquip clue: A equals N 



NOVA 1977 lour doors 
3806 (78831 

1980 MUSTANG, four cylinder turbo, lour speed. 24 
mpg. good condition 12,400 Call 5373697 eve- 
nings 17943) 

1984 FORD Escort GL Four door, automatic power 
steering, power brakes from wheel drive, ail. AM 
FM. cruise, rear window delroaler, cloth interior, 
low miles 539-4271 |79-83l 

1980 CHEW Monia power sleenng. power braKes, 
air. aulomatic transmission Low miles, good con 
dili on Call evenings. 532 3661 180-84) 

1979 VW Rabbit. AlyliFM, cassette rear window da 
logger, good mpg Runs great Call 537-388! alter 
5 30pm (81-831 

1986 FORD F150 4x4 351 V8 4B, aupercab Low 
mileage Best oiler 539-7409 181 91) 

1977 GOLD Volkswagen van Encellent condllion 
12,300 238-8092 |B285! 



DOD Guitar Effects 
30% Off 

327 Poyniz 776-7983 

HE IP WANTED .13 

PROFESSIONAL COUPLE m Kansas City Missouri 
seeking person locare tor 15 month old Flattaun 
dry and prepa'alion ol evening maat Room, board, 
salary.phone. TV. Plaza location Call collect, 816- 
926 2020 or 816-444-2885 (76451 

EARN 1480 weekly -J60 per Hundred envelopes 
stutfed Guaranteed Homeworkers needed lor 
company project stulling envelopes and assem 
burg materials Send stamped, self-addressed an 
velope to JBK Mailcompany, PO Bo« 25 52 Cas- 
taic California 91310 (76102) 

AIRLINES CRIilSELINES Hiring! Summer Career' 
Good pay Travel Cell lor guide cassette newsse- 
vicel (9161 944 4444 Eit »58 (76-135) 

DENTAL MTGIENIST Wanted must nave a gentle 
touch, enjoy the people part ot dental practice and 
be able to work as a team player m a busy denial 
practice full or part-lime opportunities available 
Send typewritten resume and handwritten latter ol 
introduction 10 PO Bon 704 Manhattan Kansas 
66502 178-83) 

PARTY ANIMALS to organize spring break vacations 
to Florida and Caribbean Earn tree trip and cash 
Call us now al 1 800 237 8308 days 0' (904) 441 
8687 evenings (79 831 

THE FONE Crisis Center is now accepting volun 
leers lor the sprmq semester For additional mlor- 
malion. please call 5326585 or slop By our lame in 
lb* Union on Friday 181 83) 

BENT FREE home to female lor watching ten year 
old daughter waakdey afternoons 778 7548 [81 
83) 

STUDENT RECEPTIONIST (Word Processor must be 
available to work especially Monday Wednesday 
and Friday mornings apprommateiy 20 hours per 
week, starling immediately Idaai tob for student 
with strong interest in computer field Students 
wild empiuymeni potential ol Iwo years and e<pe 
nence win microcomputer application packages 
will be given preference Flanking factors such as 
GPA. paid work e« penance, acquaintance with mi 
crocomputers. and longevity potential will be con 
Sidered Submit appHcaHons 10 Debra Hyde in 
Room A2 1 . Anderson Han Applications will be ac 
cepted until Monday January 26, 5 p m (82 84) 

PART TIME TO lull time bookkeepenaccounlant lor 
complete set ol records Computer skills hPiptui 
Send or deliver resume wiih references lo LERN 
1554 Hayes Drive. Manhattan KS 66502 Deadline 
Wednesday January 28 182 841 

HORTICULTURE STUDENT needed Part !. me plant 
clerk 12- 15 hours) week Must be available lo work 
Mondays a m Apply at Saleway Store vmage 
Plaza (82-S4) 

PRE SCHOOL instructors The City ol Manhattan 
needs part-time seasonal Pre School Instructors 
lo supervise and lead children in lecreational ac 
tiviltes Formal educational training In early child 
hood education or Pre-Scnool certification is pre 
lerred Apply al Ihe Personnel OHice. Ciiy Hall 
tfth and PoynU Applications taken until posi 
lions are lined EOE MiFiH |B3I 

THE KANSAS Cooperative Enlension Service has an 
opening tor student computer programmers The 
position is tor 20 hours per week liembte sched 
uie Applicants should be lamihar with one of the 
following languages Pascal C or PL'I Summer 
employment is a possibility depending on per 
lormance For more information contact Dr Steve 
Welch oi Mary Knapp at 21 lUmbarger phone 532 
7019 Application blanks are available Irom ihe 
above individuals or in Ihe Computer Science Of 
lice and will be taken during business nouis 
through February 6. 1987 (33-921 
NEED EXTRA caslV> Earn If 00s weekly al home 
Free details 1 Rush sell -addressed stamped eme 
lope Sterling Enterprises Bo« 1514 C Manhattan 
KS 66502 I83 87) 



TWO NON SMOKING lamales lo Share lour- 

bedroom, two-bath duple* Walk to campus Cen 

trai an conditioning, large yard, low utilities and 

auper low rent Can 776 3069 alter 5pm i76-83i 
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanlad To Share nice, clean 

lurnished apartment Own room no deposit pool 

Cico Pari- area dii 537 7191 (7683) 
MALE ROOMMATE needed -Across Slreel Irom 

campus it35imonin ptui utilities 776 9369 176 

88i 
NON SMOKING female Own roomrbalhroom 

Washer'dryer. »135 plus one third utilities 637 

1700 (7B83i 
ROOMMATE WANTED, male'femafe tor two 

bedroom house, 521 North lOTh SI70 month a» 

bills paid 537 7465 (78 S3) 
FEMALE ROOMMATE non smoking Individual 

room Campus East Call 776-0972 (alter 5 p m| 

179-831 
OWN ROOM, near campus, $.125 plus utilities 539- 

9343 179-83) 
NON SMOKING female roommate to share ihree 

bedroom house Own room. It 10 plus utilities 

(washer & dryeil 537 7463 (79-831 
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to share live bedroom 

house one-lillh utilities J155 month 776-2103 

180 83) 
NEED A place to live? Female roommate warned 
Apartment right across Irom campus 1120'month 
inegotiabie) plus one fourth utilities 539-8161 i80- 

B3I 

HOUSE NEEDS roommate fl35 Share eupw.ses 
Laundiy Call 776 9140 180 831 

WOULD LIKE lo share modern, bright, spacious, 
three bedroom apanmem near campus w'th one 
more roommate (male or lemaiei Rem aboul 1^.00' 
month Call Theo at 532-6387 o. 539*972 (80-83) 

MALE ROOMMATES-across Slreei Irom c* 

1615 Anderson Three bedrooms $105"' 

one-third utilities 7760827 mi 85) 
THREE MALES- To share two-bed room *; « 

S95Jmontrl. plus utilities Mom«- 438-5 '9* 

work -776-2340 after 4 pm (H38ti 

WANTED FEMALE roommate One halt tj ock I 

campus Own large room Iireplace SiOua'ripm 

utilities paid Musi see to app" i 

Bertrand 776^)306 (81-83) 
NON SMOKER OWN loom n^rl (•> 

negotiable 776-3833 belore i p m or iftfH ' 

181-851 
WANTED FEMALE roommate to share house Own 

bedroom and balh 1200 per month IfWHidM uW(- 

ties Phone 776 7541 182.841 
ROOMMATE WANTED J1 10 and one Ih.rd u «s 

Own washer/dryer Spacious M»« ot storage 776- 

6739 182 841 
MALE ROOMMATE — two-bedroom lurn.sherl Mc 

C»inLaj»e.#ifepiece Call 539 1157 atte-6pmi82 

86) 
MALE ROOMMATEiSi wanted to share a s>« bedroom 

house Toni enpense about $160 per month No 

deposit, available now 776 9222 I83a7 

ROOMMATE TO snare a iwo bedroom pari I 
n>snedap,irtmen1 Close lo campus with air cr.nd' 

l,on,ng -eniandut es $150 Can 5» 72?. J |83 

88i 

MALE ROOMMATE wanted lo share new apanmem 
Own room $i55per month plus utilities 537 4347 
(8387I 



18 



SERVICES 

PREGNANT' BIRTHRIGHT ca» help Free preg 

nancy lest Confidential Call 5379180 103 S 

Fourth St Suite 25 |1tfl 
PROMPT ABORTION and comracepuve services in 

Lawrence 913 841 5716 (3911) 
EXPERIENCED TVPtST-Sl 10'page Disc sio-ag* 

letter quality, reports thesis etc 532 596 1 or 537 

9205. Donnda (78 B8i 
TyplNGfWORD processing Data sheets resumes 

letters term papers dissertations etc Mrs Bur 

den 539-1204 (80891 
QUALiT yTTPlNG lor $f per page Contact Jn--- 

5839 (81 90) 
MARTtES TVPING Service Word ProcaWOi 10" 

Juliette 537 3314 Term papers theses disserta 

dons 8am loSpm 183 851 



WELCOMES 



LOST 



1< 



LOST UNDER S'» inches ol Snow Two keys attached 
to a wooden teddy bear key ring between Farreii 
and King Please call 539 2059 after 6 it found 
Thanks' > (83-841 



NOTICES 



15 



PREPARE FOR summer employment Enroll in the 
Community Education Advanced Litesaving class 
by Monday. January 26 and fulfill the prerequisite 
lor the Water Safely Instructor course The class 
will meel Mondays and Wednesdays from 5 30 
p m - 7 25 p m at the KSU natatonum until March 
4 Enroll al 316 Umberger or call 532 5566 182 63) 

NEED MONET for college'' Let us match you with 
scholarship and grant money lor which you can 
quality For more information write Student Finan 
ciat Aid Services 18 1 3 S W Chelsea Drive. Topeka. 
KS 66604 182-91) 

ATTENTION SCALPERS Need lour KU - KSU basket 
bait tickets tor February 4 Company coming 537 
7087 18387) 



PERSONAL 



16 



TO CUTE blonde m royal blue coat entering Blue 
mont Hall Wednesday about 1 2:30 Almost ran over 
you m the parking lot and again inside We e« 
changed smilas but would like to meet if available 
Rup Dark haired guy >n giay RX7 I83-84I 

CHERYL B - Tonight you can finally be yoursell at 
Buthweekera Have your drinks on us Tout room 
■as, J. N. R I83I 

HEY SPANKY-Happy 24th birthday' See ya Sunday' 
(Love the Stache'l- Love. Buckwheat (831 

DOUG- 1 cant wan to go hunling this weekend 
Love. C L (831 

FEEL THE Phi Kap ditterence, Saturday night Little 
Sifter Rush Party Thousands of women surveyed, 
we've won the taste test Phi Kapa-the new gen- 
eration 1631 

AZD PLEDGES-from rusheaa which you ware, lo 
awesome pledge* which you ve been, the time haa 
gone so last, new initiates you will be al laal XI 
Love, The Act ivea 183) 

ODO LISA M Initial ion Is almost oyer |u*l wall 
until tonight! You've done a great iob sweetie' I'm 
to gled you re my dot 1 1 love you ' Amy |B3| 

DOD SUSIE-The atars and enjtcenta will lead you 
tonight to a aoeciei night that you'll save Ml your 
heart Soon your dreams will come I nit, aa a Tn 
Delta sitter I will call you Lowe. Men (83) 



WELCOME STUDENTS' Fust Christian Church 1 15 
Courthouse Pla/a Church School 9 45 a m . Wor 
snip 8 30 and H am Mimsle-s Ben Ouerleldt 
539 8685 Sue Amyv 776-0025 TranipolWHOn lo 
cnu<ch-776.8790alter9am i83l 

CHURCH OF the Nazarena 1000 Fremont Sunday 
School 945 am Morning Woiship <P50am 
Evening Sewce 6pm Prayer Service Wednes- 
day 7pm |B3) 

ST UJKE S Lutheran Chuicn (Missouri Synodl Sun 
sel and North Delaware welcomes students to ser 
vices Saturday at 6 p m and Sunday al Band 10 4"i 
am (Abie classes 9 30am Sunday Fellowship 6 
p m (831 

TRINITY PRESBYTERIAN -Worship Service 10 45 
a m Sunday School 9 30 am For rides lo church 
call Howard Phillips 537-847Bot the Church ol lice 
539-3921 1831 

WESTVIEW COMMUNITY Church, 3001 Fort Riley 
Blvd invites you lo worship with them Sunday al 
8 30 and 10 45 a-m Sunday School classes. 8 30 
and to 30a m Coilegeeiaas meals at 9 a m at Uni 
versily Inn lower level For College Care Cell and 
Bible Studies contact 53*5369 For any add' 
1 1 onai information, call 537 7173 (83l 

St. Francis Episcopal 
Sundays 5 p.m. 
Danforth Chapel 

(Anglican) 
537-0593 

WELCOME STUDENTS to Ihe Manhattan Mennomle 
Fellowship We meet at 9 30 am lor Sunday 
School and f 30 a m lor worship al Ihe Ecumen 
ical Christian Ministries building at 1021 Denison 
(the while building with the two red door*) 1*3) 

WELCOME STuOeNTS-Grace Bapuel Church 
2901 Dickens, welcomes you to Worship Service, 
fl 30 and 1 1 a. m and Sunday School. 9 45am Um. 
varsity Class meets at 9 45 «.m Bob Burion 
teacher Evening Service. 6 pm. Horace Brelstorti 
Pastor Ken Edtger. Asst Paetoc 537-8585 For 
transportation daytime call 776-0424 (83) 

MASSES AT Catholic Student Center 711 Denison. 
Sunday 9 30 » m. 1 1 a,m and 5pm Saturday eve 
nmgat 5 p.m. Daily Mats n 4 30 p m. Conleanont 
daily before Maat and Saturday at 3 30 P m (831 

COLLEGE HEIGHTS Baptist Church SBC. 2221 Cor 
lege Heights Road College Bible Study. 930 a m 
Sunday Worship, 8 15 and 11 a m Cftureh Training 
8pm Sunday Evening Veoflhip. 7pm Wednes 
day Evening Prayer Service 7 p m Phone 537 
7744 (831 

FIRST LUTHERAN. 930 PoynU (537 65321 Welcome 
students lo worship service al 8:30 and 11am 
Sunday School 9 40 a m (S3) 

ST PAULS Episcopal Church— 6M» and Poynli Com 
munlon is celebrated on Sunday at 8 am (Rile D 
■nd at 10 30 a.m. (Rite 111 Por transportation can 
776 9427 (831 

BLUE VALLEY Memorial United Methodist Church 
835 Church Avenue Sunday School 9 t5 a m 
Morning worship. tO30 a m 53*6790 (83l 



w 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Friday, January 23, 1SS7 



Foes of death penalty to present forum 



By DERON JOHNSON 
Collegian Reporter 



A forum in opposition to the death 
penalty will be presented tomorrow 
from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Big 
Eight Room of the Union, said Sally 
Beaman, secretary of Amnesty In- 
ternational of Manhattan, one of the 
groups that will be represented. 

Other groups involved in the forum 
include the Kansas Coalition Against 
the Death Penalty, the Mennonite 
Church, the League of Women 
Voters, the National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored People, 
the American Civil Liberties Union 
.ind the Ecumenical Campus 



Ministries Inc. 

The purpose of the forum is 
twofold, Beaman said. 

"We'll be discussing the various 
points in opposition to the death 
penalty bill and how to go about put- 
ting forward opposition to the death 
penalty," she said. 

One of the featured speakers will 
be Robert Bryan, a San Francisco at- 
torney. Bryan is currently represen- 
ting Anna Hauptman, wife of Bruno 
Hauptman, who was executed for the 
alleged kidnap and murder of the 
Charles Lindberg baby, in an at- 
tempt to clear her husband's name. 
In addition, Beaman said Bryan 
represents more than 100 men cur- 



Subsidy 



Continued from Page li 

reduce production." 

However, reducing deficiency 
payments would destroy efforts 
made to increase U.S. com- 
petitiveness because less money in 
deficiency payments would force 
farmers to plant the land that has re- 
mained idle, Holaday said. 

"If we wouldn't produce one kernel 
of wheal t from now on ) , we'd have 86 
percent of all the wheat we'll need 
next year i beginning June 1 >," Hola- 
day said. 

In addition to a surplus at home, 
foreign producers are inheriting the 
market the United States once 
monopolized 

"We've been hammered on the 
world market by (wheat producers 
in> Australia, Canada and the South 



American countries," Hibbard said. 
"And the Soviet Union and China 
have been able to get their produc- 
tion up." 

Hibbard said one of the strengths 
of the 1985 farm bill is it allows an op- 
portunity for a market-oriented na- 
tion. Reducing deficiency payments 
would force production up and com- 
petiveness down. 

"We can't just pull the rug out 
from agriculture and say right now 
we're going to throw everything out 
into the market," Hibbard said. He 
said the administration is "ac- 
celerating faster than is necessary 
and fair." 

Holaday said the United States is 
close to obtaining that com- 
petitiveness. 

"We're not the cheapest price in 
wheat," he said, "(But) we're very 
close to being competitive on the 
world market We've come a long 
way " 



COLLEGE of EDUCATION 
Student Council Elections 

Feb. 10-11 
in Bluemont lobby 

Applications may be picked 

up in Bluemont 013 and 

are due Feb. 2. 





ENJOY THE SUPERBOWL 

EVEN MORE 

WITH THIS SUPER DEAL , 



10°/o OFF 

ON THE PURCHASE OF A 
6 FOOT or 3 FOOT PARTY SUB 

(present coupon when ordering) 



mm 



Sandwich Shop 

12th & Moro— Aggieville 
539-9308 



J 



GOOD LUCK CATS 

FRIDAY 
TGIF at 5 p.m. 

Hors d'oeuvres 




JS^S 




NO TICKETS FOR THE 
K-STATE/OU GAME? 

Watch The Game With Us 

On The Big Screen 

OPEN 2 p.m. 

GO GIANTS! 



DON'T MISS 

COMEDY INVASION 

This Monday At 9 p.m. 

Dan Starts 

along with Susan Sparks 




rently on death row throughout the 
United States. 

Primary reasons for the groups' 
opposition to the death penalty in- 
clude moral justification and the 
belief that the adoption of the death 
penalty will be financially burden- 
some for the state 

The forum comes at the time when 
a death penalty bill is currently 
working its way through the Kansas 
Legislature, If passed, it faces 
almost certain approval from Gov. 
Mike Hayden, a capital punishment 
supporter. Hayden vowed in his cam- 
paign that capital punishment would 
be reinstated during his term in of- 
fice. 



Beaman said public expression of 
the groups' opposition to the death 
penalty is essential. 

K*State's Speech Unlimited com- 
petitive speakers will conduct a 
debate on the death penalty in 
February, She said "it seems 
strange" that in a state that is seem- 
ingly so much in favor of the death 
penalty, the group has had a difficult 
time finding anyone to speak in sup- 
port of the death penalty at the 
February debate. 

She said it took nearly three mon- 
ths of searching before debate 
organizers found a death penalty 
supporter willing to debate. 



Operation fails to save 
joined-at-heart twins 



By The A ssociated Press 

PHILADELPHIA - Twin 
3'2-week-oId boys died Thursday 
after surgeons operated for eight 
hours to separate the infants, who 
shared a heart, liver and intestines, a 
hospital spokeswoman said. 

The second twin died at 6:30 p.m., 
6'v hours after the first infant died 
during the operation doctors had said 
would give only one of the twins a 
chance to live. 

The second baby's death was caus- 
ed by "multiple problems relating to 
surgery, primarily cardiac pro- 
blems," said Children's Hospital 
spokeswoman Patricia Unser. 

Dr. James O'Neill, chief of surgery 



at the hospital, had said after the 
operation that everything "went as 
well as could be expected, and it is 
very questionable" whether the se- 
cond infant would survive. 

Surgery to separate the twins, join- 
ed from breastbone to abdomen and 
together weighing 7 1 ? pounds, began 
at 8:20 a.m., nearly two hours after 
they were wheeled into the operating 
room, ft was completed at 4 p.m. 

Unser said "Baby A", separated 
from his brother at 2:30 p.m., was 
clinically dead at noon, less than four 
hours after the operation began. He 
was kept attached to his brother 
while surgeons moved the heart and 
liver into the proper places in "Baby 
B's" body. 



li 



MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERS 

Robert Nieman, Boeing representative 
will speak on flight instrumentation 

Monday, Jan. 26 

Durland 152 

7 p.m. 

Everyone welcome and refreshments provided! 



Kyrey srey raygrefrppregS'saaaaa^^ 






WATCH THE SUPERBOWL AT 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN 

BONKERS 

SUNDAY 

$2 PITCHERS 
FREE SANDWICH BAR 

Come See The Broncos Wins 

1216 Laramie 
■tf 537-9591 




SUN., JAN. 25 THROUGH SAT., JAN. 31 

GRAND OPENING 

RAY'S HAIR MAXIM 

(formerly Ray's Roffler Family Hair Center) 

•REG. M0 PERMS— $25 

(incl. cut) 

•REG. $1150 STYLE CUT-*** 
•REG. $20 HIGHLIGHTING— $10 

FREE BALLOONS AND A FREE GIFT 
FOR THE FIRST 100 CUSTOMERS 



622 N. MANHATTAN 
AGGIEVILLE 



537-8620 



Local group to view 
photography display 



By The CoIUegian Staff 

"Born Free and Equal: 
Photographs by Ansel Adams" 
now on display at the Nelson- 
Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas 
City, Mo., will highlight a trip by 
KSU Friends of Art and the 
Department of Art Jan. 31. 

Diane Dollar, instructor of art, 
said Ansel Adams is best known 
for his Western landscapes, but 
this display consists of some little- 
known early photographs. 

Taken in 1943, the prints are 
Adams' personal record of the 
Manzanar War Relocation Center 
in California, where about 10,000 
Japanese-Americans were intern- 
ed at the beginning of World War 
II. 

Manzanar consisted of bar- 



racks, administration buildings 
and mess halls, said Lauren 
English of the Nelson-Atkins 
Museum of Art, It was erected by 
an executive order in 1942 for per- 
sons of Japanese ancestry 
suspected of sabotage and es- 
pionage during the post-Pearl 
Harbor years when anti-Japanese 
sentiment was strong. 

Adams worked for one year to 
record the land and people of 
Manzanar. He refused any sup 
port for his photographic project 
fearing its labeling as propagan- 
da. There are 50 photographs 
from this time, English said. The 
display will continue through Feb 
15. 

The public is welcome to join 
the group which will leave by bus 
at 7 a.m. from the Union 




Special 
Dog Days 
Game Sale 



Jan. 29, 30, 31 
Look for our ad in Wednesday 's Collegian 

J& The Book Shop 

^* Village Plaza 

Mon.-Sat. 9-9, Sun. 9-8 



Thanks to the 1986 

Sig Ep Fife Nite 

Miss Knockout Candidates 

Shelly Shields wti 

Angie Boeve \l\ I 

Stacy Collins AI'A 

Cindy Bronson a=a 

Teri Ginter \ii 

Tisha Pope aaa 

Stephanie Boring r<t>B 

Julie Horigan K ab 

Lisa Sleezer ka 

Stephanie Brownell KKr 

Tammy Cook HB4> 

Jane Hanson X2X 

Congratulations to Teri Ginter of Chi Omega, 

the 1986 Miss Knockout. 
Looking forward to another group 

of GREAT CANDIDATES! 

FITE NITE '87 

April 5, 6, 7 



VMENTMWS BULLETIN 

WE DELIVER 

STARTING AT 11 a.m. 

Family Buffet 5-9 p.m. Mon.-Thurs. 
Luncheon Buffet 11 a.m. -2 p.m. Every Day 




V 



Super Bowl 
Pizza Delivery 

ALL DAY SUNDAY 

Call Early for Your Party Pizzas! 

Open 7 Days/Week 

11 a.m. till 10 p.m. 

Sunday through Thursday 

11a.m. till Midnight 

Friday and Saturday 

3019 Anderson 537-4350 

Village Plaza Shopping Center 

1016 W. 6th 238-6101 

Junction City 






J 



mmmaM 










^^^fm^m^mmmm 



nm iiiipiij ■»■■ 



. 




Weather 



First Address 

Gov. Mike Hayden delivers 
his first State of the State 
address Friday at the state 
capitol in Topeka. See Page 
3. 




Partly Sunny 

Partly sunny and 
warmer Monday, 
high in mid- to upper 
30s. Wind west to 
southwest 5 to 15 
mph. 



- , r '- 









- 




m valiant Effort 



The Wildcats scratch back 
from a 10-point, second half 
deficit to come within three 
points of the Oklahoma 
Sooners, falling short 81-78. 
See Page 8. 






Kansas 
State 



Kansas State University 




Monday 

January 26, 1987 



Manhattan. Kansas 66506 



Vohtrne 93. Number H4 



Senate to decide on proposed $6 athletic fee 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 

The Athletic Fee Task Force has 
finally come up with a bill. 

With slightly more than two weeks 
left until Student Senate elections 
and a possible student referendum 
on the proposed athletic fee, a 
$6-a -semester "non-revenue sports 
scholarship fee," as it may now be 
called, will be proposed at the Senate 
Operations Committee meeting at 8 
tonight in the Student Governing Ser- 
vices office in the Union, 

Task force members attended a 
special meeting Friday to finalize 
plans for the bill. 

The fee would make K-State the 
fifth university in the Big Eight Con- 
ference to assess an athletic fee to 
students. The other four univerf i,i- * 
are : the University of Kansas, $ 
semester; Iowa State Unive 
$10.50 a semester; the Univers 
Colorado, $16.50 a semester ;___ 
Oklahoma State University, at> 
a semester. 

Doug Folk, task force chai 
and junior in electrical engine 
said he talked to Athletic Dii 
Larry Travis last week. 

Reagan mus 
take action, 
officials say 

By The Associated Preat 

WASHINGTON - Thechaim 
the Senate Foreign Relations ' 
mittee said Sunday that Prat 
Reagan should consider mil i tar 
tion in the latest kidnapping of l< 
Americans in Beirut if the host 
takers carry out a threat to kil 
U.S. citizens. 

Sen. Claiborne Pell, D-R.L, 
Reagan should take "pretty h; 
action against Iran if there is "c 
evidence" that Iran is behind 
latest kidnapping, which occui 
Saturday. However, Pell added, 
it's a group without any governn 
connection, then... there really L 
good solution." 

Both Pell and Treasury Secrel 
James Baker also said they tl 
any Americans remaining in Be 
should leave. 



'We're going to continue 
see Americans seized as lc 
as the world knows that 
will swap arms 
hostages../ 

— Sen. Patrick Lea 



Pell, appearing on ABC-TV's "1 
Week with David Bnnkley," i 
"there's not much" Reagan can di 
win the release of the three nl 
hostages. 

"I don't envy the president, 
situation he's in now," Pell sa 
"And if he can really establish a I: 
between these terrorists and Syria 
Iran or any other government 
think he would be justified in go. 
after that government pretty hart 

Baker, a member of the Natiot 
Security Council, said on NBC-F 
"Meet the Press," that there was 
clear reason for the kidnapping. 

"We're not sure who took then 
he said. 

Actually, the Christian-controfl 
Voice of Lebanon radio station 
Beirut reported early Sunday that 
group of pro-Iranian Shiite Moslp 
extremists, calling themselves H 
Organization of the Oppressed « 
Earth, claimed responsibility for U 
kidnappings 

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt , in 
telephone interview Sunday, agr* 
with Pell that "we've got a terrifc 
anti-terrorist policy. U'b in 
shambles." 

"We're going to continue to i 
Americans seized as long as tt 
world knows that we will swap arn 
for hostages, and that's exactly whf 
we did with Iran," said Leahy, wfc 
was vice-chairman of the Senate l» 
telligence Committee last modi 
when it investigated the Iran arm; 
Contra controversy. 



Travis said the Department of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics could put 
monies generated from an athletic 
fee into a restricted account. Folk 
told task force members. The money 
could then be channelled directly 
from the students into the restricted 
account, then to the Office of Student 
Financial Assistance. 

"They could even set it up to where 
they (the athletic department) never 
saw the money," Folk said. 

The athletic department would 
also agree to ensure all of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic 
Association-allowed scholarships for 
non-revenue sports were filled, Folk 
said. 

"I was pretty happy that (Travis) 
would agree to those restrictions," 
be said. "I like tha iHas Th»v'r» 



decided to let revenue from the fee 
fund 40 percent of all non-revenue 
sports scholarships. The athletic 
department would "fill the gap" 
each year, funding the remainder of 
the scholarships, Folk said. 

Currently, the maximum number 
of full scholarships allowed non- 
revenue sports by the NCAA is 89. 



The equivalent number of full 
scholarships awarded at K-State is 
68.63, according to information sup- 
plied by Mike Jones, athletic depart- 
ment business manager. 

The current cost associated with 
an out-of-state scholarship is $5,440 a 
year. An in-state scholarship is $3,525 
a year, Jones said. 



Fully funding all 89 scholarships 
based on out-of-state tuition would 
cost the athletic department (484,000 
annually. Based on in-state tuition, 
the cost would be $314,000 annually. 

Folk said the task force would base 
the athletic fee on out-of-state 
scholarship costs. 

"Obviously, if they can afford to 





Non-Revenue Sports Scholarships 




Non-Revenue Sport 


No. of 

Full Scholarships 

Allowed by NCAA 


Equivalent No. of 

Scholarships Awarded 

by K-State 


No. of Students 

Receiving Scholarships 

at K-State' 


Men's Baseball 


li 


10.9! 


20 



get the out-of-state athletes, they will 
do that," he said. 

A $6-a -semester athletic fee, based 
on an average of 16,000 students, 
would raise $192,000 a year, about 40 
percent of the required $484,000. 

Summer school students should not 
have to pay the fee because they will 
not benefit from free athletic events, 
members decided 

The issue of how much to charge 
part-time students was not resolved. 
Steven Johnson, student body presi- 
dent and junior in agricultural 
economics, said fee charges general- 
ly are one-half for part-time 
students, but added the decision was 
up to task force members. 

The final sentences of the bill to be 
read to Senate Ooerations Commit- 







^— f-^^^ 



■"^■■■VmiVW 



. 




First Address 

Gov. Mike Hayden delivers 
his first State of the State 
address Friday at the state 
capitol in Topeka. See Page 

3. 



Weather 







Partly Sunny 

Partly sunny and 
warmer Monday, 
high in mid- to upper 
30s. Wind west to 
southwest 5 to 15 
mph. 



■ - 



. 







valiant Effort 

The Wildcats scratch back 
from a W-point, second half 
deficit to come within three 
points of the Oklahoma 
Sooner s f falling short 81-78. 
See Page 8. 



Kansas 
State 



Kansas State University 




Monday 

January 26, 1987 



Manhattan. Kansas €6506 



Volume 93, Number M 



Senate to decide on proposed $6 athletic fee 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 

The Athletic Fee Task Force has 
finally come up with a bill. 

With slightly more than two weeks 
left until Student Senate elections 
and a possible student referendum 
on the proposed athletic fee, a 
$6-a-semester "non-revenue sports 
scholarship fee." as it may now be 
called, will be proposed at the Senate 
Operations Committee meeting at 8 
tonight in the Student Governing Ser- 
vices office in the Union 

Task force members attended a 
special meeting Friday to finalize 
plans for the bill. 

The fee would make K-State the 
fifth university in the Big Eight Con- 
ference to assess an athletic fee to 
students. The other four univerF J * s — 
are: the University of Kansas, $ 
semester; Iowa State Unive 
$10.50 a semester; the Univere 
Colorado, $16.50 a semester;..^. 
Oklahoma State University, at> 
a semester. 

Doug Folk, task force thai 
and junior in electrical engine 
said he talked to Athletic Dii 
Larry Travis last week. 

Reagan mus 
take action, 
officials say 



By The A ssociated Preat 

WASHINGTON - Thechairn 
the Senate Foreign Relation* ' 
mittee said Sunday that Pre* 
Reagan should consider mil i tar 
tion in the latest kidnapping of 1> 
Americans in Beirut if the host 
takers carry out a threat to kil 
U.S. citizens. 

Sen. Claiborne Pell, DR. I., 
Reagan should take "pretty hi 
action against Iran if there is "C 
evidence" that Iran is behind 
latest kidnapping, which occui 
Saturday. However, Pell added, 
it's a group without any governn 
connection, then... there really it 
good solution." , 

Both Pell and Treasury Secret 
James Baker also said they tl 
any Americans remaining in Be 
should leave 



'We're going to continue 
see Americans seized as lc 
as the world knows that 
will swap arms 1 
hostages.,.' 

— Sen. Patrick Lea 



Pell, appearing on ABC-TV's "1 
Week with David Brinkley," 
"there's not much" Reagan can A 
win the release of the three n 
hostages. 

"I don't envy the president, 
situation he's in now," Pell I 
"And if he can really establish a 1; 
between these terrorists and Syria 
Iran or any other government 
think he would be justified in go- 
after that government pretty hart 

Baker, a member of the Natioi 
Security Council, said on NBC-T 
"Meet the Press," that there was 
clear reason for the kidnapping. 

"We're not sure who took then- 
he said. 

Actually, the Christian-control 
Voice of Lebanon radio station 
Beirut reported early Sunday that 
group of pro- Iranian Shiite Mosln 
extremists, calling themselves tl 
Organization of the Oppressed d 
Earth, claimed responsibility for tl 
kidnappings. 

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. in 
telephone interview Sunday, agrm 
with Pell that "we've got a terrib 
anti-terrorist policy. It's in 
shambles." 

"We're going to continue to tt 
Americans seized as long as tl 
world knows that we will swap am 
for hostages, and that's exactly w&* 
we did with Iran," said Leahy, wt 
was vice-chairman of the Senate Ii 
telligence Committee last moat 
when it investigated the Iran arm 
Contra controversy. 



- 



Travis said the Department of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics could put 
monies generated from an athletic 
fee into a restricted account, Folk 
told task force members. The money 
could then be channelled directly 
from the students into the restricted 
account, then to the Office of Student 
Financial Assistance. 

"They could even set it up to where 
they (the athletic department) never 
saw the money," Folk said. 

The athletic department would 
also agree to ensure all of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic 
Association-allowed scholarships for 
non-revenue sports were filled, Folk 
said. 

"I wa<; nroltv hannv that rTra«i«i 



decided to let revenue from the fee 
fund 40 percent of all non-revenue 
sports scholarships. The athletic 
department would "fill the gap" 
each year, funding the remainder of 
the scholarships, Folk said. 

Currently, the maximum number 
of full scholarships allowed non- 
revenue sports by the NCAA is 89. 



The equivalent number of full 
scholarships awarded at K-State is 
68.63, according to information sup- 
plied by Mike Jones, athletic depart- 
ment business manager. 

The current cost associated with 
an out-of-state scholarship is $5,440 a 
year. An in-state scholarship is $3,525 
a year, Jones said. 



Fully funding all 89 scholarships 
based on out-of-state tuition would 
cost the athletic department $484,000 
annually. Based on in-state tuition, 
the cost would be $314,000 annually. 

Folk said the task force would base 
the athletic fee on out-of-state 
scholarship costs. 

"Obviously, if they can afford to 



Non-Revenue Sports Scholarships 



Nan- Revenue Sport 



No. of 

Full Scholarships 

Allowed by NCAA 



Equivalent No. of 

Scholarships Awarded 

by K-State 



No. of Students 

Receiving Scholarships 

alKrStatt* 



get the out-of-state athletes, they will 
do that," he said. 

A $6-a-semester athletic fee, based 
on an average of 16,000 students, 
would raise $192,000 a year, about 40 
percent of the required $484,000. 

Summer school students should not 
have to pay the fee because they will 
not benefit from free athletic events, 
members decided. 

The issue of how much to charge 
part-time students was not resolved. 
Steven Johnson, student body presi- 
dent and junior in agricultural 
economics, said fee charges general- 
ly are one-half for part-time 
students, but added the decision was 



Friday. Jwiuwy 23. 1 gf 



Television Index 




ManhttUn Cable 


KSNT (NBC) 




7 


WIBW (CBS) 




3 


KLDH <ABC) 




2 


KSHB (IND) 




8 


KTWU (PBS) 




11 


WGN (IND) 




10 


WTBS(IND) 




12 


Premium cable: 






HBO, Showtime, 






CINEMAX. ESPN 






Additional cable 


channels 


not listed in guide: Manhattan 


cable channels 4 


NBC), 


5 


(CBS) and 9 (ABC) corres 


pond to channels 7, 


3 and 2, 


respectively. 







FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1987 



"KSrTF WIBW KTKA KSHB KTWU WGN 



WTBS HBO SHOW MAX ESPN 



7:00 Today 
:30 " 



8:00 
:30 



CBS AM New Good Morning MyUrtlePony Spatial 
Morning America Tom And Jerry Mister Rogers 

Program " Winders Seaaroe Street 



Bom 



Jeannie 
Bewitched 



Movie: 



"National 



Cont'd 



Business 
Sport sCenler 



Brady Bunch 



Heathelitt 



qOO Hour Magazine 



'.30 



Pyramid 
Card Sharks 



Ask Or Ruth 
$1 Mil. Chance 



■* /v00 Jeopardy 
IU:30 ScraOble 



Price Is flight 



Fame Fortune 
Webster 



Mork & Mirvdy 
Day At A Time 

Mary Tyler 
Moore 



Sesame Street Falcon Crest 



Down To Earth 
Hove Lucy 

Movie: 
"Seven 



EuioWdr. 

Vacation" 



"Operation 



Bowling 
HiQfifloBerS 



Movie: 
'Breakl- 



Pacifte" 



Trap Shoot 
Auto Racing 



Body Eteciric 
Hatha Yoga 



Hint-Mies 
Odd Couple 



Mot News 



hrough" 
Van Raton 



Movie: 
"Sylvester" 



SpeedWeek 
SportsLook 



■4 -f :00 Password 



:30 Wheel Fortune 



CM The Slate 
Yrtg > Rest. 



Ryan's Hope 
Loving 



Soap 



Ecology 



Hi Heroes 

TwWQhtZone 



Perry Mason Movie 



AM 



Home From Mowe, 



Aerobics 
Getting Fit 



12 :« 



:30 Days Of Our 



Midday 

Aa The World 



All My 
Children 



1 



:00 Lives 

:30 Another World 



Toms 
Capitol 



One Ufa To 

Live 



Dick Van Dyke 
HlHbHHea 

For Daddy 
My 3 Sons 



Sesame Street News 



Movie: 
Ghost Of 



TrteHIH' 



'Reds' 



Movie 

"The Slugger's 



College 
Basketball 



Mystery! 



Dick Van Dyke 
Andy Griffith 



Zorro" 
WomanWatch 



Wife" 



Movie 



UNCatW 
Forest 



2:00 
:30 Santa Barbara 



Guiding Light 



General 

Hospital 



Munslers 
ZoobOea Zoo 



Kitchen 
Painting 



3:00 



:30 Happy Days 



Mignum, P.I 



Ghost busters 
Dennis 



ScoobyDoo 
Smurts 



We're Cooking 
Aerobics 



Beaver 
Bugs Bunny 

Ghostbusiers 
Smurts 



TomsJerry 

And friends 



"Harvey 
Middleman. 



NFL Films 
NFL Films 



ScoobyDoo 

Flintstones 



Moid 

"BMX 



Around The 
World in 80 



Fireman' 
Movie: 



PGA Gorl 
Phoenix 



K'ntertainmcnt 



4:00 Diff Strokes 
:30 Facts Of Life 



Donahue 



ThunderCats 
G.I.Joe 



Fl in I st ones 
Jetsons 



Mister Rogers 
3-2-1 Contact 



G.I.Joe 



Giilkjan 
Safe At Home 



Bandits' 
Movie: 



Days 
Gel Along 



Blood AHey' 



Open Second 
Round 



30 NBC News 



CBS News 



People's Court 
ABC News 



Facia 01 life 
Gimme Break 



Sesame Street 



Facts 01 Lite 
WKRP 



Hillbillies 
Andy Griffith 



"Tender 
Mercies" 



Movie 

"A Piano For 



"Where Do We 



SportsLook 
SpeedWeek 



6 00 



EDITOR 

Jonie Trued 
ARTS EDITOR 

Sarah Kessinger 
PHOTO/GRAPHICS EDITOR 

Andy Nelson 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

1 Sheila Hutinett 



30 Wheel Fortune rtowtyweds 

00 Stingray Scarecrow 

:3Q And Mrs King 



Benson 
M'A'S'H 



WKRP 
Barney Miller 



MacNeU/ 
Lefirer 



Barney Miller 



Webster 

Mr 



Movie: 
Yankee 



Wash Week Movie: 
WalStWk. "Helter 



8:00 Miami Vice 
:30 



GungHo 
Dads 



Dandy" 



Economics 
McLaughlin 



Skeher" 



Sanlord 
Honeymooners 

NBA 
Basketball 

Kmcksat 
Rockets 



Inside The 
NFL 



Mrs Cimino" 



Go From 

Here'" 



SoortsCenter 
NFL Films 



Movie: 
"Murphy's 



Brothers 
Shandling 



Movie: 
"The 



S Bowl 
NFL Films 



Romance 



"National 
Lampoon's 



Coca-Cola 

Kid" 



Tennis 
Australian 



9:00 Pointer Sisters 
:30 



Falcon Crest Slarman 



TBA 



Facet Japan 

Market 



MO'OTWQflK 



"The Glitter 



European 
Vacation" 



"After Hours" 



Open 



10* 



:30 Tonight Show Dating Game M'A'S'H 



Late Show 



Nature Profiles Honeyroooners 
sfl pt Magnum, PL 



Night Tracks ■ 
Power Ptoy 



Dome' 



Van Helen 



Magic Yrs. 
SportsCenter 



1 :30 MTV Video 



Lifesiytos 



Ask Dr. Ruth 
Wghmne 



MacNeri/ 



Movie: 



Movie: 



Night Tracks 



1st I Ten 
lit a Ten 



Movie: 
"Breakfast 



Movie: 
"Melody m 



NFL Fume 
Outdoors 



a o:00 Countdown 
1*1:30 Gene Scott 



CHIPS 



700 Oub 



Johnny 
HoHday'' 



"TheBrktosOf 
FuManchu" 



Night Tracks Not News 



Club" 
For Laughs 



Love" 
Movie 



World Cup 
Skiing 




SATURDAY, January 24, 1987 



KSNT WIBW 



K 7 K 7 kshB KTWU WGN~ WTBS HBO SHOW MAX 



ESPN 



On Our Cover 

What's it take to make 
people laugh? Local 
amateur comedians Mike 
Musick and Andre Kelley 
tell why they love to get on 
their feet and find out while 
putting up with the hecklers 
and headaches of the stand- 
up comedy business. See 
Page 4. 

Cover Photo 
by Steve Rasmussen 



You can enjoy 
four meals for 
only $6. So 
come to your 
nearest 

Kentucky Fried 
Chicken store 
and save on 
America's 
favorite fried 
chicken. 



FEED 



• 2 piecw o' cntUn 
(Origin* Fwjcipe* 
oi Enn Crispy'M) 

• t v 

ind gr«y 



tor only II 50 MA trm coupon 
Uma ma uduoa pw coupon lour 
couponi par custom* Good on 
torntwunon wfMaMerk orders or** 
Cusmmtr pays H *PP»ca 
COUPON EKWWS Man* ii, 1«7 
Umt * f*rwrts pw coupon 




«IM» 



mm 







First Address 

Gov. Mike Hay den delivers 
his first State of the State 
address Friday at the state 
capitol in Topeka. See Page 
3. 



Weather 



H2 



■ 
■ 







Partly Sunny 

Partly sunny and 
warmer Monday, 
high in mid- to upper 
30s. Wind west to 
southwest 5 to 15 
mph. 





f 


t 2y; 


Wi | 


RSL 





valiant Effort 

The Wildcats scratch back 
from a 10-point, second half 
deficit to come within three 
points of the Oklahoma 
Sooner s, falling short 81-78. 
See Page 8. 



Kansas 
State 




Monday 

January 26. J 987 



Kansas State University 



Manhattan. Kansas 66306 



Volume 93, Number H4 



Senate to decide on proposed $6 athletic fee 



■' - 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 

The Athletic Fee Task Force has 
finally come up with a bill. 

With slightly more than two weeks 
left until Student Senate elections 
and a possible student referendum 
on the proposed athletic fee, a 
$6-a-semester "non-revenue sports 
scholarship fee," as it may now be 
called, will be proposed at the Senate 
Operations Committee meeting at 8 
tonight in the Student Governing Ser- 
vices office in the Union. 

Task force members attended a 
special meeting Friday to finalize 
plans for the bill. 

The fee would make K-State the 
fifth university in the Big Eight Con- 
ference to assess an athletic fee to 
students. The other four univers itlM 
are: the University of Kansas, $ 
semester; Iowa State Umve 
$10.50 a semester; the Univere 
Colorado, $16.50 a «""'"''*• 
Oklahoma State University, abt 
a semester. 

Doug Folk, task force chai 
and junior in electrical engine 
said he talked to Athletic Oil 
Larry Travis last week. 

Reagan mus 
take action] 
officials say 



By Th e Associated Fresf 

WASHINGTON - The chaim 
the Senate Foreign Relations < 
mittee said Sunday that Pits 
Reagan should consider mill tar 
tion in the latest kidnapping of I' 
Americans in Beirut if the host 
takers carry out a threat to kil' 
U.S. citizens 

Sen. Claiborne Pell, D-R.L, 
Reagan should take "pretty hi 
action against Iran if there is "C 
evidence" that Iran is behind 
latest kidnapping, which occtu 
Saturday. However, Pell added, 
it's a group without any govemn 
connection, then.,. there really ii 
good solution." 

Both Pell and Treasury Secret 
James Baker also said they tl 
any Americans remaining in Be 
should leave. 



'We're going to continue 
see Americans seized as lc 
as the world knows that 
will swap arms 
hostages...' 

— Sen. Patrick Lea 



Pell, appearing on ABC-TVs "1 
Week with David Brinkley," ll 
"there's not much" Reagan can d*l 
win the release of the three n 
hostages. 

"I don't envy the president, 
situation he's in now," Pell t 
"And if he can really establish a It 
between these terrorists and Syria 
Iran or any other government 
think he would be justified in go. 
after that government pretty hart 

Baker, a member of the Natiw 
Security Council, said on NBC-T" 
"Meet the Press," that there was 
clear reason for the kidnapping. 

"We're not sure who took then 
he said. 

Actually, the Christian-controH 
Voice of Lebanon radio station 
Beirut reported early Sunday that 
group of pro- Iranian Shiite Mosle 
extremists, calling themselves t 
Organization of the Oppressed 
Earth, claimed responsibility for tl 
kidnappings. 

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., ift 
telephone interview Sunday, agrei 
with Pell that "we've got a terrib 
anti-terrorist policy. It's in 
shambles." 

"We're going to continue to ■ 
Americans seized as long as tt 
world knows that we will swap am 
for hostages, and that's exactly win 
we did with Iran," said Leahy, wto 
was vice-chairman of the Senate Ii 
telligence Committee last moot 
when it investigated the Iran arm 
Contra controversy. 



Travis said the Department of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics could put 
monies generated from an athletic 
fee into a restricted account. Folk 
told task force members. The money 
could then be channelled directly 
from the students into the restricted 
account, then to the Office of Student 
Financial Assistance. 

"They could even set it up to where 
they (the athletic department) never 
saw the money," Folk said. 

The athletic department would 
also agree to ensure all of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic 
Association-allowed scholarships for 
non-revenue sports were filled, Folk 
said. 

"I was pretty happy that (Travis) 
would agree to those restrictions," 
he said. "I like the idea. They're 



decided to let revenue from the fee 
fund 40 percent of all non-revenue 
sports scholarships. The athletic 
department would "fill the gap" 
each year, funding the remainder of 
the scholarships, Folk said. 

Currently, the maximum number 
of full scholarships allowed non- 
revenue sports by the NCAA is 89. 



The equivalent number of full 
scholarships awarded at K-State is 
68.63, according to information sup- 
plied by Mike Jones, athletic depart- 
ment business manager. 

The current cost associated with 
an out-of-state scholarship is $5,440 a 
year. An in-state scholarship is $3,525 
a year, Jones said. 



Fully funding all 89 scholarships 
based on out-of-state tuition would 
cost the athletic department $484,000 
annually. Based on in-state tuition, 
the cost would be $314,000 annually. 

Folk said the task force would base 
the athletic fee on out-of-state 
scholarship costs. 

"Obviously, if they can afford to 



Non-Revenue Sports Scholarships 



Non-Revenue Sport 


No. of 

Full Scholarships 

Allowed by NCAA 


Equivalent No. of 

Scholarships Awarded 

by K-State 


No. of Students 

Receiving Scholarships 

at K-State' 


Men's Baseball 


13 


10.91 


20 
13 



.'. «•-.' .• •■•.« 



SUNDAY, JANUARY 25, 1987 



KSNT 



WIBW KTKA 



KSHB 
CD 



KTWU WGN 



WTBS HBO 



SHOW MAX 



ESPN 



y:W 



30 J.Kennedy 



Jerry Fajwefl 



Jimmy 



Superlriertds 
Suportr lends 



Culture 
Mattel 



fl Schutter 
Horttaae 



Tom 1 Jerry 
And Friends 



Movie Cont'd 
The Talk Show 



Movie: 
"Ape And 



Movie; 
"The G real 



NFL Rims 
NFL Films 



8:00 Llundstrom 
:30 



Discovery 
Truth 



Copawjnd 



Sesame St reel 



9:00 Schultef 
:30 Jimmy 



Sunday 



10- 



It Is Written 
PtvkJ PrtrHOey 



wild, vviw 



Mister Rogers 
Special 



SundayMass 
Porky Pip 

Bugs Bunny 



Cont'd 
Andy Griffith 



FraggieRock 
Movie: 



Super-Ape' 
Movie 



Muppet 

Caper 



NFL Films 
NFL Films 



Good Newt 
Movie: 



"Gremlins" "Lady Jane" 



Movie: 
'American 



NFL Rims 
SporttGonler 



:30 Meet Press 



College 



Abb. & Cost 



Maverick 



Sesame Street 



Cisco Kid 
Lone Ranger 



"Ho* The 
WeslWas 



Movie 



Fryers" 



Sunday 
SportsCenter 



-4 -j :00 World Tom 



:30 Larry Brown 



Basketball 

DePaul at 



Wrestling 



Star Trek 



Perkins Family 
OWL I TV 



Rawhide 



Won" 



"Critters" 



Paper Chase 



Movie: 
"Sweet 



Sunday 
NFL Films 



a rvOO College 
I £:30 Basketball 



Georgetown 
NBA 



Dukes 01 
Hanaro* 



Movie 
"Taraan 



Wash Week 
Wall Si. Wk. 



Movie 
"Mr. Moto's 



"Troll" 



"Briel 



NFL Films 
NFL Rims 



■4:00 NCSIateat 
1:30 Kan 



Basketball 



College 
Basketball 



Triumphs" 



Money World 
Computer 



Last Warning" 
Movie: 



Movie 
"Paint Your 



Encounter" 



Humor 1 The Movie: 



NFL Rims 
NFL Films 



2:00 SportsWorld 
:;" 



:30 Figure Skating 



Celtics 



Navy at 
Kentucky 



Movie 

"I'm No 



Kansas 
Literature 



"Don'l Bottler 
To Knock" 



Wagon" 



Presidency 



"Dune" 



S.Bowl 
SportsCenter 



3:00 Champs. 
:30 Movie 



Super Bowl 
Today 



"The Dove" 



Angel" 



Firing Line 



"The 

Longsno!" 



Advert 



lure" 



PGA Golf 
Phoenix 



:30 Zorro" 



Movie: 



On 



Communidad 
Espanol 



"Trie Charge 
01 The Light 



WorldOt 



FraggieRock 



van Mslen 
Alive! 



Movie; 
"Can't Stop 



Open Final 
Round 



5:00 
30 NBC News 



XX 



r'l 



Fame 



Their Toet" 



Homage 



Brigade" 
Putlin' On 



Audubon 



Movie: 



Movie: 
"Beyond The 



The Music" 



World Cup 

Skiing 



6:00 Our House 
:30 



Denver 
Broncos vs. 



Movie: 
"The 



Solid Gold 



Wild America 
Naiure Profiles 



Fame 



Adventure" 



Movie; 

Sylvester _ 



SpoCtr 
Ski World 



-t:00 Easy Street 



30 Valerie 



New York 
Giants 



Undergrads" 



NewGi 
If 



ewGidpet 
s A Living 



Nature 



lifestyles 



Comanche" 



Movie: 
"Gremlins" 



Movie: 
"Lady Jane 



AWA 
Championship 



8 



00 Movie: 

:30 "Return To 



Movie: 

"The Dead 



Ted Knight 
Check It Oui! 



Masterpiece 
Theatre 



Love Boat 



National 
Geographic 



"Sieeel 



Wrestling 



9:00 Mayberry" 
:. 



:30 



Hard Copy 



Zone" 



Tales 
Write Songs 



"Lost 
Empires 



Explorer 



Don Johnson's 
Heartbeat 



Dreams 



RoHermania 



10:30 Throb 



Mama's Family Delights 
Movie: TV Classics 



Tales 
Lou Grant 



Sports Page 
Jerry Fahvwt 



Movie: 



Or 



"Thief 0C 
Hearts' 



Movie' 
"Dance With A 



Sport sCenler 
Sunday 



1a 00 Lon Kruger 
1:30 Community 



Big Family 
Today's 



Mann.. 



"Yankee 
Doodle 



Japan 
Tony Brown 



Charles 



J Ankerberg Movie: 



13" 



Movie: 



Stranger' 



NFL s Greatest 
Moments 



1 ti:30 



Business 



Fame 



Dandy" 



At The Movie* 
Fame 



MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 1987 



Swagoari 



"Gimme An 
F" 



MOVW 



Karate 



KSNT 



WIBW 



KTKA KSHB KTWU WON WTBS HBO 



SHOW MAX 



ESPN 



y;00 Toot)- 



CSS AM News Good Morning My Little Pony Special Bozo 

Morning America Tom And Jerry Mister Rogers 



"Tilt To Me" 



Bind Sunday 
J. 'I Journey 



Movie Cont d 



Business 
Sport sCenler 



8:00 
:30 



Program 



Defenders 
Brady Bunch 



Sesame Street 



Down To Earth 

I Love Lucy Not Newt 



Room Hood 



"The Aviator" Tennis 



9:00 Hour Magazine Pyramid 
30 



Card Sharks 



Ask Dr. Ruth MorkSMindy 
$ i Mil Chance Day At A Time 



Sesame Street Falcon Crest Movie: 



A r\00 jeopardy 

I U:30 Scrabble 

1a 00 Password 

1:30 Wheel Fortune 



"Bright 



Movie: 
"A Chorus 



"The 



"Harvey 



Open 



Price Is Right 



Young And 
The Restless 



Fame Fortune 
Webste. 



Mary Tyler 
Moore 



Body Electric 
Hatha Yoga 



Hillbillies 
Odd Couple 



Victory" 



Line" 



Badtanders'' 
It's Showtime 



Middleman. 
Fireman" 



Golf 

SoortsLook 



Ryan's Hope 
Loving 



Bewitched 
Soap 



Literature 
Algebra 



H's Heroes 
Twilight Zone 



Centennial 



Movie: 
"Iron Eagle" 



Movie: 
"Young 



While Religion 
Movie 



Aerobics 
Getting Fit 



a O'QO News 



30 Days Of Our A* The World 



AH My 
Children 



Dick Van Dyke Sesame Street News 



Sherlock 
Hotnws 



"Blood Alley" Tennis 



1:00 Lives 
30 Another World 



Turns 
Capitol 



One Life To 
live 



For Daddy 

My 3 Sons 



Nature 



Dick Van Dyke 
Andy Griffith 



Movie: 
"Silver City" 



MOV«6i 

"Firstborn" 



MOVJfl! 



2:00 
30 Santa Barbara 



Guiding Light General 



Mutators Nature Profiles Beaver Tom a Jerry 

ZoobHooZoo McLaughan Bugs Bunny And Friends 



"The Gold 
Rush" 



Ga. Tech at 
UNC 



3" 



30 Happy Days 



Magnum, P.I. 



Ghost busters 

Dennis 



ScoobyDoo 

Smurfs 



We're Cooking Ghostbusters 
Aerobics Smurfs 



ScoobyDoo 
Flint stones 



Courage 
Toby And 



J. a Journey 
Blind Sunday 



Movie: 
"Bitter 



C8A 

Basketball 



4:00 DM. Strokes 
30 Facts Of Ufa 



ThundarCats 
G.i.Joe 



Square 1TV 
3-2- 1 Contact 



0.1. Joe 
Transformers 



GNgen 
nocay noao 



The Koala 



Pudd'nbead 



Harvest" 



La Crosse at 
Rocklord 



30 NBC News 



CBS 



Peoples Court Facts Of Ufa 

ADvHVWI 



Sesame Street 



Facts Of Life 
WKRP 



Movie: 

Down To Earth "You Light Up 



Movie: 

"The Ice 



SportsLook 
Outdoors 



6:00 
30 Wheel Fortune 



M'A'S'H 



WKRP 
Bflfrwy Mww 



MecNeil/ 
Lehrer 



HairTTii llaMaar 



Santord My Life" 

Honeymooners Fraggle flock 



Spon sCenler 
Collsoo 



-7:00 Movie 
/:30 



The Alamo: 



KateaAJke 

My Slater Sam Music Awards 



American Barnaby Jones Planet Earth 



National 
Geographic 



Movie: 

"Speedway 1 ' 



Movie: 
"Weird 



Movie: 
"Runaway 



Movie: 



Basketball 
Pittsburgh at 



8:00 13 Days To 
:30 flaxy 4 



Cavanaughs 



MOVW. 

"Same Time. 



Playhouse Geographic 



tdfit 'ka^eiM 



Train" 



Howie Mendel 



Syr, 
Gokoge 



9:00 
:30 



Cegneyl 

Lacey 



Next Year" 



OsaieaRuby 
3 Filmmakers 



"A Chorus 



Movie: 



Movie: 
"Turk 182!" 



Basketball 
Mich. St. at 



ja: 00 
11° 



30 TorMghtShow Dating Game M'A'S'H 



Late Show 



Nature ProNaa 
iRpt, 



Honeymooners Mountain" 
i,P.L 



Action 2: The 



SportsCenter 



30 Oavk) 



Nighil 



Ask Dr. Ruth News 



Hllcncock 



Geographic "Black Moon 



"Young 
Sherlock 



One On One 
"After Hours Ftehei Hole 



12:30 QeneScotl 



"Town Of 

Scandal" 



700 CM) 



Three Stooges 



Explorer 



Rising" 



Holmes" 



Movie 



Auto Racing 



get the out-of-state athletes, they will 
do that," he said. 

A $6-a -semester athletic fee, based 
on an average of 16,000 students, 
would raise $192,000 a year, about 40 
percent of the required $484,000. 

Summer school students should not 
have to pay the fee because they will 
not benefit from free athletic events, 
members decided. 

The issue of how much to charge 
part-time students was not resolved, 
Steven Johnson, student body presi- 
dent and junior in agricultural 
economics, said fee charges general- 
ly are one-half for part-time 
students, but added the decision was 
up to task force members. 

The final sentences of the bill to be 
read to Senate Operations Commit- 



FrMwy, January 23. 1M7 

Cost studies 
of museum 
to start soon 



By JENNIFER L1NDSEY 
Staff Writer 

The steering committee for the 
proposed University art museum 
met Jan. 7 to discuss the possibility 
of going ahead with the facility 
despite University-wide budget 
cuts. 

One decision made at the 
meeting was to hire the Communi- 
ty Service Bureau Inc. to conduct 
the feasibility study of the 
museum, said Ruth Ann Wefald, 
steering committee chairwoman. 

Wefald said this Dallas-based 
company was chosen over others 
because it is familiar with Kansas 
and the University. The Communi- 
ty Service Bureau Inc. did the 
feasibility study for the Fred 
Bramlage Coliseum. 

Possible site locations were also 
discussed at the meeting, but no 
particular site was decided upon, 
Wefald said. 

The committee, made up of in- 
terested students, faculty and com- 
munity members, will have to 
decide between using an existing 
building on campus or building a 
new one, said Sally Traeger, senior 
in marketing and committee 
member. 

"Our goal is to get the museum 
in an area of campus that would 
compliment its nature, somewhere 
near Nichols (Hall) or McCain 
(Auditorium)," Traeger said. 

Final decisions will not be made, 
however, until the feasibility study 
has been completed, Traeger said, 

"There hasn't been an excessive 
move made on it because we need 
to be sure it's something we can 
pursue," she said. 

The company will begin the 
study in February and the report is 
due to the committee on April 1, 
Wefald said. 

K-State's art collection consists 
of about 1,000 pieces, including 
works by Pablo Picasso, Salvador 
Dali and Henri Matisse. 

Since there is not one area large 
enough to display all of these 
pieces, the collection is dispersed 
throughout campus buildings and 
offices. 

Many pieces are displayed on the 
second floor of the Union and in 
President Jon Wefald's office in 
Anderson Hall. Traeger said. 



Planning a wedding? 

Look for the 

Wedding tabloid 

in the Collegian 

on Feb. 17. 





FREE MEDIUM SOFT DRINK 

with the purchase of any sub 

12th & Moro— Aggieville 
Expires 2-28-87 Void with any offers * 



* 1 '■ •" I 



^mmmmmmmm 







First Address 

Gov. Mike Hay den delivers 
his first State of the State 
address Friday at the state 
capitol in Topeka. See Page 
3. 



Weather 








Partly Sunny 


Partly sunny and 
warmer Monday, 
high in mid- to upper 
30s. Wind west to 
southwest 5 to J5 
mph. 



- 



. . 




valiant Effort 

The Wildcats scratch back 
from a 10-point, second half 
deficit to come within three 
points of the Oklahoma 
Sooners, falling short 81-78. 
See Page 8. 



Kansas 
State 



Kansas State University 




O 



DS1DD 



Monday 

January 26, 1987 



Manhattan, Kansas 66506 



Volume 93, Number w 



Senate to decide on proposed $6 athletic fee 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 

The Athletic Fee Task Force has 
finally come up with a bill. 

With slightly more than two weeks 
left until Student Senate elections 
and a possible student referendum 
on the proposed athletic fee, a 
$6-a -semester "non-revenue sports 
scholarship fee," as it may now be 
called, will be proposed at the Senate 
Operations Committee meeting at 8 
tonight in the Student Governing Ser- 
vices office in the Union. 

Task force members attended a 
special meeting Friday to finalize 
plans for the bill. 

The fee would make K-State the 
fifth university in the Big Eight Cor 
ference to assess an athletic fee 
students. The other four universi 
are: the University of Kansas, $ i 
semester ; Iowa State Unive , 
$10.50 a semester; the Univers 
Colorado, $16.50 a semester;. 
Oklahoma State University, ab» ] 
a semester. 

Doug Folk, task force chai 
and junior in electrical engine 
said he talked to Athletic Dii 
Larry Travis last week. 

Reagan mus 
take action, 
officials say 

By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - The chair* 
the Senate Foreign Relations '-' 
mittee said Sunday that Pret 
Reagan should consider mililar 
tion in the latest kidnapping of t< 
Americans in Beirut if the host 
takers carry out a threat to Ul 
U.S. citizens. 

Sen. Claiborne Pell, D-R.I., 
Reagan should take "pretty hi 
action against Iran if there is "c 
evidence" that Iran is behind 
latest kidnapping, which occui 
Saturday. However, Pell added, 
it's a group without any govemn 
connection, then... there really it 
good solution." 

Both Pell and Treasury Secret 
James Baker also said they tl 
any Americans remaining in Be 
should leave 

'We're going to continue 
see Americans seized as 1c 
as the world knows that 
will swap arms 
hostages...' 

— Sen. Patrick Lea 

Pell, appearing on ABC-TV's "1 
Week with David Brinkley," I 
"there's not much" Reagan can d 
win the release of the three i 
hostages. 

"I don't envy the president, 
situation he's in now," Pell ■> 
"And if he can really establish a J 
between these terrorists and Syrh 
Iran or any other government 
think he would be justified in gc 
after that government pretty har 
Baker, a member of the Natk 
Security Council, said on NBC-I 
"Meet the Press," that there wit 
clear reason for the kidnapping. 
"We're not sure who took thet 
he said. 

Actually, the Christian-contro 
Voice of Lebanon radio station 
Beirut reported early Sunday thi 
group of pro-Iranian Shiite Mos' 
extremists, calling themselves 
Organization of the Oppressed 
Earth, claimed responsibility for 
kidnappings. 

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., 1 
telephone interview Sunday, agt 
with Pell that "we've got a teat 
anti-terrorist policy. It's Ir 
shambles." 

"We're going to continue to 
Americans seized as long at 
world knows that we will swap a 
for hostages, and that's exactly* 
we did with Iran." said Leahy t 
was vice-chairman of the Senate 
telligence Committee last nn 
when it investigated the Iran II 
Contra controversy. 



Travis said the Department of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics could put 
monies generated from an athletic 
fee into a restricted account. Folk 
told task force members. The money 
could then be channelled directly 
from the students into the restricted 
account, then to the Office of Student 
Financial Assistance. 

"They could even set it up to where 
they (the athletic department) never 
saw the money," Folk said. 

The athletic department would 
also agree to ensure all of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic 
Association-allowed scholarships for 
non-revenue sports were filled, Folk 
said. 

"I was pretty happy that (Travis) 



decided to let revenue from the fee 
fund 40 percent of all non-revenue 
sports scholarships. The athletic 
department would "fill the gap" 
each year, funding the remainder of 
the scholarships. Folk said. 

Currently, the maximum number 
of full scholarships allowed non- 
revenue sports by the NCAA is 89. 



The equivalent number of full 
scholarships awarded at K-State is 
68.63, according to information sup- 
plied by Mike Jones, athletic depart- 
ment business manager. 

The current cost associated with 
an out-of-state scholarship is $5,440 a 
year. An in-state scholarship is $3,525 
a year, Jones said. 



Fully funding all 89 scholarships 
based on out-of-state tuition would 
cost the athletic department $484,000 
annually. Based on in-state tuition, 
the cost would be $314,000 annually. 

Folk said the task force would base 
the athletic fee on out-of-state 
scholarship costs. 

"Obviously, if they can afford to 



— .1 j »-*_ 



*> *< „ tmnfiM" 





Non-Revenue Sports Scholarships 




Non-Revenue Sport 


No. of 

Full Scholarships 

Allowed by NCAA 


Equivalent No, of 

Scholarships Awarded 

by K-State 


No. of Students 

Receiving Scholarships 

at K-5late' 


h* .<.. O 1* -|l 


ii 


in oi 


■>r> 



get the out-of-state athletes, they will 
do that," he said. 

A $6-a -semester athletic fee, based 
on an average of 16,000 students, 
would raise $192,000 a year, about 40 
percent of the required $484,000. 

Summer school students should not 
have to pay the fee because they will 
not benefit from free athletic events, 
members decided. 

The issue of how much to charge 
part-time students was not resolved. 
Steven Johnson, student body presi- 
dent and junior in agricultural 
economics, said fee charges general- 
ly are one-half for part-time 
students, but added the decision was 
up to task force members. 

The final sentences of the bill to be 



M.1M7 



Love That Laughter 

Tickling th e cro wd 's funny bon e 



By SARAH KESSINGER 
Arts and Entertainment Editor 






"Audiences are a strange animal," local 
comedian Mike Mustek once said. And no 
one knows it better than the one up there try- 
ing to make them laugh, .or maybe just 
smile. 

From the times of Roman comedy and 
Medieval court jesters to late nights with 
David Letterman. stand-up comics have 
taken the chance - the risk of silent rejec- 
tion. 

With the rise of television, and the growth 
of cable stations, stand-up comedy moved 
into the household and now more than ever 
proves that winning a chuckle pays off. 

Local amateur comedians Musick, senior 
in theater, John Winningham. 1985 graduate 
in theater, and Andre Kelley, junior in 
speech, recently reflected on the business 
and what it takes for success. All agree that 
stand-up comedy is neither easily created 
nor performed. 

"You have to stimulate the audience's im- 
agination, make sure they're smiling," Win- 
ningham said. "You have to balance the 
show between people laughing and sitting 
back and saying, 'Hmmm, that's an in- 
teresting thought.'" 

Kelley added, "A good comic makes peo- 
ple think, but the bottom line is people love 
to laugh." 

Some people have the crossed arms 
"make me laugh" attitude, Winningham 
said. Stepping up on stage is never the 
same, he added, a comedian never knows 
what to expect. 

"The audience judges what you're wear- 
ing, what you sound like, and most impor- 
tantly what you're talking about," Kelley 
said. 

"Some think if you don't get them in the 
first 30 seconds to the first minute you won't 
get them at ail," he said. 

Testing the waters before the show is im- 
portant. Considering the region of the coun- 
try, the class of people and their 
backgrounds is vital to each night's success. 

"You can't walk up to every dog and pet 
him on the head." Musick said. "You have 
to talk to him and make sure he won't bite 
you on the hand." 

"It is crazy, definitely," Kelley said. 
"Robert Kline says, 'You can do the same 
stuff that worked the night before, and it can 
completely bomb.' It all depends on the at- 
titude of your crowd and your own mood." 

Musick and Winningham worked a couple 
of comedy acts once in a male prison. The 
hecklers, they said, ended up stealing the 
show. 

"There were these loud guys on the front 
row, and I didn't know if they would shut up 
or if they were coming after me. So 1 started 
throwing insults back at them and they lov- 
ed all the attention," Musick said. 

Attacking from a "mutual base" is usual- 
ly necessary for audience approval, he said. 

Kelley recalled the crowd reaction when 
he forgot the "mutual base" during his 
monologue at a talent show in Topeka. 

"It was an audience of parents and they 



brought their kids. Well, they didn't want to 
hear about President Reagan or Madonna's 
armpits or anything like that...! really 
bombed," Kelley said. 

"A lot of the comedians that tour the 
Midwest are from the East Coast and don't 
even think we have cable," Kelley said. 
"They may not think Midwest audiences are 
as sophisticated as we are but if they're 
smart, they'll find that out before the 
show." 

Musick, Winningham and Kelley all write 
their own material or improvise along the 
way. 

"Your stuff comes from current events or 
celebrities; it can be very personal or very 
general," Kelley said. 

"Joan Rivers trivializes everyday 
things," he continued. "I think most comics 
try to show the brighter side of life They 
show us our insecurities, our frustrations, 
and a good comic can make us laugh at 
them. 

"New York comics are well-known for 
opinion comedy. They say things like 'don't 
you hate subways, or don't you hate Jews,' 
and if you agree, it's funny, but if you don't 
you may hate them. 

"New York comics are a little too rough 
on Midwest audiences. They don't go over 
too well usually," Kelley said. "But they 
still say if you can make it in New York you 
can make it anywhere," 

Comedy shows come in two or three 
stages, the warm-up, the intermediate and 
the headliner, with an M.C. between acts. 
Musick said it's always easier for the in- 
termediate and the headliner to have a 
"wanned up" crowd. 

"Hopefully, your showwill be a continual 
build to a high point and end that way leav- 
ing it for the next performer to take it on up 
if he's good," Musick said. 

"It's nice to be a headliner because you 
can feel your way before the show. You find 
the audience's softspot then drill," Musick 
said 

Winningham continued, "It's good to have 
the crowd warmed up. Maybe they've had a 
hard day's work, and they need someone to 
get them into a comedy mood. It's much 
easier if they're already in the mood when 
you begin." 

The comic's nightmare is to open for a 
rock concert, Kelley said. "People come to 
see the band. And if they're waiting for 
them, the last thing they want to see is a 
measly comedian getting up there with a 
mike. 

"It's called 'paying your dues' and many 
agents will send you through stuff like that," 
he said. 

Agents are the key to getting into the com- 
edy business, Musick said Personal con- 
tacts are very important to grab an agent's 
eye and then it's uphill from there — if 
you're good. 

Headliners make about $350 or more a 
night, Kelley said, and middle acts can 
make upwards of $250. An appearance on 
any major nighttime talk show can double 
salaries. 
Good equipment lends itself to stage show 



exposure. "You can put garbage with a good 
set, lights and effects and it'll look decent," 
Musick said. 

None of the three warmed to the thought 
of being on the road, frowning at the men- 
tion of hotel rooms and McDonald's. 
However, the road may be a good way, as 
Kelley noted the "Saturday Night Live" 
cast comes from the minor leagues. 

"The goals of many comics are to tour, 
get into film, get on cable, or act on a sit- 
com," Kelley said. "Most sitcoms are made 
up of veteran night club performers." 

The business can be discouraging, too, 
Kelley said. "A good show will help put you 
back on track. But on the flip side, a bad 
show will make you wonder about your pro- 



fession for a long time. 

"You have to love your work," he said 
"Like Joan Jett says, 'One hour on stagi 
makes up for the 23 others.' 

"It's scary, and there's a feeling of com 
plete vulnerability, but there's also i 
warmth from the crowd," he added. 

The lure of an audience has apparently 
overcome the uncertainty of each perfor 
mance for these three men. They know whai 
not to expect. 

"We're all lemmings, you have to be 
nuts," Kelley said. 

There aren't any foolproof jokes to gain a 
crowd's affection, Winningham pitched in 
"The ultimate one can only be told by God 
and it's so funny you die laughing," 




Staff/Sieve Raunuaen 



^» 



mm 



mmmmmmmmmm 



. 



Inside 




First Address 

Gov. Mike Hay den delivers 
his first State of the State 
address Friday at the state 
capitol in Topeka. See Page 
3. 



1 Weather 




1 




Partly Sunny 


Partly sunny and 
warmer Monday, 
high in mid- to upper 
30s. Wind west to 
southwest 5 to 15 
mph. 



_ . tlUO i i. 

■ - 



valiant Effort 




The Wildcats scratch back 
from a 10-point, second half 
deficit to come within three 
points of the Oklahoma 
Sooners, falling short 81-78. 
See Page 8. 



MS 



I* - 



Kansas 
State 



Kansas State University 




Monday 

January 26. 1987 



Manhattan. Kansas 66506 



Volume 93, Number S4 



Senate to decide on proposed $6 athletic fee 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 

The Athletic Fee Task Force has 
finally come up with a bill. 

With slightly more than two weeks 
left until Student Senate elections 
and a possible student referendum 
on the proposed athletic fee, a 
$6-a -semester "non-revenue sports 
scholarship fee," as it may now be 
called, will be proposed at the Senate 
Operations Committee meeting at 8 
tonight in the Student Governing Ser- 
vices office in the Union. 

Task force members attended a 
special meeting Friday to finalize 
plans for the bill. 

The fee would make K-State the 
fifth university in the Big Eight Con- 
ference to assess an athletic fee to 
students. The other four univerf 1 ^" 
are: the University of Kansas, $ 
semester; Iowa State Unive 
$10.30 a semester; the Univers 
Colorado, $16.50 a spmftstar: 
Oklahoma State University, ab 
a semester. 

Doug Folk, task force chai 
and junior in electrical engine 
said he talked to Athletic Dii 
Larry Travis last week. 

Reagan mus 
take action, 
officials say 



By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - The chain* 
the Senate Foreign Relations - 1 
mittee said Sunday that Pre* 
Reagan should consider militar 
tion in the latest kidnapping of t> 
Americans in Beirut if the hosi 
takers carry out a threat to kil 
U.S. citizens. 

Sen. Claiborne Pell, D-R.I., : 
Reagan should take "pretty m 
action against Iran if there is "c 
evidence" that Iran is behind 
latest kidnapping, which occui 
Saturday. However, Pell added, 
it's a group without any governn 
connection, then ..there really ii 
good solution." 

Both Pell and Treasury Secrel 
James Baker also said they tl 
any Americans remaining in Be 
should leave. 



Travis said the Department of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics could put 
monies generated from an athletic 
fee into a restricted account, Folk 
told task force members. The money 
could then be channelled directly 
from the students into the restricted 
account, then to the Office of Student 
Financial Assistance. 

"They could even set it up to where 
they (the athletic department) never 
saw the money," Folk said. 

The athletic department would 
also agree to ensure all of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic 
Association-allowed scholarships for 
non-revenue sports were filled. Folk 
said. 

"I was pretty happy that (Travis* 
would agree to those restrictions," 
he said. "I like the idea. They're 



decided to let revenue from the fee 
fund 40 percent of all non-revenue 
sports scholarships. The athletic 
department would "fill the gap" 
each year, funding the remainder of 
the scholarships, Folk said. 

Currently, the maximum number 
of full scholarships allowed non- 
revenue sports by the NCAA is 89. 



The equivalent number of full 
scholarships awarded at K -State is 
68.63, according to information sup- 
plied by Mike Jones, athletic depart- 
ment business manager. 

The current cost associated with 
an out-of-state scholarship is $5,440 a 
year. An in-state scholarship is $3,525 
a year, Jones said. 



Fully funding all 89 scholarships 
based on out-of-state tuition would 
cost the athletic department $484,000 
annually. Based on in-state tuition, 
the cost would be $314,000 annually. 

Folk said the task force would base 
the athletic fee on out-of-state 
scholarship costs. 

"Obviously, if they can afford to 





Non-Revenue Sports Scholarships 




Non-Revenue Sport 


No. of 

Full Scholarships 

Allowed by NCAA 


Equivalent No. of 

Scholarships Awarded 

by h State 


No. of Students 

Receiving Scholarships 

at K-Siate* 


Men's Baseball 
Women's Basketball 


13 
15 


10.91 
13 


20 
13 



'We're going to continue 
see Americans seized as lc 
as the world knows that 
will swap arms 
hostages../ 

— Sen. Patrick Lea 



Pell, appearing on ABC TV's "1 
Week with David Brinkley." 
"there's not much" Reagan can <fc 
win the release of the three 
hostages. 

"I don't envy the president, 
situation he's in now," Pell t 
"And if he can really establish a Ii 
between these terrorists and Syria 
Iran or any other government 
think he would be justified in go, 
after that government pretty hart 

Baker, a member of the Natioi 
Security Council, said on NBC-T 
"Meet the Press," that there waa 
clear reason for the kidnapping. 

"We're not sure who took their 
he said. 

Actually, the Christian-control! 
Voice of Lebanon radio station 
Beirut reported early Sunday that 
group of pro-Iranian Shiile Mosla 
extremists, calling themselves t 
Organization of the Oppressed 
Earth, claimed responsibility for It 
kidnappings. 

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-VL, in 
telephone interview Sunday, agrei 
with Pell that "we've got a terrib 
anti-terrorist policy. It's in 
shambles." 

"We're going to continue to I 
Americans seized as long as tt 
world knows that we will swap arB 
for hostages, and that's exactly w 
we did with Iran," said Leahy, wli 
was vice-chairman of the Senate b 
telligence Committee last mont 
when it investigated the Iran arnu 
Contra controversy. I 



get the out-of-state athletes, they will 
do that," he said. 

A (6-a-semester athletic fee, based 
on an average of 16,000 students, 
would raise $192,000 a year, about 40 
percent of the required $484,000. 

Summer school students should not 
have to pay the fee because they will 
not benefit from free athletic events, 
members decided. 

The issue of how much to charge 
part-time students was not resolved. 
Steven Johnson, student body presi- 
dent and junior in agricultural 
economics, said fee charges general- 
ly are one-half for part-time 
students, but added the decision was 
up to task force members. 

The final sentences of the bill to be 
read to Senate Operations Commit- 



tt,1MT 




▼ John Winningham. 1985 graduate 

You have to stimulate the audience's im- 
agination, make sure they're smiling. You 
have to balance the show between people 
laughing and sitting back and saying, 
"Hmmm, that's an interesting thought/" 



Stall /Chris Stewart 



▲ Mike Musick, senior in theater 

You can put garbage with a good set 
lights and effects and it'll look decent 

+ Andre Kelley , junior in speech 

7 think most comics try to show the 
brighter side of life. They show us our in- 
securities, our frustrations, and a good 
comic can make us laugh at them. ' 




II U'W I I-UUH 




Weather 



First Address 

Gov. Mike Hayden delivers 
his first State of the State 
address Friday at the state 
capitol in Topeka. See Page 
3. 



■ - 




Partly Sunny 

Partly sunny and 
warmer Monday, 
high in mid- to upper 
30s. Wind west to 
southwest 5 to 15 
mph. 




valiant Effort 

The Wildcats scratch back 
from a 10-point, second half 
deficit to come within three 
points of the Oklahoma 
Sooners, falling short 81-78. 
See Page 8. 



Kansas 
State 



Monday 

Januarv 26, 1987 



Kansas State University 




Senate to decide on proposed $6 athletic fee 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 

The Athletic Fee Task Force has 
finally come up with a bill. 

With slightly more than two weeks 
left until Student Senate elections 
and a possible student referendum 
on the proposed athletic fee, a 
$6-a-sem ester "non-revenue sports 
scholarship fee," as it may now be 
called, will be proposed at the Senate 
Operations Committee meeting at 8 
tonight in the Student Governing Ser- 
vices office in the Union. 

Task force members attended a 
special meeting Fri^av trt fin»ii7*» 
plans for the bill. 

The fee would mi 
fifth university in tin , 

ference to assess ar 
students. The other I 
are : the University o; 
semester ; Iowa St 
$10.50 a semester; tl 
Colorado, $16.50 a 
Oklahoma State l!nh 
a semester. 

Doug Folk, task I 
and junior in electrii 
said he talked to A 
Larry Travis last we 



Reagan 
take act: 
officials 



By The Associi 

WASHINGTON - ' 
the Senate Foreign 
mittee said Sunday 
Reagan should consi 
tion in the latest kidi 
Americans in Beinil 
takers carry out a t 
U.S. citizens. 

Sen. Claiborne P« 
Reagan should lake 
action against Iran i 
evidence" that Irar 
latest kidnapping, l 
Saturday. However, 
it's a group without i 
connection, then. ,th 
good solution." 

Both Pell and Tret 
James Baker also i 
any Americans rem; 
should leave. 

'We're going to 
see Americans * 
as the world kn 
will swap 
hostages../ 

— Sen. Pi 



Pell, appearing on 
Week with David '. 
"there's not much" I 
win the release of 
hostages. 

"I don't envy the 
situation he's in w 
"And if he can really 
between these terror 
Iran or any other 
think he would be jt 
after that governmei 

Baker, a member 
Security Council, la 
"Meet the Press," tt 
clear reason for the i 

"We're not sure w 
he said. 

Actually, the Chri 
Voice of Lebanon r 
Beirut reported earl; 
group of pro- Irani an 
extremists, calling 
Organization of the 
Earth, claimed respt 
kidnappings. 

Sen. Patrick Leal 
telephone interview i 
with Pell that "we'v 
anti-terrorist polic 
shambles." 

"We're going to i 
Americans seized t 
world knows that we 
for hostages, and tha 
we did with Iran," a 
was vice-chairman 
telligence Committi 
when it invi 
Contra cont 



Travis said the Department of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics could put 
monies generated from an athletic 
fee into a restricted account, Folk 
told task force members. The money 
could then be channelled directly 
from the students into the restricted 
account, then to the Office of Student 
Financial Assistance. 

"They could even set it up to where 
they (the athletic department) never 
saw the money," Folk said. 

The athletic department would 
also agree to ensure all of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic 
Association-allowed scholarships for 

nnn-niusniw cruirfa were fillpri Folk 



I Friday, January 23, W7 

Film Review 

Hanson film 
mere collage 
of Hitchcock 



By GARY JOHNSON 
Collegian Reviewer 



decided to let revenue from the fee 
fund 40 percent of all non-revenue 
sports scholarships. The athletic 
department would "fill the gap" 
each year, funding the remainder of 
the scholarships, Folk said. 

Currently, the maximum number 
of full scholarships allowed non- 
revenue sports by the NCAA is 89. 



The equivalent number of full 
scholarships awarded at K-State is 
68.63, according to information sup- 
plied by Mike Jones, athletic depart- 
ment business manager. 

The current cost associated with 
an out-of-state scholarship is $5,440 a 
year. An in-state scholarship is $3,525 
a year, Jones said. 



Fully funding all 89 scholarships 
based on out-of-state tuition would 
cost the athletic department $484,000 
annually. Based on in-state tuition, 
the cost would be $314,000 annually. 

Folk said the task force would base 
the athletic fee on out-of-state 
scholarship costs. 

"Obviously, if they can afford to 



Non-Revenue Sports Scholarships 



No. of 

Full <w*nl. ln tH« 



Equivalent No. of 



No. of Students 



get the out-of-state athletes, they will 
do that," he said. 

A $6-a-semester athletic fee, based 
on an average of 16,000 students, 
would raise $192,000 a year, about 40 
percent of the required $484,000. 

Summer school students should not 
have to pay the fee because they will 
not benefit from free athletic events, 
members decided. 

The issue of how much to charge 
part-time students was not resolved. 
Steven Johnson, student body presi- 
dent and junior in agricultural 
economics, said fee charges general- 
ly are one-half for part-time 



After only 10 minutes into "The 
Bedroom Window," it's clear 
we're in the hands of an Alfred Hit- 
chcock fanatic. All the usual Hit- 
chcock ingredients — the cool 
blonde, the crime only observed by 
a single person, the innocent man 
the police believe guilty — are pre- 
sent. 

But while writer/director Curtis 
Hanson's admiration for Hitchcock 
seems genuine, his film is little 
more than a collage of other better 
films. The title itself bears more 
than just a passing similarity to 
"Rear Window." And the plot is a 
combination of "Frenzy" and 
"North by Northwest." In addi- 
tion, Hanson has thrown in a scene 
reminiscent of the concert hall 
scenes in "The Man Who Knew Too 
Much" and "Torn Curtain." 

"The Bedroom Window" is about 
as derivative as movies get, but, 
surprisingly, it's also fun to watch. 
It's the story of a young business 
executive, Terry Lambert (played 
by Steve Guttenberg), who has an 
affair with the boss' wife, Sylvia 
(played by I sa belie Huppert). 
While she's at Terry's apartment 
late one night, she witnesses, from 
the bedroom window, an attack 
upon a young woman (Elizabeth 
McGovern). But because Sylvia's 
married, she won't go to the police 
Terry takes her place, memorizing 
everything she says about the 
assault, and reports the crime. But 
it's not quite this easy, especially 
when the police ask him to identify 
the leading suspect during a police 
lineup. 

From here the complications 
multiply: He's forced to testify in 
court, where the defense attorney 
(played by Wallace Shawn) cuts 
him to ribbons. And now, with the 
police believing he lied from the 
beginning, he becomes a chief 
suspect in the recent spree of 
murders. In the meantime, the 
real killer plots to kill Sylvia, and 
thus get rid of the one person who 
can clear Terry. 

Many of these scenes are real 
nail-biters. But the movie is han- 
dicapped by the miscasting of Gut- 

See WINDOW, Page 7 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 27 


, 1987 
















11 to be 

tmmit 


KSNT 


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WEDNES 


JANUAI 

KTKA 


W 28, 1987 
















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USE THE COLLEGIAN 
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/ 



«v 



■ | 



■i 






Weather 




First Address 

Gov. Mike Hayden delivers 
his first State of the State 
address Friday at the state 
capitol in Topeka. See Page 
3. 




Partly Sunny 

Partly sunny and 
warmer Monday, 
high in mid- to upper 
30s. Wind west to 
southwest 5 to 15 
mph. 



* - 



valiant Effort 




The Wildcats scratch back 
from a 10-point, second half 
deficit to come within three 
points of the Oklahoma 
Sooner s, falling short 81-78. 
See Page 8. 



Kansas 
State 



Kansas State University 




Monday 

January 26. (987 



Manhattan. Kansas €6506 



Volume 93. Number H4 



Senate to decide on proposed $6 athletic fee 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 

The Athletic Fee Task Force has 
finally come up with a hill. 

With slightly more than two weeks 
left until Student Senate elections 
and a possible student referendum 
on the proposed athletic fee, a 
$6-a-semester "non-revenue sports 
scholarship fee," as it may now be 
called, will be proposed at the Senate 
Operations Committee meeting at 8 
tonight in the Student Governing Ser- 
vices office in the Union. 

Task force members attended a 
special meeting Friday to finalize 
plans for the bill. 

The fee would make K-State the 
fifth university in the Big Eight Con- 
ference to assess an athletic fee to 
students. The other four univeir i * iM: 
are: the University of Kansas, ft 
semester; Iowa State Unive 
$10.50 a semester; the Univers 
Colorado, $16.50 a semester; 
Oklahoma State University, ah 
a semester. 

Doug Folk, task force chai 
and junior in electrical engine 
said he talked to Athletic Oil 
Larry Travis last week. 

Reagan mus 
take action, 
officials say 

By The Associated Prea> 

WASHINGTON - The chain* 
the Senate Foreign Relations 
mittee said Sunday that Prat 
Reagan should consider mil i tar 
tion in the latest kidnapping of t 
Americans in Beirut if the host 
takers carry out a threat to HI 
U.S. citizens. 

Sen. Claiborne Pell, DR. I., 
Reagan should take "pretty ht 
action against Iran if there is "c 
evidence" that Iran is behind 
latest kidnapping, which occui 
Saturday. However, Pell added, 
it's a group without any governn 
connection, then... there really i: 
good solution." 

Both Pell and Treasury Secret 
James Baker also said they tt 
any Americans remaining in Be 
should leave. 

'We're going to continue 
see Americans seized as lc 
as the world knows that 
will swap arms f 
hostages../ 

— Sen. Patrick Lea 

Pell, appearing on ABC- TV's "1 
Week with David Brink ley." s 
"there's not much" Reagan can o\ 
win the release of the three n 
hostages. 

"I don't envy the president, i 
situation he's in now," Pell sa 
"And if he can really establish a li 
between these terrorists and Syria 
Iran or any other government, 
think he would be justified in got 
after that government pretty hare 
Baker, a member of the Natiw 
Security Council, said on NBC-T 
"Meet the Press," that there waa 
clear reason for the kidnapping. 

"We're not sure who took them 
he said. 

Actually, the Christian-contrott 
Voice of Lebanon radio station 
Beirut reported early Sunday that 
group of pro- Iranian Shiite Moslfc 
extremists, calling themselves tr 
Organization of the Oppressed c 
Earth, claimed responsibility for tr 
kidnappings. 

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., in 
telephone interview Sunday, agree 
with Pell that "we've got a terrib) 
anti-terrorist policy. It's in 
shambles." 

"We're going to continue to m 
Americans seized as long as th 
world knows that we will swap arm 
for hostages, and that's exactly wha 
we did with Iran," said Leahy, wh 
was vice-chairman of the Senate Jr 
telligence Committee last mont! 
when it investigated the Iran arnu 
Contra controversy. 






Travis said the Department of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics could put 
monies generated from an athletic 
fee into a restricted account, Folk 
told task force members. The money 
could then be channelled directly 
from the students into the restricted 
account, then to the Office of Student 
Financial Assistance. 

"They could even set it up to where 
they (the athletic department) never 
saw the money," Folk said. 

The athletic department would 
also agree to ensure all of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic 
Association-allowed scholarships for 
non-revenue sports were filled, Folk 
said. 

"I was pretty happy that (Travis) 
would agree to those restrictions," 
he said. "I like the idea. They're 



decided to let revenue from the fee 
fund 40 percent of all non-revenue 
sports scholarships. The athletic 
department would "fill the gap" 
each year, funding the remainder of 
the scholarships, Folk said. 

Currently, the maximum number 
of full scholarships allowed non- 
revenue sports by the NCAA is 89. 



The equivalent number of full 
scholarships awarded at K-State is 
68.63, according to infottnation sup- 
plied by Mike Jones, athletic depart- 
ment business manager. 

The current cost associated with 
an out-of-state scholarship is $5,440 a 
year. An in-state scholarship is $3,525 
a year, Jones said. 



Fully funding all 89 scholarships 
based on out-of-state tuition would 
cost the athletic department $484,000 
annually. Based on in-state tuition, 
the cost would be $314,000 annually. 

Folk said the task force would base 
the athletic fee on out-of-state 
scholarship costs. 

"Obviously, if they can afford to 



- .. -r.1 »« 1 •- 





Non-Revenue Sports Scholarships 




Non- Revenue Sport 


No. of 

Full Scholarships 

Allowed by NCAA 


Equivalent No. of 

Scholarships Awarded 

by K-State 


No. of Students 

Receiving Scholarships 

at K-State* 


Men's Baseball 
Women's Basketball 


13 
15 


10.91 
13 


20 
Ml 



get the out-of-state athletes, they will 
do that," he said. 

A $6-a-semester athletic fee, based 
on an average of 16,000 students, 
would raise $192,000 a year, about 40 
percent of the required $484,000. 

Summer school students should not 
have to pay the fee because they will 
not benefit from free athletic events, 
members decided. 

The issue of how much to charge 
part-time students was not resolved. 
Steven Johnson, student body presi- 
dent and junior in agricultural 
economics, said fee charges general- 
ly are one-half for part-time 
students, but added the decision was 
up to task force members. 

The final sentences of the bill to be 
read to Senate Operations Commit- 




, JANUARY 29, 1987 



Friday, Januury 23.JW 



KSNT 



■wiw KTKA KSHB KTWU WGN WTBS HBO SHOW MAX 



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Continued from Page 6 



8 



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overdoes her (supposedly sexy) 
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itating Catherine Deneuve. 

Elizabeth McGovern fares much 
better as a near victim of the 
killer. This is her most mature role 
to date, but near the movie's end 
the screenplay forces her (as well 
as Steve Guttenberg* into some in- 
credibly stupid situations. This is 
the movie's biggest problem. In 
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probabilities multiply until they 
completely undermine the movie's 
credibility. 

"The Bedroom Window" is 
never a boring movie, but Hanson 
directs like a child showing off all 
the toys in his closet. The problem 
is none of the toys are his own. 




All shows starting before 

6 p.m.— all seats $2.50 

Movie info. 539-1291 

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First Address 

Gov. Mike Hayden delivers 
his first State of the State 
address Friday at the state 
capitol in Topeka. See Page 
3. 



Weather 










J^ 


Partly Sunny 


Partly sunny and 
warmer Monday, 
high in mid- to upper 
30s. Wind west to 
southwest 5 to 15 

mph. 

■ 



' - 



- 



6u61« 




valiant Effort 

The Wildcats scratch back 
from a 10-point, second half 
deficit to come within three 
points of the Oklahoma 
Sooners, falling short 81-78. 
See Page 8. 






Kansas 
State 



Kansas State University 




Monday 

January 26, 1987 



Manhattan, Kansas 66506 



Vohtne 93, Number X4 



Senate to decide on proposed $6 athletic fee 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 

The Athletic Fee Task Force has 
finally come up with a bill. 

With slightly more than two weeks 
left until Student Senate elections 
and a possible student referendum 
on the proposed athletic fee, a 
$6-a -semester "non -revenue sports 
scholarship fee," as it may now be 
called, will be proposed at the Senate 
Operations Committee meeting at 8 
tonight in the Student Governing Ser- 
vices office in the Union. 

Task force members attended a 
special meeting Friday to finalize 
plans for the bill 

The fee would 
fifth university it 
ference to asses. a 

students. The ott 
are: theUniversi 
semester; Iowa 
$10.50 a semestei 
Colorado, $16.50 
Oklahoma State ■ 
a semester, 

Doug Folk, la 
and junior in ete 
said he talked U 
Larry Travis last 

Reagai 
take ac . 
official 

By The Ass 

WASHINGTON 
the Senate Fore) 
mittee said Sum 
Reagan should cc 
tion in the latest I 
Americans in He 
takers carry out 
U.S. citizens. 

Sen. Claiborne 
Reagan should U 
action against Ira 
evidence" that I 
latest kidnapping 
Saturday. Howevi 
it's a group wi then 
connection, then., 
good solution." 

Both Pell and T 
James Baker als 
any Americans re 
should leave. 

'We're going i * 
see Americans 
as the world 1 
will swap 
hostages...' 
— Sen. 



Pell, appearing < 
Week with Davie 
"there's not much' 
win the release r 
hostages. 

"I don't envy t 
situation he's in 
"And if he can rea. 
between these tern 
Iran or any othe 
think he would be 
after that governm 

Baker, a membt 
Security Council, s 
"Meet the Press," 
clear reason for th 

"We're not sure 
he said. 

Actually, the Ch 
Voice of Lebanon 
Beirut reported eai 
group of pro-Iranii 
extremists, calling 
Organization of tr 
Earth, claimed res| 
kidnappings 

Sen. Patrick L© 
telephone interview 
with Pell that "we' 
anti-terrorist pol 
shambles." 

"We're going to 
Americans seized 
world knows that w 
for hostages, and th 
we did with Iran," 
was vice-chairman 
telligence Commit 
when it investigate) 
Contra controversy 



Travis said the Department of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics could put 
monies generated from an athletic 
fee into a restricted account. Folk 
told task force members. The money 
could then be channelled directly 
from the students into the restricted 
account, then to the Office of Student 
Financial Assistance. 

"They could even set it up to where 
they (the athletic department) never 
saw the money," Folk said. 

The athletic department would 
also agree to ensure all of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic 
Association-allowed scholarships for 
non-revenue sports were filled, Folk 



Friday, Januar y 23, 1M7 



decided to let revenue from the fee 
fund « percent of all non-revenue 
sports scholarships. The athletic 
department would "fill the gap" 
each year, funding the remainder of 
the scholarships, Folk said. 

Currently, the maximum number 
of full scholarships allowed non- 
revenue sports by the NCAA is 89. 



The equivalent number of full 
scholarships awarded at K-State is 
68.63, according to information sup- 
plied by Mike Jones, athletic depart- 
ment business manager. 

The current cost associated with 
an out-of-state scholarship is $5,440 a 
year. An in-state scholarship is $3,525 
a vear, Jones said. 



Fully funding all 89 scholarships 
based on out-of-state tuition would 
cost the athletic department $484,000 
annually. Based on in-state tuition, 
the cost would be $314,000 annually. 

Folk said the task force would base 
the athletic fee on out-of-state 
scholarship costs, 

"Obviously, if they can afford to 



Non-Revenue Sports Scholarships 



No. of 
Full Scholarships 



Equivalent No. of 
Scholarship* Awarded 



No. of Students 
Recti vino SrhnUrskir 



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get the out-of-state athletes, they will 
do that," he said. 

A $f>-a -semester athletic fee. based 
on an average of 16,000 students, 
would raise $192,000 a year, about 40 
percent of the required $484,000 

Summer school students should not 
have to pay the fee because they will 
not benefit from free athletic events, 
members decided. 

The issue of how much to charge 
part-time students was not resolved. 
Steven Johnson, student body presi- 
dent and junior in agricultural 
economics, said fee charges general 
ly are one-half for part-time 
lecision was 
*. 

tie bill to be 
ts Commit- 



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ed to be the 
•fiting KSU 
if such a 
dent body, 
etermined 
to support 
nt fee, and 
conducted 
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nethod of 



ss 
ue 



Hit it does 

statistics 
mi that the 
errent. He 
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nation in- 
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Minority, 
rded and 

T, Page 12 



or 
1 



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jvernor of 
late, told 
dquarters 
1. 

Is predic- 
ts Chris- 
Bn va rian 
in Social 
it, accor- 
ported by 
The two 
J<tA.8per- 

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ic Party 
■ vote, up 

it slightly 
Vest Ger- 
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the vote. 



, Page 12 



mm 



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Inside 




Weather 



■ 



First Address 

Gov. Mike Hayden delivers 
his first State of the State 
address Friday at the state 
capitol in Topeka. See Page 
3. 




Partly Sunny 

Partly sunny and 
warmer Monday, 
high in mid- to upper 
30s. Wind west to 
southwest 5 to 15 
mph. 




. 



valiant Effort 

The Wildcats scratch back 
from a 10-point, second half 
deficit to come within three 
points of the Oklahoma 
Sooners, falling short 81-78. 
See Page 8. 



'[ 



Kansas 
State 



Kansas State University 




Monday 

January 26. 1987 



Manhattan. Kansas $6506 



Volume 93. Number 84 



Senate to decide on proposed $6 athletic fee 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 

The Athletic Fee Task Force has 
finally come up with a bill. 

With slightly more than two weeks 
left until Student Senate elections 
and a possible student referendum 
on the proposed athletic fee, a 
$6-a-semester "non-revenue sports 
scholarship fee," as it may now be 
called, will be proposed at the Senate 
Operations Committee meeting at 8 
tonight in the Student Governing Ser- 
vices office in the Union. 

Task force members attended a 
special meeting Friday to finalize 
plans for the bill. 

The fee would make K-State the 
fifth university in the Big Eight Con- 
ference to assess an athletic fee to 
students. The other four universities 
are: the University of Kansas, $6.50 a 
semester; Iowa State University, 
$10.50 a semester ; the University of 
Colorado, $16.50 a semester; and 
Oklahoma State University, about $7 
a semester. 

Doug Folk, task force chairman 
and junior in electrical engineering, 
said he talked to Athletic Director 
Larry Travis last week. 

Reagan must 
take action, 
officials say 

By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - The chairman of 
the Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee said Sunday that President 
Reagan should consider military ac- 
tion in the latest kidnapping of three 
Americans in Beirut if the hostage- 
takers carry out a threat to kill the 
U.S. citizens. 

Sen. Claiborne Pell, DR. I., said 
Reagan should take "pretty hard" 
action against Iran if there is "clear 
evidence" that Iran is behind the 
latest kidnapping, which occurred 
Saturday. However, Pell added, "if 
it's a group without any government 
connection, then... there really is no 
good solution." 

Both Pell and Treasury Secretary 
James Baker also said they think 
any Americans remaining in Beirut 
should leave. 

'We're going to continue to 
see Americans seized as long 
as the world knows that we 
will swap arms (or 
hostages...' 

— Sen. Patrick Leahy 

Pell, appearing on ABC-TV's "This 
Week with David Brinkley," said 
"there's not much" Reagan can do to 
win the release of the three new 
hostages. 

"I don't envy the president, the 
situation he's in now," Pell said. 
"And if he can really establish a link 
between these terrorists and Syria or 
Iran or any other government, I 
think he would be justified in going 
after that government pretty hard." 

Baker, a member of the National 
Security Council, said on NBC-TV's 
"Meet the Press," that there was no 
clear reason for the kidnapping 

"We're not sure who took them," 
he said. 

Actually, the Christian-controlled 
Voice of Lebanon radio station in 
Beirut reported early Sunday that a 
group of pro- Iranian Shiite Moslem 
extremists, calling themselves the 
Organization of the Oppressed on 
Earth, claimed responsibility for the 
kidnappings. 

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., in a 
telephone interview Sunday, agreed 
with Pell that "we've got a terrible 
a nti -terrorist policy. It's in a 
shambles." 

"We're going to continue to see 
Americans seized as long as the 
world knows that we will swap arms 
for hostages, and that's exactly what 
we did with Iran," said Leahy, who 
was vice-chairman of the Senate In- 
telligence Committee last month 
when it investigated the Iran arms- 
Contra controversy. 



Travis said the Department of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics could put 
monies generated from an athletic 
fee into a restricted account. Folk 
told task force members. The money 
could then be channelled directly 
from the students into the restricted 
account, then to the Office of Student 
Financial Assistance. 

"They could even set it up to where 
they <the athletic department) never 
saw the money," Folk said. 

The athletic department would 
also agree to ensure all of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic 
Association-allowed scholarships for 
non-revenue sports were filled, Folk 
said. 

"I was pretty happy that (Travis) 
would agree to those restrictions," 
he said. "I like the idea. They're 
agreeing not to touch our money and 
they're agreeing not to take their 
money out." 

"I think it's great you can put (the 
money) into an account where (the 
athletic department) can't get their 
hands on it," said Kirk Caraway, 
senior in political science. "That was 
our main objective." 

In selecting an amount for the 
athletic fee, task force members 



decided to let revenue from the fee 
fund 40 percent of all non-revenue 
sports scholarships The athletic 
department would "fill the gap" 
each year, funding the remainder of 
the scholarships, Folk said. 

Currently, the maximum number 
of full scholarships allowed non- 
revenue sports by the NCAA is 89. 



The equivalent number of full 
scholarships awarded at K -State is 
68.63, according to information sup- 
plied by Mike Jones, athletic depart- 
ment business manager. 

The current cost associated with 
an out-of-state scholarship is $5,440 a 
year. An in-state scholarship is $3,525 
a year, Jones said. 



Fully funding all 89 scholarships 
based on out-of-state tuition would 
cost the athletic department $484,000 
annually. Based on in-state tuition, 
the cost would be $314,000 annually. 

Folk said the task force would base 
the athletic fee on out-of-state 
scholarship costs. 

"Obviously, if they can afford to 



Non-Revenue Sports Scholarships 





No. of 


Equivalent No. of 


No. of Students 




Full Scholarships 


Scholarships Awarded 


Receiving Scholarships 


Non-Revenue Sport 


Allowed by NCAA 


by JsSt.Hr 


at K- State* 


Men's Baseball 


13 


10,91 


20 


Women's Basketball 


15 


13 


13 


Men's Golf 


5 


2.92 


6 


Women's Colt 


6 


1.3 


4 


Men's Track -Cross Country 


M 


13.32 


25 


Women's Track-Cross Country 


16 


J 4. 48 


22 


Women's Tennis 


8 


3.1 


7 


Women's Volleyball 


12 


9.6 


11 


Totals 


89 


60.63 


108 



' Not all full scholarships 



get the out-of-state athletes, they will 
do that," he said. 

A $6-a -semester athletic fee. based 
on an average of 16,000 students, 
would raise $192,000 a year, about 40 
percent of the required $484,000. 

Summer school students should not 
have to pay the fee because they will 
not benefit from free athletic events, 
members decided. 

The issue of how much to charge 
part-time students was not resolved. 
Steven Johnson, student body presi- 
dent and junior in agricultural 
economics, said fee charges general- 
ly are one-half for part-time 
students, but added the decision was 
up to task force members. 

The final sentences of the bill to be 
read to Senate Operations Commit 
tee tonight read as follows : 

"Whereas, this is believed to be the 
most feasible way of benefiting KSU 
athletics through a fee if such a 
desire exists within the student body, 
and whereas, it must be determined 
if the student body desires to support 
KSU athletics with a student fee, and 
whereas, a referendum conducted 
during the general election is the 
most logical and fair method of 
determining this desire." 




Opponents discuss 
death penalty issue 



By DERON JOHNSON 
Collegian Reporter 



Staff /Jim tiiHz 



To help his students understand the different people and cultures In Latin America, Douglas Benson, associate 
professor of Spanish, uses the guitar In his Spanish classes during the semester. 

Guitar assists Spanish professor 



By SALLY NEARY 
Collegian Reporter 



When it comes to teaching 
cultural differences of Spanish- 
speaking countries, Douglas Ben- 
son picks up his guitar. 

The associate professor of 
Spanish, who plays mostly Latin 
American music in his Spanish 
classes, said he hopes to help 
students understand the different 
people and cultures in Latin 
America and to heighten their in- 



terest in the music from these 
countries. 

A native of Taos, N.M., Benson 
grew up in an environment where 
families played and listened to 
Spanish music on the guitar. He 
said he had always wanted to play, 
so when he was 15 years old, he 
bought his first guitar for (15 from 
a friend's uncle. Drawing on 10 
years of piano lessons, Benson 
taught himself how to play. 

While in college at New Mexico 
State University and later at the 



University of New Mexico, Benson 
began playing classical guitar 
music from the Baroque and 
Renaissance periods. 

Before coming to K-State, Ben- 
son taught for 11 years at Hastings 
College in Hastings, Neb. After two 
or three years there, Benson 
discovered he could help students 
understand differences between 
the Spanish-speaking countries by 
playing music from the different 

See BENSON, Page 12 



Opponents of the death penalty 
convened Saturday on campus to 
discuss capital punishment and how 
the tide toward its adoption can be 
slowed. Principle speakers were 
David Kingsley and Bill Lucero, both 
of the Kansas Coalition Against the 
Death Penalty. 

Robert Bryan, a San Francisco at- 
torney representing more than 100 
men on America's death row, was to 
have been the forum's featured 
speaker, but Kingsley said profes- 
sional obligations prevented him 
from attending. 

Although Kingsley and Lucero 
have both had family members die at 
the hands of murderers, they remain 
vehemently opposed to the death 
penalty. However, they told about 60 
people attending the presentation 
they understand the feelings of vic- 
tims 

"I've seen a member of my family 
suffer," said Kingsley, whose sister 
was killed by a man currently serv- 
ing on Missouri's death row. "I know 
what it's like. I think society needs to 
be of more help to victims." 

However, more stringent sentenc- 
ing is the answer — not state- 
sponsored execution, Kingsley said. 
He said the primary justification 
cited by supporters for the adoption 
of capital punishment is revenge. 

"If there were any practical value 
to this other than sheer revenge... we 
are beginning to hear from pro- 
ponents to the death penalty who say 



'yes, it's not a deterrent but it does 
get revenge.'" 

Kingsley presented statistics 
which support his contention that the 
death penalty is not a deterrent. He 
said Texas and Florida, two states 
with the death penalty, have the 
highest number of convicts on death 
row. the highest number of execu- 
tions and are ranked first and second 
respectively in national homicide 
rates. 

In 1979, New Mexico re-enacted the 
death penalty, and its murder rate 
rose by 22 percent over 1978's rate. 
Also in 1979, Rhode Islands death 
penalty was declared unconstitu- 
tional, and its homicide rate subse- 
quently fell by 20 percent, according 
to figures provided by the Coalition. 

Furthermore, the death penalty 
may actually directly weaken the 
legal system. He said in Illinois the 
prosecution often can't afford to try 
cases because the expenses of 
capital punishment have depleted 
legal reservoirs. As a result, plea 
bargaining is now occurring with in- 
creasing frequency in the state 

Lucero, whose father was 
murdered, said execution does 
nothing but rekindle old anger. 

"We (only) make ourselves 
angrier," he said. "Since when has 
revenge decreased anger? It 
doesn't." 

Lucero said the discrimination in- 
herent in capital punishment is 
another reason to reject it. Minority, 
uneducated, mentally retarded and 



See OPPONENT. Pane 12 



German chancellor 
returns to control 



By The Associated Press 

BONN, West Germany - West 
German voters returned Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's conservative coalition 
to power Sunday, but reduced their 
support for his Christian Democratic 
Party. The anti-NATO Greens made 
impressive gains. 

Computer projections, which have 
proved highly accurate in the past, 
showed a significant drop in support 
for Kohl's party compared with the 
last national elections, four years 
ago. But the results showed his coali- 
tion with the small Free Democratic 
Party was in no danger. 

Johannes Kau, who ran for 
chancellor under the banner of the 
main opposition Social Democratic 
Party, conceded defeat on national 
television an hour after the polls clos- 
ed at 6 p.m. 

"We wanted a change in the 



government, and we didn't get it. We 
are the losers," Rau, the governor of 
North Rhine-Westphalia state, told 
reporters at his party's headquarters 
in Bonn, the federal capital 

Despite pre-election polls predic- 
ting a strong win for Kohl, his Chris- 
tian Democrats and their Bavarian 
sister party, the Christian Social 
Union, received 44 percent, accor- 
ding to final projections reported by 
West German television. The two 
parties received a combined 48. S per 
cent or the vote in 1983. 

The projections said the business 
oriented Free Democratic Party 
received 8,8 percent of the vote, up 
from 7 percent in 1983. 

The Social Democrats lost slightly 
from their 1983 returns. West Ger- 
man television's final projections 
gave them 37.6 percent of the vote, 

See ELECTION, Pa K f 12 



^J>M 



ia^ 



TW^mi 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Monday, January 26, 1987 




riefly 



By The Associated Press 



INTERNATIONAL 

Troops prepare for protest action 

MANILA, Philippines - Troops were placed on "red alert" in 
Manila on Monday as thousands of people prepared to march on the 
presidential palace to protest last week's killing by soldiers of 12 
demonstrators. 

Officials of Bay an, the nation's largest leftist organization, told 
reporters they would meet with President Corazon Aquino before the 
march but vowed to go ahead with their plans regardless of the out- 
come of the talks. 

Brig. Gen. Romeo Zulueta, who replaced Brig. Gen. Ramon Mon- 
tana as commander of the Manila region, ordered troops to arrest 
any "troublemakers." Soldiers were put on red alert, which means 
they must be ready to be deployed if needed. 

Montano was placed on leave until a special presidential commis- 
sion completes its investigation into the shooting of the 12 
demonstrators. 

About 10,000 peasants and supporters of their demands for land 
reform marched toward Aquino's office last Thursday. At Mendiola 
bridge near the palace, they forced a line of police to retreat. 
Marines behind the police fired on the protesters, killing 12 and 
wounding 94. 

Both left- and right-wing groups condemned the "Mendiola 
massacre," the bloodiest street clash of Aquino's young presidency. 

The crisis comes right before a Feb. 2 plebiscite on a new constitu- 
tion, which is regarded as a vote of confidence in Aquino's steward- 
ship. 



Passengers stabilize jet's landing 

MOSCOW — When an Aeroflot jetliner's nose landing gear failed to 
drop, the captain ordered all 92 passengers to crowd toward the tail 
section in hopes of a more stable landing, Tass reported Sunday. 

The Tu-154 was flying from Moscow to the southern city of Ord- 
zhonikidze last Monday when a red warning light flight indicated a 
landing gear malfunction, Tass said. In-flight maneuvers failed to 
shake the gear loose, and fuel was running low. 

"All passengers were promptly transferred to the rear compart- 
ment so that the liner wouldn't dive right after touchdown," Tass 
said. "Going into reverse and engaging flaps, the crew landed the 
plane, its nose gradually lowering and scraping off myriads of sparks 
on its run until the craft finally came to a screeching halt." 

Rescue squads helped evacuate the passengers, who used emergen- 
cy chutes, Tass said. It said there was "insignificant damage" to the 
plane, and "no loss of life." 

Tass did not say if there were any injuries. 

Police question activist, daughter 

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Police took black activist Win- 
nie Mandela and her daughter from their home in the black township 
of Soweto Sunday but released them after questioning Mandela for 
about 54 hours, her lawyer said. 

The lawyer, Ismail Ayob, said he was not present during the ques- 
tioning at the Protea police station in Soweto, but that Mandela told 
him afterward it appeared to be "routine." 

Ayob said that at about 5 p.m. police took her from her home in the 
black township outside Johannesburg, and returned an hour after 
that for her daughter, Zinzi. 

Police also took a filing cabinet filled with documents belonging to 
Mandela, said Ayob. The cabinet was returned, and it did not appear 
that any documents had been taken, he said. 

Ayob said he had not talked very long with Mandela after she and 
her daughter were released. 



NA TIONAL 

Racist vows politicians' removal 

CUMMING, Ga. — A day after this all-white community was cram- 
med with up to 25,000 marchers demanding racial tolerance, 
ministers complained Sunday that Gumming had been characterized 
unfairly. 

But a counterdemonstrator, one of 56 people arrested in the South 's 
largest civil rights demonstration since the 1960s, said he would work 
to oust the officials who welcomed the marchers. 

"The politicians and system stooges are through here," said Frank 
Shirley, Forsyth County leader of the White Patriot Party, a 
militaristic white supremacist group. 

"We're going to put our own candidates in the next election," he 
was quoted as saying in Sunday's editions of the Forsyth County 
News. 

The marchers had come in response to a Jan. 17 attack by a jeer- 
ing crowd of 400 Ku Klux Klansmen and their supporters who pelted 
about 75 marchers with bottles, rocks and mud. p 

Televised images of that attack spurred Saturday's huge turnout 
that left behind some would-be marchers in Atlanta when more than 
160 packed charter buses were filled. 

"It looked like Forsyth County is the worst place in the world to 
live, and is filled with the most hateful people," the Rev. Gary 
Armes told his Sunday congregation at the First Christian Church. "I 
wanted to shake the TV and say. 'That's not so!'" 

REGIONAL 

Legislators disagree on waste site 

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Lawmakers from southern Arkansas 
disagree whether the state should withdraw from a compact with 
four other states to develop a central dumpsite for low-level radioac- 
tive waste. 

Sen. Jim Scott, D-Warren, said in an interview that he plans to br- 
ing up, in about a week, his bill that would pull Arkansas out of the 
Central Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact Commis- 
sion. 

That commission — comprising Nebraska, Kansas, Louisiana, 
Oklahoma and Arkansas — has outlined six sites in Dallas, Cleveland 
and Jefferson counties as possible dump sites. 

Reports of preliminary studies of the area's geological makeup 
have caused controversy. Scott's pledge to introduce the legislation 
to pull Arkansas from the compact came at an emotion-charged 
public hearing on the matter in Kison recently. 

Rep. Robin F. Wynne, D-Fordyce, has said he has received indica- 
tions that Kansas and Nebraska are likely sites for the dump. Both 
Wynne and Scott have voiced opposition to putting a dump site in the 
area, in part because of concerns about leakage. 

House debates liquor law changes 

TOPEKA — House debate on a measure to reinstate the death 
penalty and hearings on possible sweeping changes in the state's li- 
quor laws are expected to command attention at the Capitol as the 
1987 Kansas Legislature enters its third week. 

Legislative supporters and opponents of capital punishment are 
scheduled to square off on the House floor Wednesday over a bill that 
would make death by lethal injection a possible sentence for anyone 
convicted of first-degree murder or felony murder in Kansas. 

Arguments on both sides of the issue are likely to be heated, 
especially in view of Gov. Mike Hayden's promise to sign any death 
penalty bill that lands on his desk in proper form. 

However, a number of.ke)L lawmakers predict passage of the 
measure when it comes up for a final vote Thursday. 



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PARSONS 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

Special Summer Programs 

FRANCE 
WEST AFRICA 

ITALY 

GREAT BRITAIN 

JAPAN 

NEW YORK 



International programs are offered for students, 
teachers and working professionals. Courses 
include: archaeology; architectural history; art 
history; clay and textile design; decorative arts; 
drawing; fashion; graphic design; painting and 
photography. Undergraduate and graduate credits 
are available to qualified participants. For more 
information, please mail the coupon below or 
call the Parsons Office of Special Programs: 
(212) 741-8975. 



Parsons School of Design, Office of Special Programs 
66 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10011 

Please send me a brochure on ftrsons Special Summer 
Programs. 

Name 



Address . 
City 



.State. 



.Zip. 



26 



Campus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



U-LEAHN is looking for a lew good volunteer* 
lor this spring Don't waste away the spring hours 
- be a U-LearN volunteer. Call M2-6442 or slop 
by Holtim Hall 02 

ENGLISH CONVERSATIONAL TUTORING 
PROGRAM, offered by the International Student 
Center, needs volunteer tutors For more Infor- 
mation, call Karen at 532-6448 

STUDENT ELECTIONS COMMITTEE: Piling 

deadline for SGA elections is Tuesday. Applica- 
tions are available in the SGS office for student 
body president, student senators and Board of 
Student Publications 

ALPHA ML' ALPHA: All resumes are due Fri- 
day, and members should contact Teresa 
[eighty Also, there will be a field trip Friday lo 
Hallmark Members should contact Angie 
Rowland if interested 

AG STUDENT COUNCIL ELECTION AP- 
PLICATIONS are available in Waters 120 and are 
due today. 

BLUE KEY SENIOR HONORARY member- 
ship applications are available In Anderson 122 
and are due by 4 p.m Feb. 6 

OPEN HOI 'SE SPECIAL EVENTS COMMIT- 
TEE: Any student or organization interested in 
performing as a special event for Open House 'ST 
can contact Katto Pstrcc at S»*>$] or the Col 
lege of Arts and Sciences office at 532-6900. 

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT 

CENTER will be snowing videotapes prepared 
by the College Placement Council in Holtz I07B 
"Interview Preparation" and "The Inlerview" 
will be shown at 3.30 p.m today, and "The Inter- 
view" and "Interview Follow -Up" will be shown 
at 1:30 p.m Tuesday. 

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT is 

now posting sign -up schedules for on -cam pus 
employment interviews by Kansas, regional and 
national employers All eligible candidates are 
urged to register and apply 



MORTAR BOARD applicationi are available in 
Union Activities Center and are due at S p.m. 

Feb.*. 



CONGRESSIONAL TEACHER SCHOLAR- 
SHIP PHOGRAM Information and applications 
forms available in Bluemont 017 

TODAY 

BUSINESS COUNCIL meets at 4 p m in Union 

209. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR 
DESIGNERS meet at 6:30 p m. in Union 207. 

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT ASSOCIA. 
TION meets at 7 30 p.m. in Justin Hoffman 

Lounge. 

ALPHA ZETA FRATERNITY meets at 6:30 
p.m at Valentino's back room 

PUBLIC RELATIONS STUDENT SOCIETY 
OF AMERICA meets at 7 p.m. in Kedzie Library 

ALPHA KAPPA PSI meets at B p m in Union 
107 

(HEW meets at 7 p.m in Union LilUe Theatre 

NATIONAL SOCIETY OF BLACK 
ENGINEERS meet al 6 p.m. In Durland 133 

NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR WOMEN 
meets al 7 p.m in Union 203 

ALPHA KAPPA PSI meets al 8 30 p.m in 
Charlie's Neighborhood Bar to discuss inlorma 
tional pledge/active smoker for juniors and 
seniors majoring in business or economics 

ECONOMICS CLUB meets at 7 p.m In Union 

m 

TUESDAY 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATORS BIBLE STUDY 

meets at 7 a.m. in Union Stateroom 3. 

GERMAN CLUB meets at 4 p.m. In Union 213. 




Gfc 



focxyxyorerarey^^ 



A PHI ALPHA THETA LECTURE 

"George Armstrong Custer 

and i he Battle ol the Litlle Big Hum." 

Delivered By 

Joyce Thierer 

An Lmplnycc i>l the CuMci Ndliuii.il Ikiiikiickl in 19X4 

Tuesday. January 27. 1987 Union 208. 3:30 p.m. 



i ■ 






Value 




! 



539-3830 



1127 Moro Aggieville 






^^nvppm 



KANSAS STATE COLLSOIAH, Monday , January 26, 1SS7 




Hayden seeks stable budget; 
Kansans may see more taxes 



Gov. Mike Hayden shakes hands with lawmakers Friday before delivering his 
state capitol. 

Employees to compete 
in revised competition 



Staff/Gary LyUe 
first State of the State address at the 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Re porter 

Recommendations made by Gov. 
Mike Hayden in his first State of the 
State address Friday in Topeka are a 
"major step forward" for K-State, 
University President Jon Wefald 
said Sunday. 

Hayden said his first priority is en- 
suring the state's finances are sound. 
To do that, he said, the state must 
hold off on his campaign promise of 
restoring to Kansans the $140 million 
it may receive as a refund due to 
federal tax reform. As a result, Kan- 
sans may be paying more state in- 
come taxes. 

While most programs on Hayden's 
budget received similar news of cuts 
or minimal budget increases, the six 
Kansas universities fared much bet- 
ter, Wefald said. 

One of Hayden's major recommen- 
dations affecting K-State was that of 
restoring the $3.06 million to the base 
budget, Wefald said. The $3.06 
million was K-State's share of the 3.8 
percent state-agency budget cuts 
mandated by Hayden Nov. 19, 1986. 

"We had to get that $3 million 
back," he said. "That was the 
number one thing we had to have." 

Hayden also recommended that all 
unclassified employees at the six 
universities be eligible for 2.5 per- 
cent salary increases. Though some 
university presidents expressed 
disappointment at the size of the 
salary increases for faculty, Wefald 
disagreed. 



"If you'll look at what revenues 
are available in the state of Kansas, I 
think that overall the recommenda- 
tions represent a major step for- 
ward," he said. 

Because "there isn't that much 
money the governor has to work 
with," Wefald said Hayden "made 
the best of a very meager situation. ' ' 

The Board of Regents had recom- 
mended an 8 percent increase in 
faculty salaries. Wefald said he 
agreed the faculty need an 8 percent 
salary increase. 

"We need 8 percent, there's no 
doubt about that," he said. "Our 
faculty, to remain competitive, need 
at least 8 percent this year and 8 per- 
cent next year. " 

That kind of money simply is not 
available, he said. If it was, Hayden 
and the key legislators would support 
"hefty increases for faculty 
salaries." 

Another of Hayden's education 
proposals would implement a finan- 
cial aid program aimed at cutting 
back on the "brain drain" of the 
state's top scholars, an issue that 
became the focus of legislators last 
year. 



By KRIST1 BARANCIK 
Collegian Reporter 



Nine finalists for the 1987 
Classified Employees of the Year 
have been selected from the 60 
employees nominated by University 
faculty and staff members last fall. 

In its 10th year, the program has 
been revised to include winners from 
three categories of employment 
rather than selecting one overall 
winner, said Joe Younger, program 
director and manager of staff train- 
ing and development. 

"Previously, we selected one 
employee of the year, but now we 
recognize people from their skills 
area so they are competing with 
their peers," Younger said. 

The three categories from which 
winners will be chosen are office and 
clerical, technical and professional, 
and service and skilled crafts. 

The three finalists selected in the 
office and clerical category are 
Dorothy Smith, Secretary III for the 
office of the vice president for educa- 
tional services with 14 years of ser- 
vice; Ronda Bokelman, Office Assis- 
tant IV for the physical facilities 
planning office with nine years of 
service; and Phyllis Mentgen, office 
supervisor in the controller's office 
with 27 years of service. 

Three finalists are also chosen 
from the technical and professional 



employee category: Shirley Olson, 
Administrative Officer II in the of- 
fice of the dean of arts and sciences 
with 21 years of service; James 
Leiker, agricultural technician at the 
Hays Branch Experiment Station 
with 26 years of service; Tim 
Lindemuth, Informational Writer II 
in the office of University Relations 
with 9 years of service. 

The third category includes three 
service and skilled crafts finalists: 
Donald Bruns, Specialist I in grounds 
maintenance with 21 years of ser- 
vice; Bernard Wells, Animal 
Caretaker III for the Department of 
Surgery and Medicine with 24 years 
of service; and Gladys Zlmmer, 
custodial worker in maintenance and 
utilities at the Veterinary Medical 
Center with seven years of service. 

The Classified Affairs Committee 
that selected the nine finalists will in- 
terview co-workers and colleagues of 
each nominee. The committee will 
use the interview information to 
select the three winners prior to the 
awards ceremony. 

Faculty response to the program 
has been excellent, Younger said. 

On March 25, University President 
Jon Wefald will announce the 1987 
Classified Employees of the Year 
during an All-University ceremony 
in McCain Auditorium. 




Kansas State University 

and 

Univ. of Calif .-Santa Barbara 

presents 

5 Actors From The 

London St 09a 

appearing for 

5 Exciting Days 



Pinter This Evening 

Readings Irani Harold Pinter's plays 

Thurs., January 29 
8 p.m.— Nichols Theatre 

S5 General -S3 SiutJent/Senior 



The Tempest 

by William Shakespeare 

January 30 & Janury 31 
8 p.m. McCain Auditorium 

SS General-14 Sludent/Senlor 



Free Public Events 

In arjrjiiion to te PINTER THIS EVENING and THE TEMPEST performances, there are the 
following happenings with one or more actors 

Jan. 27 

t1 30 Music and Dance in Elizabethan Theatre McCain 204 

11 30 Discussion, Pinter S THE DUMBWAITER Demson 220 

105 Comic Acting m THE TEMPEST Eisenhower 15 

SPECIAL EVENT' 
7 00 English Verse. American Verse.' Nichols Theatre 

Sarah Berger and Bruce Alexander will be reading trom the 
poelry ol John Milton and from poems of students in 
Advanced Poelry Workshop of Jonathan Holden 

Jan. 21 
9,30 Shakespeare's Characters, THE TEMPEST 
1:30 Acting Styles 



Elsenhower 226 

Purple Masque. 
Easl Stadium 103 



8 00 



1030 
1130 



400 



1200 




SPECIAL EVENT' 

W H Auden's The Sea and me Mirror, read by Trevor 
Baxter Sponsored by the Manhattan Civic Theatre. Auden's 
noetic commentaiy on characters of The Tempest 

Jan. 29 
SPECIAL EVENT" 

jack and the Pnesl." the love and religious poetry of John 
Donne, read by Bruce Alexander 
Directing Shakespeare 

Jan. 30 

SPECIAL EVENT! 

II Works Minimalist Staging & Theatrical Magic in THE 
TEMPEST Lecture by guest scholar Alan Dessen. 
University of North Carolina 

Jan. 31 
Problems in performing THE TEMPEST "The Lovers " KCH 
Humanities Seminar with Sarah Berger, Tom Mannion and 
revor Baxter 



Wareham Theatre 



Nichols Theatre 

Purple Masque, 
East Stadium 103 



Union 212 



Nichols 008 



For Tickets Call 

539-6398 

Mori Fri 12-5 p.m. 



Kansas 
1 Committee for the 
_ Humanities 





539-432 1 



Comedy Invasion 

Every Monday at 9 p.m. 

TONIGHT 
9 p.m. 

Dan Storts 

along with Susan Sparks 

531 N. Manhattan 



539-9727 



Show 
1987 

February 1 
at Manhattan Hofidome/ 

doors open at 1 :00 p.m. 



' drawings 



Sponsored by: 

Campbells 

Christines — The Wedding Company 

Crowells Card and Party Shop 

HighfielrJ Cottage The Palace 

Kansas State Travel 

Kistner s Flowers and Greenhouse 

Kitchen s Plus 

KQLAQ104 

Lady Finell Cosmetics and Color Analysis 

University Photography 

Vern s Donuts and Cakes 

Woody s Ladies Shop 



The proposal would forgive up to 
$4, 000 in loans for each year the reci- 
pient conies back to work in Kansas 
after graduating from a Regents 
university. 

In 1985, there were 77 National 
Merit Scholars in Kansas. K-State 
has signed about 49 National Merit 
Scholars for $2,000 scholarships for 
the fall of 1987. Wefald said. Of those 
49, 32 are "pretty well committed," 
which is twice the number of merit 
scholars as were here last fall. 

"We all want to do everything we 
can to keep the best and brightest 
(students) here In Kansas," he said. 

Another plus for K-State is 
Hayden's recommendation to 
change the enrollment corridor, 
which bases a university's budget on 
its enrollment from the previous two 
years, Wefald said. 

If the enrollment corridor is not 
changed, K-State would lose more 
than $1 million on July 1, 1987, 
Wefald said, due to enrollment 
declines of two years ago. If the 
Legislature adopts Hayden's reconv 
mendation, K- State would lose only 

See STATE, Page 12 



McCain T^ditorim 

,p P 
The Young 
Americans 






"Around the World 
in 80 Days" 

An All New Musical Revue 

Thursday, January 29, 1987 
8:00 p.m. 

Tickets and information 
(913)532-6428 
MasterCard/VISA accepted 





ELIGIBILITY FOR CARE 

AT 

LAFENE STUDENT 

HEALTH CENTER 



1 . Health fees are established upon the recommendation of the 
Student Senate with approval by the Board of Regents. 

2. All students who are enrolled and attending classes during a 
regular semester or summer session who have paid health fees 
are eligible for care. 

3. Those enrolled in Special Courses, for varying periods of time, 
who have made previous arrangements for health care 
coverage at Lafene are eligible for care. (Lists of these students 
must be furnished prior to being seen at Lafene) 

4. Only students, who have paid the health fee. may elect to have 
their spouse also covered at Lafene; however, they must pay 
the spouse fee within 10 days of the ttme their own health fees 
are paid. (Children cannot be seen.) 

5. Emergency care, prior to referral, will be given anyone who 
comes in. 

6. Students enrolled in 6 hours or less, electing not to pay the 
health fee during the Fall or Spring semesters, who wish to be 
seen, will be charged $20 for each office visit. This charge 
continues until the full health fee has been exceeded, then that 
student will be afforded the same privileges as the regular fee 
paying student for the remainder of that semester. 

7 Students who were enrolled in the Spring and pre-enrolled for 
the Fall semester but not attending summer school may pay $1 5 
and be eligible for care during the summer. This fee may be 
paid within 30 days prior to summer registration and ends the 
day classes begin. A late fee of $20 will be accepted for the 
remainder of the summer. 

8. Health fees are good until 12 o'clock the night the next semester 
begins. 



NOTE: In addition to the above mentioned fees, there are minimal 
charges for certain supplies and services and the charges 
are subject to change without prior notice. 

Advertisement 






A 



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Editorial 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, January 26, 1987 — 4 



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THE C l»I.l.K(.n^ 1 1 SI'S. imi.in is published by Sludmt Publications Inc . Kansas Slate University, daily except 


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Apartheid strips many 
of fundamental rights 



Imagine, for a moment, that 
you are a student living in and at- 
tending school in South Africa. 
You are black. Your weekend ac- 
tivities include staying alive 
while protesting a national cam- 
paign of discrimination directed 
at you. 

At school, you must either 
adhere to a dress code determin- 
ed by white school officials, 
which does not allow T-shirts of 
any kind, or you must risk 
suspension from school — 
possibly jail and certainly suspi- 
cion from authorities. 

Your behavior is constantly 
evaluated for signs of defiance, 
and authority figures keep tabs 
on the friends you keep and their 
activities. 

The system that allows these 
violations of your basic human 
rights is called apartheid — a 
word known worldwide which 
labels the injustice happening in 
South Africa. Yet after the first 
few stories about it appeared in 
newspapers and on television and 
the first action was taken on it by 
American legislators, there 
seems to have been an over- 



whelming surge of apathy. 

After the first wave of rage at 
the injustice in South Africa, 
apartheid appears to have 
become just another political 
system — something happening 
in another country which is sad, 
but unstoppable. And in the word 
"apartheid," the injustice is lost 
because we can call the system a 
name far removed from the na- 
tional campaign of discrimina- 
tion it is. 

By calling it apartheid, we can 
forget people are fighting against 
human indignity and a system of 
rule that says blacks are at the 
most second class citizens and 
often not believed to be worth 
consideration. 

We had our own system of 
apartheid not long ago. We called 
it slavery. If we, as Americans, 
forget about the people suffering 
because of the apartheid system, 
we are betraying our heritage 
and ourselves. We must not 
forget to look behind the labels 
and we must not allow our com- 
passion and rage to wither while 
others are denied rights we con- 
sider only right. 



Veto of Water Act bill 
will hurt Reagan, U.S. 



A showdown is brewing bet- 
ween the president and the new 
Congress, and the outcome could 
be an indicator of how the 
Reagan administration will fare 
its last two years with a 
Democratic-controlled Congress. 

The issue in question is the 
Clean Water Act. This legislation 
would provide $20 billion over a 
number of years to help clean up 
the nation's water supply. Under 
the terms of this bill, Kansas 
would receive $21.91 million the 
first year. 

This issue started last year 
when the old Congress 
unanimously passed the bill and 
sent it to the president for him to 
sign. President Reagan exercised 
a pocket veto by not signing it and 
allowing it to expire after Con- 
gress had adjourned for the ses- 
sion. Using the pocket veto also 
forced Congress to pass an entire- 
ly new bill. 

This new bill, identical to the 
old one, was passed by both 
houses last week, with a vote of 
93-6 in the Senate and 406-8 in the 
House. Reagan has threatened to 
veto this bill again, calling it a 
"budget-buster." This time, 
though, Congress will have a 
chance at a veto override, which 
Congressional leaders claim to 
have more than enough votes to 
obtain. 



President Reagan hasn't given 
the bill the priority it deserves. It 
is imperative the bill is passed in- 
to law, and Congressmen ob- 
viously believe otherwise. 

In fact, it is obvious that Con- 
gress thinks it's anything but a 
"budget-buster." Some people 
like to believe that clean water is 
more important than SDI or Con- 
tra aid. Human life cannot exist 
without clean water, and it 
arguably would be much better 
without Reagan's own "budget- 
busters." 

The president needs to think 
twice before vetoing this bill, for 
two reasons. First, he needs to 
fully comprehend the importance 
of the bill and consider the 
ramifications of it being rejected. 

Second, he needs to fully com- 
prehend the consequences of 
what a veto override would do to 
his effectiveness in office. If Con- 
gress puts him through the em- 
barrassment of a veto override, 
his presidency will be damaged 
even further. 

It is apparent the president no 
longer can push his policies off to 
a Congress willing to give carte 
blanche approval. His Teflon ar- 
mor has sustained too many 
chinks, and now Reagan must 
fight on the same level as the rest 
of the legislators on Capitol Hill. 




Iranscam may promote apathy 



The recent Iranscam affair seems destined 
to determine the course of history much like 
the Watergate scandal affected the '70s. 
Many of these effects are contingent upon ex- 
actly who is involved and the degree of that 
involvement. The worst scenario is that the 
President was fully informed of the entire 
operation. A more palatable scenario is that 
Oliver North was a special operations genius 
and only the National Security Council needs 
to be scrutinized 

And yet the power of the Fifth Amendment 
is making the process of uncovering all the 
retevant information difficult. Protecting 
people's rights never was meant to be effi- 
cient, just effective. So while the justice 
system moves on with no deadline, the 
legislative branch is under the deadline of 
November 1968, the next presidential elec- 
tion. The outcome of those elections might 
very well be determined in large part by this 
one event. 

Thus the scene is set, some might say, for 
the voters of this country to bury their heads 
in the sand of apathy. This prediction seems 
logical when you consider many voters still 
recall Watergate. Some historians believe 
Watergate was responsible for the end of stu- 
dent activism as it was known in the '60s. It 
had seemed many of these wounds were 
healed. Even student activism, though por- 
trayed as more conservative, has started to 
re-emerge on college campuses. It appears 
this scandal could prompt political apathy 
once again. Can such an occurrence be 
prevented? 

With all the proposed scenarios, it appears 
Ronald Reagan is in some part responsible 
for this entire incident. Whether intentional 
or through neglect, this incident occurred 
while he held the highest office. But, unless 
he is criminally involved, he will not have to 
answer to the public. However, his successor 
will have to prove he or she is above the 
manipulation or neglect that caused this 
situation. This successor should not be hand- 
ed the prize by a small apathetic electorate. 
It will be the determination of Reagan's suc- 
cessor who could prevent a distrust of 
government and the ensuing apathy. 




PATRICK 
MUIR 

Collegian 
Columnist 



This optimism lies in the understanding 
that the Watergate Scandal and this Iranian 
Scandal are fundamentally different. 
1 Watergate was perceived as occurring 
because of professional politicians overstep- 
ping the bounds of the law. Therefore, the 
fast-thinking reactionary voters gave the 
people the least professional politician of our 
age, Jimmy Carter. The party that 
nominated Carter gave the people what they 
were asking for 

The Iranian Scandal is being perceived, in 
either of the scenarios, as Reagan and his 
chosen advisers not understanding foreign 
affairs. If they did break any laws, it was 
because their ignorance precipitated such 
arrogance. And therefore the electorate, if it 
examines the situation in its reactionary 
manner, will look for the next president to be 
not only a communicator but also a debater. 

Such a candidate will need to prove during 
the course of the campaign that he or she 
does possess a complete understanding of not 
only foreign policy but also domestic and 
economic policy. It will not suffice to only 
know the best advisers. The press and the 
parties will be forced to allow such a forum if 
they realize the electorate demands it. 

The media have a preoccupation with the 
candidates' style over the understanding of 
issues. In a study of the 1976 presidential 
election by J.R. McClellan, it was found "by 
a ratio of more than four to one, both print 
and broadcast media stressed the personali- 
ty and campaign events over issue discus- 
sion." ft should be noted that Watergate did 
magnify the desire of the public to know the 
personality of their next president. But the 
proportion of such news demonstrates the 



press's influence. By centering on personali- 
ty it becomes apparent how "such choices 
become plausible." 

The situation Reagan finds himself in to- 
day can force this country to do some 
massive rethinking. The electorate should 
not tolerate another Madison Avenue 
TelePrompTer addict. This scandal has 
already prompted such a realization. The 
"great communicator" is having a hard time 
getting the story to be believed. And George 
Bush, the party heir-apparent, is drastically 
slipping in the polls for the Republican 
nomination The stage is set for the 
emergence of the Reagan antithesis in both 
parties. 

If the press has made our choices seem 
plausible in the past, then the Iran Scandal 
can make choices such as Sen. Bob Dole, 
R-Kan., and Sen. Sam Nunn. D-Ga , plausi- 
ble in 1968. Both types of men were too pro- 
fessional for the mood of 1976; Dole knows 
this all too well. And both men are almost too 
intelligent to be nominated under the peren- 
nial political climate. But Dole and Nunn are 
of the caliber to lead the United States after 
this crisis. Their Senate experience has prov- 
ed they are fully prepared to deal with 
foreign, domestic and economic policy. One 
cannot imagine Dole would desire an Oliver 
North in his administration. At the same 
time, it is difficult to think of Nunn as being 
pacified by not being fully aware of what his 
operatives are doing in Iran. 

This country believed Reagan and his 
patriotic theme was a good prescription after 
Carter. We watched with interest, not con- 
tempt, as he "communicated" through press 
conference after press conference. Reagan 
does have noble goals and he is a great com- 
municator. But in the capacity as president, 
that is not enough. If we didn't realize it 
before now, we can before the next election. 
So to those who feel discouraged as they 
watch this scandal unfold, remember there 
is a way to deal with it and it is not apathy. 
This next election has the potential for the 
electorate to position itself so that it can 
make a real choice between individuals of 
presidential and intellectual caliber 



Letters 



Enough is enough 

Editor, 

Since the Roe vs. Wade decision, a lot of 
opinions about the abortion issue have been 
generated. Well, I've done some thinking on 
it as well. I think abortion should be a federal 
law, not preventing but requiring it. Con- 
sidering the population explosion being ex- 
perienced in many impoverished nations, 
this law becomes quite reasonable. Why 
create children domestically when there are 
plenty worldwide to go around? 

If every childless woman in this country 
were to adopt or sponsor a less fortunate 
child from one of these nations, we could 
wipe out world poverty altogether. OK, so 
you're offended by my demented opinions. 
Well, I'm sorry. I really don't mean it 
anyway. 

I'm just very, very tired of the abortion 
issue. Members of both sides have been 
screaming at each other for 14 years. Since 
then, they have not been able to consolidate 
their ideas into a constructive solution 

In this day and age, the world is being fac- 
ed with many more serious problems, such 
as war, terrorism, world starvation, dwindl- 
ing resources and disease When you think 
about the magnitude of these international 
problems, the abortion issue becomes quite 
trivial. Get your priorities straight! 

My plea to the concerned students of 
K State is this; Either work together and find 



a real and tangible solution to the problem, 
or drop it. Stop using the Collegian as a 
pulpit. 

Randy (rain 
senior in electrical engineering 

'Yes' to salary cuts 

Editor, 

Economic woe is a startling reality that the 
state of Kansas is being forced to face. As a 
whole, Kansas is looking at a huge cut of $60 
million. As individuals, all Kansans are look- 
ing at cuts that will affect their lives. 

Individual responsibility will be an impor- 
tant part of the struggle that Kansas has 
begun to restore economic stability The 3.8 
percent salary cuts for the presidents of the 
Regent-run state universities are such a 
responsible step. 

The Collegian editorial of Jan. 20, "Kansas 
won't benefit by regent-imposed cut," would 
argue differently. It called the action 
"asinine," as if denying the troubles that ex- 
ist in this state. Monies must be cut where it 
is feasible to do so. Is there an argument to 
be made that presidential salaries are not 
such a place? I don't believe so. 

There is no doubt that the presidential 
cuts, which would save the state nearly 
$11,000, amount to litUe more than a sym- 
bolic gesture; indeed, they are .014 percent 
of the $60 million action of the state 
legislature. Vet does their size make them 



any less of a correct step? If the editorial 
board does not think the cuts amount to 
much, perhaps they would suggest larger 
cute? 

An increase of such "measly" <to use the 
editorial's description of the regents action) 
cuts would, perhaps, break the spirits and 
lower the morale of the university 
presidents. Consequently, they would quit 
their positions as chiefs of the educational 
foundations of Kansas because of pay cuts. 
Or. perhaps they would responsibly accept 
the individual measures, which thousands of 
other Kansans are similarly facing. For- 
tunately, the latter would seem to be the 
case, as indicated by President Wefald's 
response to the matter. 

Indeed, the reactions of people across this 
state will determine the condition in which 
Kansas will come out of its economic battle. 
The Collegian editorial speaks of the "brain 
drain" which is occurring in Kansas today 
Many people, a majority of whom are college 
graduates, leave this state to pursue a career 
or money. 

That is one's own decision, of course, but I 
believe that individuals who care about the 
state of Kansas would choose to remain here 
when given a choice. In such a time of 
despair as exists today, this state deserves 
even more so to have the talents and con- 
tributions of its people working for it. 

Tom Hoisington 

freshman in electrical engineering 

and mathematics 



M 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, January 26, 1987 — 5 



Senate dependent on students Letters 



Are you someone who wonders if Student 
Senate really does anything! Well, contrary 
to popular belief, it is more than a resume 
builder. Student Senate has addressed many 
issues that directly affect the student body, 
and it has had the foresight to approach 
issues of concern at K-State. 

— Senate is currently examining the issue 
of the administrative charge to be levied on 
seven auxiliary and local fund agencies. 
Three of these are, for the most part, 
student -funded organizations: the Union, 
Lafene Student Health Center and Student 
Publications Inc. Because all students sub- 
sidize these groups, student leaders are con- 
cerned about the effect this charge will have 
on student fees in the future. 

— During the spring semester, the Finance 
Committee spent a considerable amount of 
time allocating nearly $800,000 in student 
fees to campus groups. 

— Thursday, Senate will hear a report 
from the Athletic Fee Task Force. One 
recommendation will be to levy a support fee 
from students for scholarships to non- 
revenue sports. If the athletic fee is passed in 
Senate, students will have the opportunity to 
vote on it during the Feb. 10-11 elections. 

If you have an opinion or concern, or even 
want to know more about the details of any 
campus issue, call the Senate Hot Line 
(532-7777) and speak to one of your senators. 

— The Hot Line is one of the tools that we 
hope will create better communication bet- 
ween students and Senate. Senate Com- 
munications Committee also utilized visita- 
tions, newsletters and SGA Week to make it 
as easy as possible for students to be aware 
of the issues. 

— To prevent another Aggie ville distur- 
bance. Senate worked with city and Universi- 
ty officials to reach a workable solution for 
the future. Senate also wrote a letter to the 
editor which made its way into many Kansas 
newspapers, in an effort to clear the name of 
K-State students who took the brunt of the 
negative publicity. 

— This Senate has also focused on recruit- 
ment efforts at the University. In the final 
weeks of this term, we will be sending a per- 





CANDY 
LEONARD 

Guest 

Columnist 



sonal letter to almost 2,500 prospective high 
school students who indicated an interest in 
student government on the ACT. We feel this 
is a target audience that we could influence. 

— Through the Student Affairs and Social 
Services Committee, we addressed the need 
for a crosswalk at the corner of Denison 
Avenue and College Heights Road. Brett 
Bromich's committee spent one day last fall 
doing its own count of pedestrians and 
vehicles. Their efforts prompted city of- 
ficials to conduct a survey. Reports indicate 
that three of the nine qualifications for a 
crosswalk are met, and the crosswalk has 
been added to long-range capital improve- 
ment plans. 

— Early in the term. Senate passed a 
resolution in opposition to the financial aid 
cuts in Gramm-Rudman-Hollings and for- 
warded it to our federal legislators. With the 
help of Associated Students of Kansas, our 
lobbying efforts have far-reaching effects in 
Washington and Topeka. 

— The Senate Operations Committee met 
its goal of modifying the SGA Constitution 
and By-laws, allowing Senate to operate 
more effectively. 

— Senate spent several weeks in review of 
the Representation Enhancement Referen- 
dum. Though it's difficult for any group to 
review itself, I personally wanted to see this 
examined further because of the long-term 
effects of better representation. 

— More than half of the senators sit on 
University committees outside of Senate, in- 
cluding the Council on Religion, Basketball 
Ticket Sales, Utilization of Long-term Park- 
ing, Convocations and search committees. 

So, we as student senators do attempt to 



make a difference at K-State. Senate rela- 
tions established with University and com- 
munity leaders ensure cooperation and that 
students' opinions will be recognized. 

It is vital that this tradition continues. And 
the only way is for interested students to 
serve on the next Student Senate Tomorrow 
is the deadline to file for election. I urge you 
to pick up a filing form, available in the SGS 
office in the Union. It is simply a statement 
of your intention to run, and it should be turn- 
ed in to the Dean of Student's office in Holton 
Hall 102. 

Elections for Student Senate (49 seats), 
Student Body President and Board of Student 
Publications (4 positions) are Feb. 10-11. 

As a senator, you are required to attend 
Senate meetings held Thursday nights at 7 
(yes, you miss "The Cosby Show "> in the 
Union Big Eight Room. Other respon- 
sibilities are working with a standing com- 
mittee and serving one office hour each 
week. This allows for someone to always be 
available to walk-in students and to answer 
the SGA Hot Line. 

So, this is your last chance. Not for fame 
and fortune — but to make a difference at 
this University, working for student's rights. 

Cindy LwnanJ 1* ■ Junior in hnntt economics and man 
comrounlratlwt* and hi chairwoman of IV Senal* Com- 

■nuntratkwii I nmmlilrt-. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

pertaining to matters of public interest 
are encouraged. All letters must be 
typewritten or neatly printed and 
signed by the author and should not 
exceed 300 words The author's major, 
classification or other identification 
and a telephone number where the 
author can be reached during business 
hours must be included. The Collegian 
reserves the right to edit letters 

Letters may be brought to Kedzie 116 
or mailed to the Collegian Editorial 
Page Editor. Kedzie 103, Kansas State 
University, Manhattan, Kan. 66506. 



Beginning of life 

Editor, 

When does life begin? "The majority of our 
group could find no point in time between the 
union of sperm and egg, or at least the 
blastocyst stage, and the birth of the infant at 
which point we could say that this was not a 
human." From the first International Con- 
ference held in Washington, D.C., in October 

1967. 

The conference had gathered the most 
distinguished scientific meeting in recent 
years that considered this question. The 
group was composed of biochemists, pro- 
fessors of obstetrics and gynecology, 
geneticists, etc. 

This is my two cents on the topic of abor- 
tion which the Collegian has been printing. I 
think this is great that people get out in the 
open and talk on the issue and don't push it 
under the rug. People need to shed their feel- 
ings on the issue until it is settled and abor- 
tion is abolished. 

The comments made by the Mark Houston 
proved how uninformed and how mislead he 
is. First of all, referring to the baby as an un- 
wanted growth, like a tumor, cyst or wart, is 
a very immature statement. He has no proof 
that any of these growths biologically can 
become a human body at birth. 

I've heard the fetus called a blob of flesh, a 
type of cancer. What's this? Does the woman 
have a cancer for nine months and it's gone 
all because she had intercourse? Ha! 

Second, there is no proof that the fetus is 
not a human. Read up buddy, read the facts. 
Can a wart can feel pain, taste, suck its 
thumb and have a heartbeat eight weeks 
after conception? I didn't know a wart had a 
heartbeat. I'll remember not to use Com- 
pound W on my next wart. 

Also, they can tell what sex a baby is with a 
sonogram. I also didn't know that a tumor 
had a sexual identity. 

Third, women do have a right over their 
body but not over another human life! The 
courts have given them the right, without the 



babies' permission, to kill them off. Sort of 
like the Jews in Germany during World War 
II. 

If we don't stand up to this, who will? And 
how many more future doctors, policemen, 
football stars and friends will be killed? 

Matt Wasko 
sophomore in physical education 

Great double irony 

Editor. 

What a couple of great examples of irony 
we have been presented with in the past few 
weeks. First, we have the Manhattan City 
Commission, which met to discuss methods 
of promoting the city of Manhattan as a place 
that is ideal for businesses to locate, yet it 
was held in Kansas City. (Isn't Manhattan 
the proper place to hold such a meeting? ) 

Then, during the time when so many 
celebrations are being held in honor of the 
Rev. Martin Luther King Jr and his ideals, 
K-State sees fit to cancel not just one, but two 
English literature courses that were devoted 
to the study of literature by minority 
authors. 

While I can offer no explanation for the ac- 
tion taken by the Manhattan City Commis- 
sion, K-State has financial problems as the 
reason for its action. It is understood that 
this monetary crisis is causing a great deal 
of strain on an already barebones budget, but 
there seems to be a loss of priorities in those 
individuals who make the decisions on which 
classes are to be cut. 

It's a sorry commentary on the part of the 
school administration when upper level 
literature courses are cut and yet the system 
finds the money for classes such as bowling, 
volleyball, aerobics and other such classes. 
Apparently, these classes are considered to 
be more important to the overall develop- 
ment of the student. 

Redgy Nail 
senior in education 



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KANSAS STATS COLLEGIAN, Monday, 



26, 1SS7 



Official says campuses test religious freedom 



By CHAD L. SANBORN 
Staff Writer 

Religious freedoms at state 
universities are constantly being 
tested, said Charles Reagan, assis- 
tant to the president, at a potluck 
dinner Sunday. 

The dinner, sponsored by the 
KSU Committee on Religion, was 
held at the International Student 
Center and concluded a weeklong 
observance of the death of civil 
rights leader Martin Luther King 
Jr. 

Comprising representatives of 
various religions, including Chris- 
tianity, Islam, Judaism and Baha'i. 
the committee works to maintain 
religious freedom on campus and to 



keep communication open between 
different religions, said Don Fallon, 
coordinator of religious activities. 

The balance of religious 
freedoms on campus with the laws 
and requirements imposed on state 
institutions is constantly tested, 
Reagan said. 

"But it is not easy to decide what 
is permissible and what is not," he 
said. 

For example, Reagan said the 
University allows religious groups 
to meet in campus buildings, 
whether the meeting is a discussion 
or a worship service. 

But there are limits on religious 
freedom. K-State does not allow 
door-to-door soliciting of religious 
material in the residence halls, he 



said. 

In addition to speaking, Reagan 
answered questions about issues 
concerning religious freedoms on 
campus 

One question raised dealt with a 
student's right to refuse to answer 
test questions contrary to his 
beliefs. Reagan said the question 
confused learning with believing. 

"You may think Freud's theories 
on sexual developement are off the 
wall. But the professor is not asking 
you if you believe them or not," he 
said. "He is only concerned as to 
whether or not you know them." 
Reagan said. "Furthermore, going 
to a university is a way of life, not 
just some place you go for a couple 
hours a day. It would be absurd to 



eliminate the presence of various 
religious groups on campus." 

However, Reagan said it is possi- 
ble to bar from campus religious 
groups which take advantage of the 
University's "liberal rules." 

The majority of these are cults, 
he said. A cult is defined by the pro- 
cesses by which the group recruits 
people and to what they subject 
members. 

Even though the issues can 
become tense, Reagan said that 
isn't completely bad. 

"To accomplish a balance bet- 
ween religion in the public sector 
and religion in the private sector, 
you have to have tension," he said. 
"If the balance is to be maintained, 
the tension can't be removed." 



Search process begins 
for Stamey's successor 



Race for student body president begins 



By JULIE REYNOLDS 

Business/Government Editor and 

CHRIS HALL 

Collegian Reporter 

The race has begun — two students 
filed for the position of student body 
president Friday. 

Getting freshmen and off-campus 
students more involved in student 
government is one of the goals 
Michelle Benoit, junior in 
agricultural economics, hopes to ac- 
complish if she is elected student 
body president. 

Benoit announced her candidacy 
for the office at a press conference at 
3:30 p.m. Friday. 

Benoit, who is a student senator, 
said she believes the student body 
should get away from "the idea of 
just electing a person for the position 
and start thinking of it in terms of 
electing a set of ideas and 
philosophies that would be put into 
effect to best serve the University." 
"As far as my ideas and 
philosophies are concerned, I think it 
is very important to get as many peo- 
ple as we possibly can involved with 
different campus activities — to get 
more students to really feel a part of 
the University," she said. 

Developing a Freshman Student 
Council to get freshmen involved in 
student government and getting the 
Off -Campus Council active again are 
two ways she plans to accomplish 
this. 

Benoit would also like to have a 
section in the Collegian once a week 
devoted to what is going on in student 
government. 

The section would tell what the 
issues are and explain them. The ar- 
ticle would be written by the student 
body president or Student Senate 
chairman. 



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If possible, Benoit would also like 
to have a half-hour program once a 
week on KSDB-FM to explain the 
issues. Students would be encourag- 
ed to call in with questions they 
might have. 

Restructuring the cabinet of the 
student body president is another 
thing Benoit would do if elected. She 
hopes to more fully utilize the people 
in these positions by appointing 
liaisons between herself and the ad- 
ministration, student government, 
the Manhattan community and other 
areas. 

"Through my interaction with a lot 
of students from a number of dif- 
ferent living groups and colleges, I 
have seen the importance of getting 
everyone involved, for these are the 
individuals that will take on a feeling 
of ownership toward K-State. 

"These are also the people that will 
stay enrolled at our university and 
they are also the ones that will pro- 
mote K-State," Benoit said. "This is 
of great consequence when consider- 
ing the fact that our university has 
lost more than $8 million during the 
past few years simply because of our 
declining enrollment. 

"The more individuals we can get 



with the feeling of ownership about 
K-State, the more our programs will 
be improved, the more our universi- 
ty will be enhanced, but most impor- 
tantly, the more weight our degrees 
will hold in the business world," she 
said. "That is important to me and 
I'm sure it is important to every stu- 
dent enrolled at Kansas State." 

Brett Bromich, senior in 
marketing, also filed for student 
body president on Friday. 

Bromich, a member of Student 
Senate for three years, said Student 
Senate has been given the privilege 
of allocating money as a courtesy 
given by the University president. 

"I would like to see this courtesy 



made into a contract so that the 
students have a permanent voice in 
how the money is allocated," he said. 

As far as changes go, Bromich said 
he wants the contract to be made giv- 
ing the Student Senate the legal right 
to allocate money. He would also like 
to see the individual college councils 
work together when allocating 
money. 

Currently, each individual college 
council allocates money in different 
ways, and Bromich said he would 
like to see this made uniform. 

Bromich said he would also like to 
see the image of K-State as an 
academic institute improved. 



By Th e Collegian Staff 

University Provost Owen Koeppe 
announced Thursday the 12 
members who have been selected to 
the search committee that will find a 
new dean for the College of Arts and 
Sciences, 

The committee will choose a 
replacement for Dean William L. 
Stamey. who is retiring after 18 
years at K-State. 

Nine of the 12 members are from 
the College of Arts and Sciences. The 
remaining three members come 
from the dean's office, the graduate 
school and the Department of 
Agronomy, 

A graduate student and an 
undergraduate student will be nam- 
ed to the committee early next week 
to fill two remaining positions. 

The committee will have its first 
meeting today at 3:30 p.m. 

The committee will be soliciting 
applications for the soon-to-be- 
vacated position as soon as possible, 
Koeppe said. 

"We hope we can complete the pro- 
cess by the end of the semester," 
Koeppe said. 



The committee consists of the 
following members: Burton Kauf- 
man, professor of history and com- 
mittee chairman; Bettie Dale, 
academic adviser in the dean's of- 
fice; George Ham, head of the 
agronomy department; Terry 
Johnson, professor and director of 
the Division of Biology; Robert 
Kruh, dean of the graduate school 
and associate provost; Aruna 
Michie, associate professor of 
political science and director of the 
South Asian Center; Wayne Naf- 
ziger, professor of economics ; Carol 
Oukrop, head of the Department of 
Journalism and Mass Communica- 
tions; Donald Setser, professor of 
chemistry; Robin Smith, professor 
of philosophy; Mary Ellen Sutton, 
associate professor of music; and 
Elizabeth Unger, professor of com- 
puter science. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday,. J lajuiaryJtVIM^ 



K-State orchestra performs at gala 



400 dancers enjoy 
big-band varieties 
at musical benefit 

By The Collegian Staff 

The K-State Union Ballroom was 
alive with music Friday as nearly 400 
people donned formal attire for an 
evening of dancing with the Kansas 
State Orchestra. 

Dance Gala II featured a wide 
variety of selections ranging from 
Strauss to contemporary rock. 

Tables decorated with pine cone 
centerpieces and candles surrounded 
the dance floor. Streamers and ban- 
ners encircled the ballroom, and the 
orchestra stand was decorated by a 
variety of greenery. 

"The Dance Gala went terrific, it 
was a big success," said Adrian 
Bryttan. orchestra conductor. The 
performance emphasized a variety 
of music styles, including polkas and 
'50s tunes, in an effort to attract a 
crowd of all ages, he said. 

"We tried to play something for 
everyone," Bryttan said, "People 
enjoy going to events with a big band 
sound." 

This year the orchestra has 
broadened musical selections 
beyond the usual classical ar- 
rangements to include contemporary 
tunes and Frank Sinatra songs. 

Sponsored by Golden Key National 
Honor Society, Dance Gala II is the 
only fund-raiser for the orchestra. 
Many previous orchestra perfor- 
mances were benefits or free public 
appearances. 

Orchestra members include music 
and non-music majors, qualified 
high school musicians and members 
of the Manhattan community. 



a Vk^YiVi V»>3>>V% 



Jack Nite 

H.75 




SUft /Brad Fanitner 
Kathleen Adams and Jess Cunnick dance to the music of the Kansas State Or- 
chestra Friday in the Union Ballroom. 



The orchestra was recently asked 
to perform a concert to precede Gov. 
Mike Hayden's inaugural ball. 

Bryttan said credit for the gala's 
success should go to the members 
who organized and put up most of the 



decorations, setting the event into 
motion. 

"The orchestra works hard to 
prepare for a different program the 
whole year, the credit goes to the 
students," he said. 



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STAR & TIMES 

STUDENT 
SPECIAL 

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only $20.80 

Mail this coupon with payment to: 

K.C. Star 

Student Publications 
Kedzie Hall 103 
Manhattan, KS 66506 
(913) 532-6555 

Delivery will begin upon receipt of payment. 




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I agree to subscribe to The Kansas City Star anil 
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(2080 This price Includes consideration tar 
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Travel provides fun, credit 



By TIM STALE Y 
Co llegian Reporter 

Students who traveled to 
England over Christmas break 
were able to receive class credit 
for a European vacation. 

Although Dwayne Lively, 
sophomore in English, traveled to 
England for class credit, it was not 
his only reason. 

"I'm getting the credit because 
it's available now, but it was a 
vacation, just a fun trip," Lively 
said. 

Lively was one of 36 participants 
in "Topics in English: Literary 
Britain," a two-credit hour in- 
tercession class held in London 
from Dec. 27 to Jan. 11. 

The class was offered through 
the Department of English and in- 
cluded some members from the 
Department of Art. 

Ben Nyberg, associate professor 
of English and co-coordinator of 
the trip, said seven students took 
the class for English credit, while 
the remaining participants took 
the trip as a vacation. 

Nyberg said the group followed a 
tight schedule, visiting several 
theaters, museums and famous 
British sites. 

The group visited Westminster 
Abbey, the British Museum and 



the National Gallery. The students 
saw performances of "MacBeth" 
and "Les Miserables," which 
played to sold-out crowds at the 
National Theater in London. The 
casts included Vanessa Redgrave, 
Anthony Hopkins and Derek 
Jacobi, a famous British actor. 

Nyberg described London as 
"the culturally rich center of Bri- 
tain." He said he told the students 
to see everything they could see 
while they were in London, and 
sleep when they returned home. 

London "really is the hub of 
things," said Ludwig Villasi. assis 
tant professor of clothing textiles 
and interior design. 

"London is my favorite," Villasi 
said. "If I ever have a chance to 
retire or be independently wealthy 
where I live, it would be London." 

While the group spent most of its 
time in London, the trip also in- 
cluded a three-day excursion to 
Bath, a city about 24 hours from 
London. 

"I enjoyed the three days at 
Bath," Lively said. 

"(Bath) had a different 
character to it. It was more of what 
you picture England as," he said. 

Although the course was planned 
by Nyberg and Gary Clift, instruc- 
tor in English, art students and 
Diane Dollar, instructor in art, ac- 



companied the group on the trip. 

Dollar said the three art students 
who went on the trip had already 
graduated and took the trip as a 
vacation. 

She said the British museum in 
London has many antiques, and 
"that's a real source of art ex- 
perience that you can't see 
anywhere else. Actually, all of the 
galleries have things you can't see 
any place else. 

"I think (the students) really 
have the opportunity to see 
something they can't get in class," 
Dollar said. She said the students 
also had the chance to find out 
firsthand that what they were 
taught in school actually is true. 

"You can read (about art) in the 
books, but it doesn't carry half the 
impact of being able to see the 
(original)," she said. 

"You have to have a premiere 
artistic experience to really 
understand what art is and how 
significant art can be," she said. 
"The kids were impressed. They 
were delighted to have the oppor- 
tunity to see this and know that 
nobody lied to them when they 
were in class," 

If he goes back to England, 
Nyberg said, "I'll go to London 
first, because that's where the 
plane lands." 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, January 26, 1987 — 8 



'Cats lose Big 8 game 'Sooner' than expected 



By DAVE WAGNER 
Sports Writer 

It seemed like no matter what the Wildcats 
tried to do Saturday, it just wasn't their day 
and a victory was not meant to be. 

K-State was handed its first conference 
loss in a telltale Big Eight Conference match- 
up against the nationally ranked Oklahoma 
Sooners in Ahearn Field House. 

The Sooners, now 14-3 overall and 4-1 in 
conference play, downed the Wildcats, 13-4 
and 3-1, 81-78 in a nailbiting contest. 

"We had a rough time keeping them from 
scoring," said K-State head coach Lon 
Kruger, "McCalister answered every time 
he needed to.. .we were pretty much effective 
offensively as far as getting the shots that we 
wanted, (but) we got some tough rolls that 
didn't go down." 

"It was an excellent ball game," said 
Oklahoma mentor Billy Tubbs. "We knew 
they had a good ball team coming in and that 
they could shoot the ball well, but we were 
just hoping to take them out of their bali 
game." And that they did. 

Led by 6-foot-3 senior guard Tim Mc- 
Calister, Oklahoma's top scorer with 34 
points, the Sooners controlled the tempo 
throughout the ball game. William Scott and 
Norris Coleman shared K-State 's top scoring 
honors with 24 points each. 

In the early going of the ball game, K-State 
found itself down by six points as the Sooners 
jumped out to an 8-2 lead with IB: 15 left in the 
half. It wasn't until Scott, the Wildcats' out- 
side shooting ace, received his wakeup call 
with 17:18 to go that the 'Cats were able to 
get back into the game. 

It was the hot hand of Scott, who hit four of 
four from three-point range and finished the 
half with 20 points, that kept K-State alive. 

It was Scott's three-point shot that tied the 
game at 16-16 with 12:27 left in the period 
From then on, it was a seesaw battle as the 
half ended with the Sooners leading by three. 
39-36. 

K-State's Coleman and Mitch Richmond 
were kept quiet in the half, with Coleman on- 
ly scoring six points and Richmond four. 
Richmond also collected three fouls and 
spent much of the latter part of the first half 
on the bench. 

"(Richmond and Coleman were) rushing 
just a touch... I think that we were a little 
sped up the first half," Kruger said. 

The 'Cats came out flat in the second half, 
which allowed Oklahoma to build a lo-point 
lead midway through the period. K-State. 
which has been praised this season for being 
a team that fights off comebacks, suddenly 
found the tables turned as it fought to regain 
lost ground. 

"We were looking up with 10 minutes left in 
the ball game and really wondering how we 
were still in it," Kruger said. "We really got 
outhustled and yet we were still there with a 
chance." 

It was two consecutive slam dunks by Col- 
eman with a little more than five minutes left 
which got K-State and the capacity crowd of 
11,220 back into the game. 

Coleman's hook shot and Charles Bledsoe's 
bucket from underneath brought K-State to 
within one, 79-78, with 1:09 left to play. 

It was to no avail, though, as Oklahoma 
collected two points from the charity stripe 
off a Mitch Richmond foul. This gave the 
'Cats the ball with 16 seconds to play and 
nothing but the three-point shot on their 
mind. 

Kruger's strategy was plain and simple. 

"We wanted to give Will a shot," Kruger 
said. "We picked for him twice and they swit- 
ched on to him both times." 

K-State leads Bi% Eight at 4-1 




University of Oklahoma forward David Johnson lands on top of K-State guard Steve Henson as 
they scramble for a loose ball during the second half of the Big Eight Conference game Satur- 



Staff/John Thelander 



day In Ahearn Field House. The Hth-ranked Sooners defeated the Wildcats HI-7H before a 
sellout crowd. 



Oklahoma read the strategy well and 
followed Scott all the way. Scott, the second- 
best three-point shooter in the nation, was 
able to get a shot off from beyond the 19-foot- 
9-inch stripe under heavy contention and off 
his heel, but it didn't fall. 



OKLAHOMA 


MIN 


FG 


MM 


FT 


R 


F 


TJ* 


GRANT 


37 


6-12 


<M! 


04 


6 


2 


12 


KENNEDY 


40 


4-9 


0-0 


3-4 


1 


4 


11 


JOHNSON 


37 


3-12 


04 


74 


9 


4 


.»■ 


GRACE 


20 


1-4 


0-0 


2-2 


3 


i 


4 


McCALISTER 


40 


1222 


2-7 


64 


& 


1 


34 


Sieger 


25 


34 


1-4 


0-0 


4 


1 


7 


Watson 


1 


IMP 


0-0 


94 





1 





Tola Ik 




IMS 


3-11 


26-21 


36 


15 


61 


K-STATE 


MIN 


fo 


FG-3 


FT 


R 


F 


TP 


RICHMOND 


21 


5- is 


0-6 


34 


3 


5 


13 


COLEMAN 


38 


10-23 


04 


4-4 


14 





24 


BLEDSOE 


23 


3-6 


0-0 


0-2 


6 


3 


6 


HENSON 


36 


3-6 


0-0 


0-2 


6 


3 


6 


SCOTT 


36 


9-12 


4-6 


2-2 


3 


3 


24 


Dobbins 


16 


3-6 


0-1 


04 


3 





6 


Meyer 


IS 


1-1 


04 


04 


4 


4 


2 


Simmons 


It 


»1 


0-0 


04 











Nelson 


4 


0-0 


04 


04 








, 


Totals 




32-TI 


S-1S 


Ml 


16 


IS 


78 



Halftime score Oklahoma 36. K-Stale 3ft 
Turnovers: Oklahoma 12, K Slate 12 
Field goal percentage- Oklahoma 44.6. K-State 4S 1 
Attendance: 11.220 



Henson's disappointment after OU game 
proves losses are harder for competitors 



By JENNY CHAULK 
Sports Writer 



Saturday's game between K-State and 
Oklahoma had it all. 

Oklahoma, ranked ninth by United Press 
International and 11th by The Associated 
Press, took on the Big Eight Conference- 
leading Wildcats in front of a capacity 
crowd at Ahearn Field House. And for 
those who were unable to purchase tickets, 
television coverage was provided by 
Ray com Sports Network. 

The stage was definitely set for a great 
performance and a Wildcat win. 

Instead, a last-second, three-point shot 



by Will Scott that would have tied the 
game bounced off the rim, and the 'Cats 
were handed their first conference loss in 
four outings, 81-78. 

Perhaps no one was more disappointed 
from the loss than K-State guard Steve 
Henson. If "dejection" had an illustration 
besides its definition in the dictionary, 
Henson's face after the game would be 
perfect. 

Henson played 36 minutes, dished out 
nine assists and made two steals. He came 
out of nowhere with 7:30 left in the first 
half to block Ricky Grace's layup attempt. 

However, he scored only three points, 
six below his conference average of nine. 



Down by one with 18 seconds left in the 
game, he was charged with a turnover. Of- 
ficials said Henson was the last to touch 
the ball which rolled out-of-bounds in front 
of Oklahoma's bench. 

"I did hit the ball, but I'm not real sure if 
anyone hit it after me," Henson said. 

Henson has become the Wildcats' 
quarterback on the court. Some might say 
it's a great accomplishment for a 
freshman from McPherson. Some might 
even say losing to a nationally ranked 
team with great individual players like 
Tim McCalister and Darryl Kennedy 

See HENSON, Page 9 



Lady Cats win overtime thriller against rival Kansas, 71-65 




By DARAN NEUSCHAFER 
Sports Writer 



Staff, Thru Stewart 

K-State guard Janet Madsen hugs forward TTacey Bleczinski following the Lady 'Cat* 71-65 
overtime victory over the Kansas Jayhawks. Bleczinski sank two free throws to send the 
game into overtime, where she scored five of her 16 points. 



K-State's women's basketball team has 
made a habit of falling behind early in its 
games this season. It's a habit that K-State 
head coach Matilda Mossman would like to 
break. 

But the Lady Cats also have another habit 
that Coach Matilda Mossman finds a little 
easier to live with — their recent habit of 
winning. 

Against cross-state rival Kansas Saturday 
in Ahearn Field House, the Lady Cats show- 
ed no signs of breaking their old habits as 
they fell behind early but managed to pull out 
a 71-65 overtime victory against the Lady 
Jayhawks. 

Mossman said she would rather have her 
team be more in control of the game and not 
fall behind early, but as long as the Lady 
Cats continue to win, she is willing to make a 
little sacrifice. 

"We've been doing it all year," Mossman 
said. "We seem to fall behind, and then are 
forced to battle back. But, hey, as long as we 
come out on top in the end, it really doesn't 
matter." 

The victory, K-State's ninth straight at 
home this year, moved the Lady Cats' record 
to 15-3 overall and 4-1 in Big Eight Con- 
ference play Kansas fell below the .500 mark 
at 9-10 and is 2-3 in the conference. 

As in most close basketball games, the 
final outcome was decided at the free-throw 
line. K-State sank its last 11 free throws, in- 
cluding seven in the overtime period. The 
Lady Cats shot 90 percent from the line for 
the game, hitting 25-of -28 attempts. 

Kansas was not quite as fortunate from the 
charity stripe, but that could have been due 
to its inability to get there. Kansas only con- 
verted three of its eight chances and was 
outscored by 22 points from the line. 

"Earlier in the year,, we couldn't make 
anything from the line," Mossman said. 



"But it just shows you how hard our girls 
have been working." 

It was all K-State in the overtime period as 
the Lady Cats outscored Kansas, 13-7. 
K-State jumped out fast in the extra stanza 
with four quick points on free throws from 
Susan Green and Tracey Bleczinski. Kansas 
managed to pull within one, 62-61, with 3:30 
remaining, but Bleczinski was fouled as she 
hit a six-footer from the baseline. The 5-foot-8 
sophomore canned the free throw to put 
K-State up by four, 65-61. 

Carlisa Thomas then hit teammate Sue 
Leiding underneath with a nifty pass, and 
Leiding hit the easy layup for the eventual 
winning points. 



'We've been doing it all year. 
We seem to fall behind, and 
then are forced to battle 
back. But, hey, as long as we 
come out on top in the end, it 
really doesn't matter.' 
— Coach Matilda Mossman 



the clock. 

The possession arrow pointed toward 
K-State, and the Lady Cats were content on 
going into overtime as they held onto the ball 
after inbounding. 

"I felt good going into the overtime," a 
worn-out Mossman said afterward. "We 
really had the momentum late in the game, 
and I think the girls really felt confident go- 
ing into the overtime." 

Bleczinski led the Lady Cats with a game- 
high 16 points and also pulled down eight re- 
bounds. Thomas added 15 points and also 
grabbed a team-high nine rebounds to move 
her into second place on the K State career 
rebounding list. The 5-9 senior needs only 
three rebounds to break the all-time career 
rebounding record. 

Leiding also reached double figures in 
scoring for K-State with 10 points. 

Kansas was led by Martin in both scoring 
and rebounding with 12 points and 13 re- 
bounds. 

The Lady Cats lead the Big Eight Con- 
ference, with the Missouri, Oklahoma, 
Oklahoma State and Colorado tied for second 
at 3-2. 



K-State was forced to play catch-up the en- 
tire game. It outscored Kansas 8-2 in the last 
four minutes of regulation to tie the game. It 
was Bleczinski again from the line, as she 
canned both ends of a one-and-one situation 
with 19 seconds left in regulation to force the 
overtime period. 

After calling timeout with 13 seconds re- 
maining, the Lady Jayhawks had one last 
chance to win the game in regulation play, 
but freshman Lisa Braddy, who had been 
Kansas' sparkplug most of the night, was 
unable to connect on her 16-foot jumper from 
the key. Kansas center Jackie Martin re- 
bounded the miss, but was immediately tied 
up by Bleczinski with one second showing on 



KANSAS 
MARTIN 
WATERS 
SHAW 
OTT 

BRADDY 
Haw ley 
Baker 
Dougherty 
Siroughter 
Totals 

ROTATE 

THOMAS 
BLECZINSKI 
LEIDING 
GREEN 
FITZPATRtCK 
Smilti 
Had*** 
Punk 
Davidson 
Total* 



MIN Ffi M 

39 611 0-3 

34 Ml 
M 



24 

a 

27 
32 
M 
24 
32 
11 



0-1 
44 0-0 
J. 10 1-4 



2-5 
3-7 



0-0 
04 



sit 04 
0-2 0-0 
31-14 341 



MIN FG FT 

42 6-12 3-3 

4-10 6-9 

4-S 2-2 

24 S4 

3-1 2-2 

II <H> 

0-00 (Ml 

23 22 

1-3 J-4 

u-u 2s-« 



» 

41 
31 
33 

3 

I 

23 
13 



R 

13 
2 
S 
I 

s 
I 

(1 



» 

R 

9 
t 

5 
2 
4 




1 
o 

31 



F 

4 
4 
S 
I 

3 
I 
2 
2 

2f 

F 
3 
I 

2 
2 
2 
1 

2 
I 
IS 



TP 

12 
I 

ft 
I 
9 
4 
I 
VI 

II 



is 

16 

10 

9 

8 

2 

6 
S 
Tl 



Halftime wore: K -State 25. Kansas 30 
Turnovers K -State 29, Kansas 27 
Field goal percentage K-State 46 9. Kansas 41 9 
Attendance 2.HSO 



Mi 






■■MMI 



i 'W»»»O^^I 



WW 



WP 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday. Januiry 26, 1987 



Simms scores Bowl records, 
gives NY championship title 



By The Associated Press 

PASADENA, Calif. - The New 
York Giants vs. John Elway? How 
about the Denver Broncos vs. Phil 
Simms? 

The Giants won their first NFL 
championship in 30 years Sunday, 
scoring 30 points in the second half 
to beat the Broncos 39-20 in their 
first Super Bowl. 

The Giants' victory was earned 
primarily in two areas : the highly 
publicized defense and the under- 
publicized Simms, who ran a dis- 
tant second to his blond Denver 
counterpart in the pre-game hype. 

All Simms did was complete 22 of 
his 25 passes — a Super Bowl 
record 88 percent. He threw for 268 
yards and three touchdowns to be 
named MVP of the game. 

Simms also set a Super Bowl 
record with 10 consecutive comple- 
tions during the third and fourth 
quarter, when the Giants turned a 
10-9 halftime deficit into a 33-10 
lead without allowing as much as a 
first down to Denver. 

"Our offense had a lot to prove 
coming in to it," Simms said. 
"When I was warming up I told 
everyone, 'I've got it today.* I was 
throwing real well." 



"I think that ought to dispel any 
myth about Phil Simms," Giants 
Coach Bill Parcells said of his 
quarterback, frequently booed 
during his eight years in New 
York. "He was absolutely magnifi- 
cent today. That's as good as he 
has ever played." 

New York's second-half surge 
started innocently enough. 

Three plays netted 9 yards, and 
the Giants' punting team ran onto 
the field to punt from its own 46. 
Suddenly, the Giants shifted out of 
punt formation, and Jeff Rutledge, 
the second-string quarterback, 
came up behind center. 

The ball was snapped and 
Rutledge snuck for 1 yard and a 
first down. 

Six plays later, Simms hit tight 
end Mark Bavaro for 13 yards, the 
Giants led 16-10 and the rout was 
on. 

"It was about two feet," Parcells 
said of the fourth-down play. "You 
know, you're trying to win the 
game. This is for the world cham- 
pionship. It's not for faint-hearted 
people. He's either going to go for 
it or take a delay. If it's not there, 
I'll take the delay. He looked over 
at me. I nodded my head to turn, 
and he went for it." 



Denver Coach Dan Reeves 
lamented: "We just didn't have 
enough to make it interesting. 
They certainly are a great football 
team and they played a great 
game. In the first half, we should 
have scored about 10 more points 
at least. 

"We knew going into the game if 
we didn't take advantage of every 
opportunity, we'd be in tough 
shape," Reeves said, "The field 
position in the third quarter really 
killed us. We were backed up to our 
15-yard line the first three times 
we touched the ball. We felt going 
in we couldn't get in a scoring con- 
test with them." 

Most of Simms' handiwork came 
after a first half in which Denver 
outplayed the Giants, who were 
favored by 10 points, going off with 
a 10-9 lead that easily could have 
been 20-7 or 20-9. Early in the se- 
cond quarter, New York held 
Denver without a point after the 
Broncos had a first-and-goal from 
their 1 and Rich Karl is missed field 
goals from 23 and 34 yards for 
Denver. 

So dominant was Elway in the 
second period that he accounted 
for 200 yards on his own — 187 pass- 
ing and 13 rushing. 



Taylor, Giants' defense guides 
NFC champs to Bowl victory 



By The Associated Press 

PASADENA, Calif. - For 30 
minutes, the New York Giants' 
defense tried to finesse their way 
around John Elway and the 
Denver Broncos. 

That ended in the second half 
when the Giants did what 
linebacker Lawrence Taylor 
said they did what they do best — 
knock people's heads off — and 
they coasted to a 39-20 Super 
Bowl victory Sunday. 

"In the first half, we tried to 
read everything Elway and the 
Denver offense were trying to 
do," Taylor said. "We can't do 
that. We have to go out and be 
physical and run into people." 

New York did that for almost 
all of the second half and at one 
point outgained Denver 200 2 in 
total yardage. 

Giants linebacker Harry Car- 
son said the defense was very 
tentative in the first half, partly 
out of concern for Elway. 

"Elway made a couple of big 
plays because we didn't contain 
him," Carson said. "We also did 



a lot of dumb things. I had a 
penalty. Lawrence had an 
unsportsmanlike penalty and we 
put them in position to score. 

"We felt that in the first half, 
we just didn't play Giants' 
defense. We shut down the run, 
but then let them get a couple of 
long gains, and that's not our 
style." 

Carson said there was no panic 
in the Giants locker room at 
halftime, but he said they knew 
they had to stop Denver's offense 
early in the third quarter. 

"We felt we were a better 
ballclub and if we played 30 
minutes of good football, we 
would be the world champions. 
We knew we had to get them 
three and out <punt>." 

The play itself was simple, a 
2-yard quarterback sneak by 
second-string quarterback Jeff 
Rutledge early in the third 
quarter, but it gave the Giants 
the first down at their own 
48-yard line that started the rout. 

The Giants had taken the 
second-half kickoff and were in a 
fourth-and-1 situation at their 46, 



trailing 10-9. 

The Giants lined up in punt for- 
mation, but Rutledge was in the 
blocking back position, not Gary 
Reasons, who's usually deployed 
there. 

The Giants shifted into a 
T-formation with Rutledge 
kneeling under center and 
punter Sean Landeta going in 
motion from his spot some 15 
yards behind center Bart Oates. 

As the 30-second clock came 
close to running out, Rutledge 
took the snap and plowed slightly 
to his right for the first down. 

"We thought we really had to 
go after them offensively, not 
play conservative," Parcells 
said. "It's a gut feeling. 

"We've been doing that same 
little punt deal all season. We've 
been practicing it for about 15 
weeks. There are thrdeW four 
things we do out of it. 

"Rutledge is really heady guy. 
If he thinks it's there, he's going 
to run it. If he doesn't, he's going 
to take the delay of game. He 
looked over at me and I nodded 
my head." 




Staff Andy Nelson 

Oklahoma forward Uarryl Kennedy goes up for a shot, but K-State center Ron Meyer gets a hand on the ball and a 
hand on Kennedy during the Sooners 81-78 win. Meyer was called for a foul on the play. 



Tigers dump Buffs Henson 
for win No. 1,000 



Continued from Page 8 



By The Associated Press 

Missouri's victory was the school's 
1,000th win in 81 years. It was the 
370th for Coach Norm Stewart. 

"It has taken a lot of great players 
and a lot of support from people," 
Stewart said after the home court 
victory. "It's pleasing to be here this 
particular night and see it get done." 

The Tigers, 3-1 and 13-7, used a 
press to force Colorado into 13 tur- 
novers in the first half. Missouri 
defeated Colorado 77-56. 

"It's the same old story," said Col- 
orado Coach Tom Miller after the 
Buffaloes lost their 20th consecutive 
Big Eight game. "When we work 
hard and attack the press correctly, 
it doesn't affect us. When we 
hesitated, then it hurt us. We handle 
the press one time, but we don't the 
next and turn the ball over," 

Oklahoma State won its first Big 
Eight game for Coach Leonard 
Hamilton. The Cowboys are 1-3 and 
5-12 while Iowa State fell to 2-2 and 
10-7 after losing at home 

Danny Manning scored 30 points 
and grabbed 14 rebounds to carry 
Kansas past the Wolfpack. It was the 
eighth straight victory for the 



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Jayhawks at Kansas City, the last 
one coming when they beat North 
Carolina State in the finals of the 
NCAA Midwest Regional last year. 

"1 was able to turn, square up and 
take what the defense gave me, 
especially in the first half," Manning 
said. "We wanted to come in here 
and play well, but we also wanted to 
have fun. This was out of conference, 
but it means a lot because it's on na- 
tional television and everybody is 
watching you." 

North Carolina State made just 28 
percent of its shots. 

"Danny Manning is a great player, 
but that was probably our worst per- 
formance since I've been at North 
Carolina State," said Wolfpack 
Coach Jim Valvano. "We just didn't 
play well in any phase of the game." 

Manning scored 30 points and 
grabbed 14 rebounds to power 
unranked Kansas to a 74-60 victory 
over No. 20 North Carolina State in a 
non-conference game at Kemper 
Arena. 



shouldn't upset him too much. 

After all, he's got three years left 
in his collegiate basketball career. 

But Henson is a competitor And to 
a competitor, losses are tough to 
swallow. 

"After a loss," Henson said, "it 
usually takes me a while to get ready 
to go again. I think I lake losses a lit 
lie bit harder than some of the other 
people. But I'm sure by tomorrow, 
I'll be ready to go and get ready for 
the next game." 

Henson said he wasn't intimidated 
by playing against the likes of Mc 
Calister, who moved into fifth place 
on the all-time Big Eight scoring 
chart Saturday with an output of 34 
points. 

"I think we were all ready to 
play," Henson said. "We were fired 
up and ready to go. I was real ex- 
cited " 

Mc Calister and the Sooners, 
however, didn't want to let Henson 
get too pumped up for the game. 

"I don't like to get dogged by 
freshmen, so I had to put the 
pressure on him," McCa lister said. 




MEET OUR NEW STAFF 

AT THE 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Tuesday, Jan. 27 
Room 206, K-State Union, 7 p.m. 

Faculty, staff and retired members of the KSU 
Federal Credit Union are urged to attend the annual 
meeting. Come meet the new staff of Maria Mann, 
manager; Brenda Moffitt, assistant manager: and 
Greg Boynton, teller. Vote for colleagues who will be 
filling vacancies on the Board of Directors and the 
Credit Committee. A summary of the credit union's 
1986 business and financial condition will be 
presented. Use this opportunity to voice suggestions 
for improvements and new services. 

KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 

A seivice to' (acuity slalt arid quaiiiiPil gradii.ifp assistants 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, January 26,1987 



Wet weather prevents wheat planting 



By STACEV NANN1NGA 
Collegian Reporter 

The wet weather of late fall and 
early winter last year has many 
farmers worrying about their wheat 
crop ~- not about the crop they have 
in the ground, but about the seeds 
that didn't get planted. 
Jim Shroyer, extension agronomist, 
said the area hardest hit with this 
dilemma is the eastern third of the 
state, the worst being in southeast 
Kansas. Farmers in this area also 
had a hard time getting their wheat 
in the ground in the fall of 1985, he 
said. 

The wheat producer can still plant 
winter wheat, but it needs a cold 
spel! after germination to change 
from a vegetative stage into the 
reproductive stage for grain pro- 
ducts, a process known as vernaliza- 



tion. 

Shroyer said yields are going to be 
40 to GO percent lower if winter or spr- 
ing wheat is planted now, and the 
farmer should be aware of this. 

"A farmer who plants wheat now 
needs to realize that by maturing in 
the warm weather, the wheat is 
reduced in test weight and yield. 

"K-State researchers have grown 
winter wheat and barley after plan- 
ting in the last week of Febuary, but 
it resulted in lower yields," he said. 
"The weather in spring will dictate 
yields when planting after Febuary 
1. 

"Seeds take longer to germinate in 
the cold soil. They also need more 
time to head out because wheat is a 
cool-season plant and it will be 
maturing in warm weather," 
Shroyer said. "A plant that does not 
go through the vernalization process 



will not head out." 

Before the grain is formed, the 
wheat heads must emerge and go 
through a flowering stage, known as 
the heading process, that allows 
grain production to occur. 

"Planting late in the spring also in- 
creases the risk of leaf diseases, 
more greenbug attacks and lower 
test weights," Shroyer said. "It also 
requires higher seeding rates, 

"The spring of 1986 was ideal for 
such plantings and also for planting 
spring wheat. In some cases, 
farmers got yields of 25 to 30 bushels 
per acre, considered pretty good for 
the circumstances. ' ' 

Farmers must understand that 
they do not have to plant winter 
wheat. He said it is not too late to 
plant spring oats and barley. 

If a farmer is receiving deficiency 
payments from the government, 



Shroyer said he should contact the 
local Agricultural Stabilization and 
Conservation Service office to see if 
he still needs to plant a wheat crop on 
his land to maintain the base acreage 
for the deficiency payment program . 

Farmers receive deficiency 
payments to compensate for a 
market price that is lower than the 
government target price. 

There is still some indecision as to 
what crops the farmer will be re- 
quired to plant to maintain his base 
acreage, he said. 

The ASCS office has a form that 
can be filled out by the farmer who 
didn't get a crop planted. The form is 
called a preventive planting request, 
and Shroyer said it will protect the 
base acres on the farm so the farmer 
can maintain his present level of 
deficiency payments. 



Student organization raises money for refugees 



By KARI COMPTON 
Collegian Reporter 



By selling Guatemalan handcrafts 
at the Arts and Crafts Festival last 
semester, Students in Solidarity with 
Central America raised more than 
$700 for Guatemalan refugees. 

The handcrafts were of 
Guatemalan design and included 
such items as blouses, handbags, 
belts and purses. A group of 20 
Guatemalan refugees living in the 
Manna House of Prayer, a sanctuary 
founded by the Sisters of St. Joseph, 
made the handcrafts. 

Other Guatemalan refugees living 
in the United States and Mexico 
donated handcrafts to provide more 
income for those living at the sanc- 
tuary near Concordia, said Sister 
Betty Suther of St. Isidore's Chapel, 

Refugees have been staying at the 
sanctuary for two to four years, with 
new refugees constantly arriving, 
she said. 

Because the refugees are illegal 
aliens, they have been unable to sell 
their handcrafts for fear of being ar- 
rested and deported. Suther was con- 
tacted about the problem and re- 
quested SISCA's assistance, said 
Steve Milligan, graduate in chemical 
engineering and SISCA vice presi- 
dent. 

In existence for about four years, 
the Manna House gives refuge to peo- 
ple illegally in the United States 



because of persecution in their 
homeland, Suther said. 

Suther said government interven- 
tion into the sanctuary movement is 
always a concern. 

"There is a lot of public opinion 
there (favoring the refugees in Con- 
cordia), and we feel that favors us," 




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These positions are open: 
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Engineering— 8 
Agriculture— 5 
Human Ecology— 3 

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she said. 

The Manna House can support the 
refugees when they first arrive, 
Suther said, but once the refugees 
are settled, the staff encourages 
them to become self-supporting by 
finding jobs or selling handcrafts. 

The refugees plan to use the $753 to 
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maintenance of the sanctuary, she 

said. 

The main goals of SISCA are op- 
position to all government aid and in- 
volvement to Central American 
countries, and expressing this op- 
position to the community through 
educational programs and 
demonstrations, Milligan said. 



Program tries to end 
Kansas 'brain drain 



By The Collegian Staff 

In past years, some of the 
brightest high school students in 
Kansas have attended univer- 
sities outside of the state. The 
University's Scholarship Day pro- 
gram is an effort to reverse this 
trend. 

"Basically, it's a day to help 
stop the brain drain on the state of 
Kansas," said John Flemming, 
assistant director of admissions. 

On Thursday, selected high 
school students will be awarded 
scholarship certificates from the 
Putnam, University, KSU Foun- 
dation or the new President's 
scholarship funds. 

In addition to receiving scholar- 
ships, students will be able to in- 
teract with faculty members 
through activites such as a 
robotics demonstration by Donald 
Rathbone, dean of the College of 



Engineering, and Brad Kramer, 
assistant professor in industrial 
engineering, Flemming said. 

Assuming the acceptance rate 
for the Putnam, University and 
Foundation scholarships is 60 per- 
cent, the total amount awarded 
would be $126,000, he said 

An additional $5,500 from the 
President's scholarship fund will 
be awarded to the finalist of the 
National Merit Scholarship con- 
test. Also, a semi-finalist is 
guaranteed to receive $2,000 from 
the fund, said Larry Vitema, 
director of student financial 
assistance. 

"It's to show them that Kansas 
State University can offer them 
as good an education as anywhere 
else in the United States and that 
we can do it at a lower cost by pro- 
viding them with the academic 
scholarship money to be able to 
afford a good education." 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, January 2«, 1S»7^ 



11 



Teams participate in judging fS^e^ff j pr lc 

in beef cattle and eighth in reasons. agricultural journalism, seventh ^^^MQ99MA A V%1>9 



By STACEY CAMPBFXL 
Collegian Reporter 

While many K State students spent 
Christmas break skiing, working or 
catching up on sleep missed during 
the fall semester, students par- 
ticipating on the animal science 
judging teams were preparing for 
the 1987 National Western Inter- 
collegiate Judging Contest in 
Denver. 

Three K-State judging teams — 
livestock, meats and wool — par- 
ticipated in the contests. 

"We had an extremely tough con- 
test," said David Nichols, assistant 
professor of animal sciences and in- 
dustry and livestock judging team 
coach. "We placed sixth out of 28 
teams, but I know we can do better," 

"We judged 12 classes of livestock 
and gave eight sets of (oral ) 
reasons," said Matt Wineinger, 
junior in animal sciences and in- 
dustry. "There were three classes of 
hogs, four classes of sheep and five 
classes of cattle." 

Oral reasons are given to a panel of 
judges and are the individual stu- 
dent's reasons for placing the class 
the way they did. 

The livestock judging team's in- 
dividual placings were: Wineinger, 
third in beef cattle; Lance Huck, 
junior in animal sciences and in- 
dustry, eighth in sheep and sixth in 
reasons; Brad Krebs, junior in mill- 
ing science and management, sixth 



LFE and WiUtfii 



in beef cattle and eighth in reasons 

Dana Cecrle, junior in agriculture 
education, and Susan Reid. junior in 
radio-television, also participated in 
the National Western contest. Alan 
Johnson, junior in animal sciences 
and industry, and Howard Wood- 
bury, junior in animal sciences and 
industry, were alternates for the con- 
test. 

"Last fall, we (team members) 
took a class where we learned the 
basics of performance, judged 
classes of livestock and gave 
reasons," Wineinger said. "The 
stock show was a chance for us to ap- 
ply the knowledge we learned in 
class." 

The meats judging team, coached 
by Michael Dikeman, professor of 
animal sciences and industry, placed 
second in the overall competition at 
Denver. 

"The National Western meats 
judging contest is the most difficult 
junior-level contest that I've ex- 
perienced," Dikeman said. 

The meats judging team placed 
first in reasons and specification 
cuts, third in beef grading and lamb 
judging, fourth in pork judging and 
fifth in beef judging, he said. 

Individual results and members 
were: Daryl Yarrow, junior in 
agriculture education, high in- 
dividual overall, high individual in 
reasons, second in lamb and beef 
judging, and fifth in beef grading; 
Deborah Lyons, sophomore in 



agricultural journalism, seventh 
high individual overall and fifth in 
specification cuts; Mark Frisbie, 
sophomore in animal sciences and 
industry, ninth high individual 
overall, third in lamb judging and 
fourth in specification cuts; and 
George Lorette, sophomore in 
animal sciences and industry, first in 
specification cuts. 

Alternate team members who at- 
tended the contest were: Michael 
Dinkel, senior in animal sciences and 
industry; Kim O'Brien, sophomore 
in general agriculture; Melanie 
Mainquist, freshman in animal 
sciences and industry; and Lana 
Hammer, junior in agricultural 
economics. 

"It was a challenging contest 
because it was our first," Yarrow 
said. "But we had intensive prepara- 
tion during inter/session." 

Clifford Spaeth, associate pro- 
fessor in animal sciences and in- 
dustry, coached the wool judging to a 
third-place finish at the National 
Western judging contest. 

"We were the most consistent 
team as far as scoring goes," Spaeth 
said. "We missed first place by only 
eight points." 

The wool team members graded 15 
fleeces, evaluating each fleece on six 
components which reflect the com- 
mercial value of the wool, Spaeth 
said 



by Doug & Dick 



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The first step to profes- 
sionalism is to become a 
professional and the first 
step to becoming a pro- 
fessional is 

Alpha Kappa Psi 

Professional Business Fraternity 

Informational Pledge/ 
Active Smoker 

TONIGHT 

8:30 p.m. 

at 

Charlie's 
Neighborhood Bar 

Juniors & Seniors Majoring 
In Business & Economics 



Crossword 



Eugene Shelter 



ACROSS 
1 Swiss 

river 
4 Straw 

broom 
9 Lobster 

eater's 

protector 

12 Health 
resort 

13 Dispatch 
boiit 

14 — in 
the hole 

15 Bicycle 
feature 

17 Reiner of 
comedy 

18 Goddess 
of 
healing 

19 Chemical 
compound 

21 Take 
offense 

24 Letter 
before ba 

25 Hulla 
ballon 

26 .Jewel 
28 I'ert and 

saucy 
31 Break 

suddenly 
33 KndinK 

for scan 

or van 
35 French 

silk 



36 Kite or 


56 Decay 


bond 


57 Table 


follower 


m rap 


38 Through 


58 Bar 


40 Macaw 


legally 


41 Pulpy 


59 Self 


fruit 


DOWN 


43 Sweet or 


1 llarilwoixl 


hot 


tree 


45 Italian 


2 Psych. 


sausage 


org 


47 Ohio 


3 Fled 


college 


4 Bundling 


town 


5 Turned 


48 WWII org 


inside out 


49 Trees, 


6 Kindred 


shrubs. 


7 Japanese 


etc. 


city 


54 — Solo, of 


8 Edible 


•Star 


mush 


Wars" 


ro«»ms 


55 Slow, to 


9 Buth 


Scarlatti 


need 



Solution time: 23 mins. 



8F 



SE 



21 jJMaWHIDHM 






Yesterday's answer 



tfeJUfel 
I 26 



10 Sac -red 
image 

11 French 
baby 

16 Billy — 
Williams 

20 Ann's 
aunts 

21 Coarse 
file 

22 Ferber or 
Mil I. iv 

23 It's also 
called 
amole 

27 Chart 

29 Father 

30 l/>ap or 
fiscal 

32 Chinese 

wax 
34 Famous 

naval 

battle 
37 Wrinkle 
39 Kind of 

grass 
42 — 

Slitmlish 

44 (hum 

45 Lmiilnii 
district 

46 1 >n — 
(ft-uitl to) 

50 Tim 

. soi tall si" 

51 Anger 

52 "I'ea soup' 

53 WWII area 




1 26 

K K M It P F 



CRYPTOQU1P 



I' K I 



N E P F X 



II XXIX I K K R X F K K M P II N 

Yesterday 1 * Cryptoqulp: UNUSUALLY (SIFTED 
PROSPECTOR TURNED-CRITIC STILL PANS FOR 
GOLD TODAY. 

Today's Crypt<»uulp t lue K eijuals A 



HERBALIFE INDEPENDENT distributor Sea us tor 
products Call 776 51 14 or 776-1*65 (76 98) 

SUMMER IN Europe $299 Lowest Scheduled Fares 
lo all ot Europe lmm St Louis Call |3I4|727 6SS8 
(84) 



FOR RENT-MISC 



03 



RENTAL TYPEWRITERS- Correct inn and non 
correcting Typewriter ribbon? tor sale service 
available Hull Business Machines. 7)5 North 
121b. Aggteville. 559-1413 (2711) 



FOR RENT-APTS 



04 



TWO BEDROOM lunury rtupiei Fireplace garaoe 
west ot campus M50 Call 539 4294 or 776 25V. 
I69H) 

NICE ONE bod room apanmem Water I rash, two 
thirds gas paid laundry laniity Nice lor graduate 
sludeni or couple t26(Vmorith 539-2482 alter « 
pm (76 861 

FREE RENT m January Large two bedroom, nicely 
decorated, dishwasher disposal No pets $350 
deposit required 539 1465 (76 88) 

ONE BEDROOM two bedroom Apartments, tur 
n i shed or unturnished. tnew lurniturei Westloop 
area Call 776-9124 1781(1 

TWO BLOCKS west ot campus Quiet well main- 
tained one- bedroom apartment (or mature, non- 
smoking individual 1216 Lease No pels water 
beds 53? 9686 (82 86) 

MONT BLUE 
APARTMENTS 

Leasing for June 
•Studio, 1 & 2 Bednxim 
Apartments 
and Townhouses 
•Close to campus 
539-4447 

NEAR CAMPOS at nice qu«et location — two 
bedroom duplex available February 1 J270 Call 
5370152 (77B6I 

TWO BEDROOM luiury aparlment blocli from cam- 
pus Also, live bedroom house block and one-halt 
trom campus 539-4363 1 77 861 

ONE BEDROOM apart mem S205mion!h Gas. beat. 
wnt water included Lease and deposit required 
Call 537 7794 evenings or weekends (78 88) 

TWO BEDROOM luxury duplet, fireplace garage 
wesl ol KSU Available now 1425 Can 539 4294 
1 7811) 

LARGE TWO bedroom partially lurni shed basemen! 
apartment close locampus Mil VislaLane Own 
entrance no pets parking for iwo cars Deposit 
plus rent available now Pay own electricity Phono 
235-3550, TopeHa (79 38) 

LARGE WARM, two-badroom apartment live Blocks 
Irom campus No pels $300 Call 77601B1 (79tt> 

ONLY 

Homestead Rental 

HAS ALL 
YOUR RENTAL NEEDS 
♦Wide Selection 
♦Low Monthly Rates 
♦Instant Credit 
♦Immediate Delivery 
*No Deposit 
•Purchase Options 
♦Month to Month Lease 
♦No Hidden Costs 
♦Home Owned 
♦Friendly Scrv ice 
Furniture-TV-Appliances 

Homestead Rental 

537-8774 
2332 Sky Vue Lane 

NICELY FURNISHED Oflt/hall bUKWCWWU 
bills paid Furnished two plcckaJfeajnpui 
plus part utilities, (mnntn lo month iKase t - 
bedroom lurmsned two Moeka/ewi . 
Call 539 1349 IHO 84i 

A0JACENT TO campus 1224 B^rii 
bedroom wiih gmg* *ini»i .ind drye' .'. 
water trash Asknq J350 Can S37-1MS 91 537 
4422 182 90) 

ONE BEDROOM iu"nihed apa'tm"'' 
537 7313 01539-8401 One-hall block irom campus 
i83B?j 

TWD BEDROOM apartment pariniiy lu/ntantd 
close locampus with an conditioning Rent $255 
Call 539 7253 [83-881 



FOR RENT-HOUSES 



05 



TWO BEDROOM luxury duple» fireplace oarage 
wesl ol KSU Available now $425 Call 539-4294 



FOR SALE-AUTO 



06 



1980 CHEW Mania power Peering power brakes 
an automatic transmission Low miles good con 
dihpn Cail t-venings. 532-3681 iBC84i 

1986 FORD FI50 4>4 351 V8 4B supercab Low 
mileage Best otter 539 7409 181 91i 

197? GOLD volkswaqan van E«eellent condition 
$2,300 238 8092 (82 85l 



FOR SALE-MISC 



07 



EX -60 SILVER Reed typewriter Best o"er 539 7409 
(8i91i 

"llil\».> I Ion si- of* /Music 

DOD Effects 
30% Off 



327 Povnt/ 



776-74x1 



FOR SALE 40 gallon tish aquarium comes tully 
equipped Formoremtormalion call 778 7845 181 

m 

KELSEV li-cnannei mner $470 Make bass guilar 
$180, Ruslom powi amp $200 prices negotiable 
778 1925 183-87) 

Bored with the Untied States'.' 
Go International tor Spring Break! 

MAZATLAN. MEXICO 

FOR $199. 

Call Shawn at 776-9533 

Informational Meeting 

Tonight 7 p.m. at Kite's 

Video tape to be shown 

1 ypE WRITE R SEARS Com mental or i erase ribbon 
good condition, $150 539 9281 184 861 

DRAFTING TA6LE 42' long white plastic laminate 
top. pancil stop Regular pnea $1W. boughi lot 
$99. yours lor $90 Sorry, no personal checks Less 
t nan one week ol d ~ over budget m u s I sol I — e 1 1 ra 
sharp' John 532 2082 184 851 



FOUND 



10 



WOMEN S WEDDING band tound by Acked Hall 
Call 776 21 46 alter 5 p m to identify 184 86) 



HELP WANTED 



13 



PROFESSIONAL COUPLE in Kansas City Missouri 
seeking person to car* lor 1 5-month old Flat laun 
dry and preparation ol evening meat Room, board. 
salary. phone TV Pta/a location Call collect 816 
926 2020 or 816-444 2885 (76 85t • 



EARN $480 weekly -160 per hundred envelope-- 
slutted Guaranteed Homeworkers needed tor 
company proiecl slutting envelopes and assem- 
bling materials Send stamped, sell addressed en 
velope to JBK Main, rimpany. PO 8or J5 52. Cas 
taic Caiilrjrnia9t310 (7fi 1021 

AIRLINES. CRUISE LINES hiring! Summer Can* 
Good pay Travel Call tor guide, casket it nt 
yi(.<' 1916(944 4444 E<l »58 (76-1351 

UTij-jENTPErEPTIGNIST'VJrr'dPinr.tsor muslbe 
avaiiflbu lu work especially MomtV . ..-'inesday 
VI 1 F'llay mornings appronmalnlt 2D hr JU r^ pi?r 
uu'i* jiailing immedialely IdHl , ><■ ':• viulem 
villi slrontl inle'BSI m compulei deld Stoflenls 
.-.ilh employment potential ol two yews and eipe- 
nenca wilh miciocompuler application o.i I 
aiH be given preference Ranking la' ' 
GPA paid /rorv ptpenenr:** ■eQutintarice will* tni 
'jrucomputers andlongevilv potential w>i' M 
sidered Submit applications lo Debra Hydl rt 
RoomA2i AndersonHali Applications*!!! pear, 
cepted until Monday January 26 5 p.m iB2 84) 

PART TIME TO lull lime bookkeeper-accrninianl (ot 
complete set ol records Computer skills helplul 
Send or rjenver resume with references to LERN 
1554 Hayes Drive Manhattan KS 6850! Deadline 
Wednesday January 28 I82 84i 

HORTICULTURE STUDENT needed Part lime plant 
clerk I?- 15 hours/week Must be available 'o wmk 
Mondays a m Apply at Safeway Store Village 
Plaza 182-841 

THE KANSAS Cooperative E » ten si on Service has an 
opening lor student computet programmer TM 
position >s tor 20 bouts per week Hem me sched 
uie Applicants should be lamiliar with one ol the 
following languages Pascal C. or Put Summer 
employment is a possibility depending on per 
lormance For more information contact Dr Sieve 
Welch or Mary Knapp at 21 1 Umbergef. phone 532- 
7019 Application blanks are available trom the 
above individuals of Hi the Computer Science 01 
(ice and wilt be taken during Business hours 
through February 6 1987 183 92 1 

NEED EjtTHA cash'' Earn iiOQs weekly at home 
Ffee delailsi Rush self addressed stamped enve 
lope Sterling Enterprises Soi 1514 C Manhattan. 
KS 66502 (83 87) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT at Camp Lincoln/Camp 
Lake Hubert -Minnesota resident summer 
camps A strong commitment to working with chil 
dren required along with activity skills and leach- 
ing eipanance Spec iiiciob information andeopli 
cations are available al Career Pucement 
Qt( 1C e_Holl7 Ha" Siqn up in advance 'or per 
sonal interviews to be held on campus Tuesday 
f ebruary 3rd. and Wednesday February 4th 1987 
184 90) 



LOST 



14 



LOST UNDER s>» inches of snow Two keys attached 
10 ■ wooden leddy bear key ring between Fe"eli 
and King Please call 539-2059 attar 6 it round 
Thanks" i83 84] 

JANUARV 16 N E parking lot — a set Of keys on ■> 
brass huok II tound please call 532-6429 Ift* 85 1 

LOST GOLD chain necklace wilh angel charm II 
tound please call Debi at 537 1570 184-881 



NOTICES 



15 



NEED MONEY lor college*' Lei us maich you Mill 
scholarship and ijianl money to' which you can 
quality For morf ■ ■ AniBSiudenl Finan 
ciai AidSe'nce^ I6I3S W Chelsea D''ve Topeka 
KS 66604 182 911 

Ctiurtesj Demons! nit urn 

by Appnininicm 
tf;XI-5:3(l Momby-Saturdaj 

mounoRmfVT 



P- n«- 

Mm p. urn/ 



77fV453.S 



ATTENTION SCALPERS N««tourKU - 
ban iicnei for 
7087 ' 



PERSONAL 



16 



TO CUTF Mnnde in royal blue coat entering Blue 
m, ,.i i «an vVedni idayafaoui 12 ■ m : v* 

you in fie partui g ioi 3"J jijd'" 

■ 
mpi-, ■•■ i Dart naim 

■ i ■. - r . ■■ : ■ ■ 

- 

^nd L I' i , 

'.■ ■ 

Hij ! . Birth ' .. RA5 
DEAR r 

LISA jANt L - I J"' SO PTOUfl 0' »' U M 

pfeimm Bloom tidvOsHjiBS m Ifw 

l84l 

KAPPA MARIAN M-n til u 1 yOUl dreams bi.:< 
dai iies mine sun' Much lovffi Hiom 

L and l Patty i«4, 



ROOMMATE WANTED 



17 



MALE ROOMMATE needed -Across street tnw 

campus $i35'month plus utilities r7fccii69 i76 

88) 
MALE ROOMMATES-across sireel l-om campus 

1615 Andeisun Three bediooms ItuSmonth 

one-third utilities 7760827 16' (t5i 
THREE MALES -To snat« Iwo-lwdrOOm tpariment 

$95 month piui uMOIvtl Komi I " B 

work - 776 2340 alter 4 p m (63 861 

NON SMOKER OWN room neil to campus Rent 
nerqotiabie 7'*(i 3h.it betore 1 pm or adet 6pm 
' 15) 

WANTED FEMALE roommate 10 share house Own 
bedroom and bath MOO pet month induOMulili 
lie) Phone 77c 754' io2 84p 

ROOMMATE WANTED it'O ^nd one-lhitd ul 
Own washerdryei Spacious lots ol alOflQI 
$739 182 841 

MALE ROOMMATE -Iwo Tied room lumisned Mr- 
Cam Lane Ftrepi»:e CailSSS 1197 a(ief8pmi82 
86) 

MAlE ROOMMATE i5i warned lo share asm bedroom 
house Total expense about 1160 per month Ni, 
deposit available now 776-9222 (83 87) 

ROOMMATE TO share a two bedroom partially tur 
mshBd apartment Close lo campus with air condi 
boning, rent and utilities. I1S0 Can 539-7253 i83 
88I 

MALE ROOMMATE wanled to share new aparimeni 
Own room 1155 per month plus utilities 537 4347 
183-87) 

MALE ROOMMATE acrost slteet from campus at 
1230 Vainer Ground floor private room washen 
dryer lirtpiece $i35monm plus utilities 776 
9369 184 931 

FEMALE ROOMMATE lo share very nice two 
bedroom apartment Reasonable rent tow gtili 
ties 776 3134 Michelle |84 BSi 



SERVICES 



18 



PREGNANT 1 BIRTHRIGHT can help Free preg 

nancy test Confidential Can 537 9180 103 S 

Fourth SI . Suile 2S I till 
PROMPT ABORTION and contraceptive services m 

Lawrence 913641 5716 l39tll 
EXPERIENCED TYPIST- ft 10/page Dis... stoiage 

letter gualiiy reports, thesis etc 532-5981 or $37 

9205 Donnda (7B-88( 
TYPINGWORD processing Data sheets resumes 

letters term papers, dissertations etc Mrs Bur 

den 539 1204 (80 B91 

QUALITY TYPING lor $1 per page Contact John 539 
S839 18190) 

M ARTIE'S TYPING Service Word Processor 101' 
Juliette. 537-3314 Term papers theses disseila 
lions 8am to 5 p m (83 851 

READY FOR graduation -1 We romi 
aumes data sheets and letters Resume s 
1211 Moro Aggiemte 53? 7?94 i84 B6i 



WANTED TO BUY 



22 



WANTED JUDO gt lull call 532-4802 ask lot Ri 
chard 184-88) 

THREE JUOO gi's euee 3 4 Call 532 725 1 '84 H5l 



■M 



mmmmm m 



»- Wmf 



11 



^"^■^^••W^PI 






12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Monday, January 28, 1»I7 



Opponent 



Continued from Pa ge I 

brain-damaged people often are at 
the mercy of a legal system that 
favors the wealthy. 

"Oftentimes we're not executing 
innocent people," he conceded. 
"We're executing the poor SOBs." 

He said supporters of a death 
penalty measure are not considering 
that they may someday be victims of 
the law for which they pushed. This 
is because many murders are com- 
mitted in the heat of a fight or argu- 
ment — a situation which Lucero 
said could face anyone at any time. 

"The potential murderer in Kan- 
sas is not likely to be the person who 



Benson 



Continued fro m Page 1 

countries. 

Benson often uses a map to point 
out the countries as he plays music 
from the respective areas. He also 
demonstrates a country's origin by 
playing music with influences from 
Africa or from the Andes Mountains. 

While in Hastings, Benson was 
familiar with a classical guitarist in 
residence who taught him more 
about the techniques of playing 
classical guitar. 

When playing classical guitar 
music, as opposed to American folk 
music, Benson plays with his fingers 
rather than a pick. 

"American folk music is much 
more straight forward," he said. 
"There is a greater variety of 



drives down from Michigan and goes 
on a spree and murders four in Col- 
by," he said. 

Another reason against the adop- 
tion of the measure is the economic 
burden it will place on the state, 
which already is bending under the 
weight of budget cuts. 

Lucero said it will cost $9 million to 
build the state's death row, $2 million 
for five or six new judges and 
$250,000 for legal defense. He said the 
defense estimate is a very conser- 
vative one. 

"(Lawmakers) don't want the tax- 
payers to know what it will cost 
them," he said. 

Although Gov. Mike Hayden is 
committed to the adoption of capital 
punishment, Lucero said Hayden 
will not be responsible for authoriz- 



rhythms, for instance, in music from 
Latin America." 

Benson's interest in music is wide 
and varied. He plays flamenco, con- 
temporary, rock and bluegrass 
music. 

"There was also a time when I 
even played some Beach Boys 
music," he said. 

There is no one kind of music that 
appeals to Benson, and he does not 
concentrate on one style for too long. 

"I listen to Madonna's music one 
minute and to Indian music the 
next," he said. "I think those who on- 
ly play or listen to one kind of music 
are shutting themselves out." 

Besides playing for his Spanish 
classes, Benson has played for three 
of the styles classes in the music 
department. He performs about five 
concerts a year, and his perfor- 
mances contain music from various 
backgrounds. 







For more info 

call 

Rick McKenzie 

776-7521 



Spring Break in 
the Sunny South! 

South Padre Island 

$169 room only 
$279 with transportation 

Daytona Beach 

$139 room only 
$219 with transportation 

Ft. Lauderdale 

$219 room only 
$319 with transportation 



"N 



1 The Bus Stop Tours, Inc. J 




Play the game of the future at 

BONKERS 

Next Competition 
Tues. 27th 9 p.m. 

Enter Your Team Now 
College Students Enter FREE! 

TONIGHT-$2 PITCHERS 

Call 537-9591 I.D. Required 



ing the killing of a convict. 

"Mike Hayden will never sign a 
death warrant," he said, "It will be 
10 years before we execute anybody, 
minimally." 

Lucero said the way Kansans can 
defeat the measure is by writing to 
legislators and newspapers, 
although he said the press tends to be 
sensationalistic concerning capital 
punishment. 

"There seems to be more of a shap- 
ing of opinion by the news media 
than a reflection of news reports," he 
said. 

Despite a majority of citizens and 
legislators who support the measure, 
Lucero said he is confident it will be 
defeated. 

"We have an excellent chance of 
stopping this bill in the state senate." 



Election 



Continued from Page 1 

down from 38.2 four years ago. 

The projections showed the Greens 
with 8.2 percent of the vote, well up 
from the 5.6 they got in 1983. The in- 
crease is expected to greatly 
strengthen the party's hand in 
Parliament. A few independents 
picked up the remaining votes. 

Kohl, speaking at his party's head- 
quarters in Bonn, said the results for 
his Christian Democratic Union- 
Christian Social Union coalition were 
"gloomy and marked a painful loss." 

"It is certainly disappointing, but 
we will not let ourselves be 
discouraged," said Christian 



Democratic chairman Heiner 
Geissler, also speaking at the party 
headquarters. 

Among the biggest losers in the 
voting was Bavarian Governor 
Franz Josef Strauss, head of the 
Christian Social Union. 

Projections showed the Christian 
Social Union lost some six percen- 
tage points of the vote in Bavaria, 
which would give the party its worst 
showing in the conservative state 
since 1953. 

Kohl had been riding high in public 
opinion polls before Sunday's vote 
for parliament, buoyed by a healthy 
economy and an upbeat national 
mood. 

He blamed some of the lost votes 
on rainy, cold weather that kept tur- 
nout low. 



He has played for junior highs, 
high schools and universities in 
Nebraska and Kansas, as well as for 
church groups and weddings. He is 
scheduled to play for the K-State in- 
ternational activities group in 
March. 

Benson is married, and he and his 
wife have two sons at home. The 
Spanish professor said he would like 
to retire in the near future and go out 
on the road to perform. 

Benson practices for a half hour to 
an hour a day. 

"My family actually gets tired of 
hearing me play, so I play in the 
basement." 



State 



Continued from Page 3 



$350,000, he said. 

Hayden also recommended a 5 per- 
cent increase in other operating ex- 
penses, including instructional 
equipment and library books, Wefald 
said. 

Hayden's budget recommenda- 
tions showed "incredible courage" to 
use the $140 million federal windfall 
to build up the reserve accounts for 
the state, Wefald said. 

"If he hadn't used that windfall. 



there would have been no recommen- 
dations of any kind for any of the 
universities," he said. 

Hayden made it clear in his ad- 
dress that education would be his top 
priority, Wefald said, pointing out 
that other state agencies only receiv- 
ed a 1 percent increase in their 
budgets. 

"I think education is going to fare 
well under this administration," he 
said. 

Wefald said he was optimistic 
about the future. The adoption of 
Hayden's recommendations would 
be "a tremendous plus" for K-State, 
he said. 



According to ARD, whose projec- 
tions in the past have proven highly 
accurate, the business-oriented Free 
Democratic Party received a pro- 
jected 9.0 percent of the vote, a full 
two percentage points increase over 
1983. 

Many experts had predicted the 
Greens, with their anti-NATO and 
pro-environment stances, would 
benefit greatly from two major en- 
vironmental disasters last year : the 
nuclear power plant accident at 
Chernobyl in April in the Soviet 
Ukraine and the November spill of 
toxic chemicals into the Rhine river. 

ARD projections showed the 
Greens with 8,2 percent of the vote, 
well up from the 5.6 percent they got 
in the 1983 voting. The increase is ex- 
pected to greatly strengthen the par- 
ty's hand in Parliament. 

The Social Democrats gained 
slightly over their 1983 returns. ARD 
television's projected returns gave 
them 38.8 percent of the vote, a 0.6 
percent increase 

Kohl, 56, a conservative who ap- 
peals to strong family values, cam- 
paigned under the slogan "More of 
the Same." 

Rau was hampered throughout the 
campaign by divisions between the 
left and right wings of his Social 
Democratic party. 

Rau, also 56, failed to stimulate 
voters with his calls for a gradual 
end to nuclear power plants and the 
removal of U.S. -built nuclear 
missiles throughout Europe. 



COLLEGE of EDUCATION 
Student Council Elections 

Feb. 10-11 
in Bluemont lobby 

Applications may be picked 

up in Bluemont 013 and 

are due Feb. 2. 



i 






MECHANICAL 

ENGINEERS 

Robert Nieman, Boeing representative 
will speak on flight instrumentation 

Monday, Jan, 26 

Durland 152 

7 p.m. 

Everyone welcome and refreshments provided! 



ptitigBi^M M t i i i i^titiiititwtttiWtwaiMw w tiWMiii) 



£££££33&&34 






"WE CARE" about your health 

*Outpatient Clinic *Pharmacy 

*Lafemme (GYN) Clinic *X-Ray Department 

*Allergy Clinic ^Dietary Counseling 

*Mental Health Clinic *In-patient Hospital 

*Laboratory *Sports Medicine Clinic 

*PhysicaI Therapy Department *Wart Clinic 

*CIinic Hours: 8-1 1:30 a.m. 1-4:30 p.m. 

*24 hour, 7 days a week health care services 

*Time-saving Appointment System 

Call 532-6544 for an appointment 

LAFENE HEALTH CENTER 

' 'Your Medical Facility 




WINTER CLEARANCE ISALL 
FURTHER REDUCTIONS 



Selected 

suits *195-*315 

were*245-*395 

Sale does include big & tall sizes! 

All sportcoats 40% off 

except navy blazers 
Free alterations 



40% off 

Accessories 
Sleepwear 
Headwear 



All Fall sportwear40% off 
All outerwear 50% off 

(Exctudo Trench Coats! 

Fall slacks 40% off 




•»<r 









Weather 



Inside 



-■ - - - 

■ . 



- 




Mostly Sunny 



Mostly sunny today, high 40 to 45. 
Winds westerly to northwesterly 5 to 
IS mph. Fair tonight and Wednesday, 
low mid-20s. 



Committed 



Three K-State students have 
developed a program for high 
school students which emphasizes 
self-confidence and its relationship 
to student organizations. See Page 
3. 




Record Breaker? 

Lady Cats forward Carlisa 
Thomas is three rebounds 
away from breaking the 
K-State record. See Page 6, 



Kansas 
State 




Tuesday 

January 21, 1987 



Kansas State University 



Manhattan. Kansas 66506 



Volume 93. Number 85 



Reagan breaks silence, answers questions on arms scandal 



By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - President 
Reagan, silent for weeks on the Iran 
arms sale scandal, answered "all 
questions" Monday from an in- 
vestigative committee about 
authorizing secret weapon 
shipments to Tehran, the White 
House said. 

Reagan met for 76 minutes with 
the three-member committee he 
named Nov. 26 to probe the actions of 
the National Security Council staff 
following disclosure that profits from 



secret arms sales to Iran were 
diverted to Contra rebels in 
Nicaragua. 

R was the first time Reagan had 
discussed the Iran initiative with any 
outside group. 

"In the course of the meeting the 
president answered all of the panel's 
questions/' a White House statement 
said. "The wide-ranging review in- 
cluded the development of policy in 
relation to Iran, the factual history of 
the president's role in the Iran in- 
itiative and the U.S. foreign policy 
process in general." 



Gunmen seize 
more hostages 



By The Associated Press 

BEIRUT, Lebanon - Gunmen kid- 
napped two men believed to be 
foreigners from a store in Moslem 
west Beirut, dragged them by their 
hair to a getaway car and sped off. A 
store employee said the victims 
spoke broken English and might be 
Poles. 

Most universities and high schools 
in the Lebanese capita) staged a one- 
day strike to protest the abduction of 
three Americans and one Indian 
from Beirut University College on 
Saturday by gunmen disguised as 
police. 

Saturday's abductions raised to 23 
the number of foreigners missing 
after being kidnapped in Lebanon, 
including eight seized since Anglican 
Church envoy Terry Waite arrived in 
Beirut on Jan. 12 to seek the release 
of hostages. 

Waite remained out of sight for a 
seventh straight day Monday, the 
longest he has been underground in 
five trips to Lebanon. He was thought 
to be negotiating for the release of 
two American hostages held since 
1985. 

The Reagan administration, in a 
statement read by White House 
spokesman Larry Speakes in 
Washington, condemned the latest 
wave of kidnappings as a declaration 
of war against civilization, but told 
Americans to get out of Lebanon, 
warning "there's a limit to what our 
government can do" for them. 



Police said four gunmen grabbed 
two men from an office equipment 
store in the Sanayeh residential 
district at 11:30 am Monday. Police 
said they believed the victims were 
foreigners but did not identify them 
further. 

A Lebanese woman who works at 
the store said she thought the victims 
were Polish although she did not 
know their names. 

"They are familiar to me," she 
said. "They used to pass by us to 
photocopy documents. They always 
spoke broken English." 

"I knew them for a while as Poles. 
I cannot recall exactly why but 
assume they were first introduced to 
me as Poles," said the woman, who 
spoke on condition of anonymity. 

She said she saw four gunmen in 
civilian clothes drive up to the shop, 
and two of them entered the store. 
"Each of them grabbed one of the 
foreigners by the hair and dragged 
them out, bundled them into the 
Mercedes and sped away." 

The abduction was so quick that 
two policemen guarding a Western 
news agency office next door did not 
notice, she said. 

The employee and a second 
witness said one victim was blond 
with blue eyes and the other had dark 
hair. Both victims seemed to be in 
their early 20s. 

About 1,000 Beirut University Col- 
lege students demonstrated outside 

See HOSTAGES. Page 8 



Committee accepts fee 
for non-revenue sports 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 

Co llegian Reporter 

The f6-a-semester athletic fee pro- 
posal went through Senate Opera- 
tions Committee with little discus- 
sion as three Athletic Fee Task 
Force members answered commit- 
tee questions Monday night in the 
Union. 

The Senate Operations Committee 
makes grammatical recommenda- 
tions and corrections to legislation 
prior to its introduction onto Senate 
floor. 

First readings of the "Non- 
Revenue Sports Scholarship 
Referendum Proposal" begin at the 
Student Senate meeting at 7 p.m. 
Thursday in the Big Eight Con- 
ference Room of the Union. 

Before discussing the athletic fee 
proposal, the committee approved 
wording of a bill thai would regulate 
the athletic fee under Senate by-laws 
if the fee is assessed. 

The bill, sponsored by Task Force 
Chairman Doug Folk, junior in elec- 
trical engineering, and Kirk 
Caraway, senior in philosophy, re- 
quires a two-thirds Senate vote to 
create or change any fee under 
Senate jurisdiction. Senate laws cur- 
rently cover only the student activity 
fee. 

The bill was written to protect 
students from any "reactionary fee 
legislation," Folk said. 

"We want to get this in before the 
athletic fee comes up," Caraway 
said. "This will keep a little bit of 
stability in the system. We don't 
want, all of a sudden, to be hit with 



an increase." 

"It's pretty much a clarification," 
Folk said. "Probably, that's what 
(Senate) wanted to say in the first 
place." 

The athletic fee proposal, which is 
still unsponsored, states the greatest 
benefit to the Department of Inter- 
collegiate Athletics would be the 
ability to offer to K-State athletes the 
total amount of non-revenue sports 
scholarships allowed by the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association. 

Athletic department ad- 
ministrators have agreed to main- 
tain the allowed amount of scholar- 
ships for non-revenue sports while 
the fee is in effect, the bill states. 

The proposed amount of the fee 
was derived from 40 percent of the 
cost of the allowed 89 scholarships 
calculated at an out-of-state tuition 
rate of $5,440 a year. 

Monies generated from an athletic 
fee would be placed in a restricted 
account, then channeled directly to 
the Financial Aid Office to be used 
solely for non-revenue sports 
scholarships. 

A referendum conducted during 
Senate elections Feb. 10-11 is the 
"most logical and fair method" of 
determining students' desire for an 
athletic fee, the bill states. 

The bill reads as follows : 

Be it enacted that: 

- Members of the Student Govern- 
ing Association (all tuition-paying 
students) be permitted to vote "yes" 
or "no" on the following question 
during the SGA general election Feb. 

See FEE, Page « 



The statement said the group, 
known formally as the Special 
Review Board, will meet again with 
Reagan at his invitation. 

It was not known whether the 
president cleared up confusion 
resulting from contradictory 
statements by current and former 
White House aides about when he 
first authorized arms shipments to 
Iran. 

Robert C. McFarlane, Reagan's 
former national security adviser, 
has told Congress that the president 
had given prior approval for the first 



Israeli shipment of U.S. arms to Iran 
in August 1985. 

However, White House chief of 
staff Donald T Regan has said 
Reagan did not approve the ship- 
ment in advance, and Attorney 
General Edwin Meese III said the 
president approved it only when he 
learned of it after the fact. 

At the Capitol, meanwhile, Sen. 
Claiborne Pell, D-R.I., chairman of 
the Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee, said there was a link between 
the latest kidnappings in Lebanon 
and Reagan's arms sales with Iran. 



"When the administration engaged 
in exchanging weapons for hostages 
it started down a very slippery slope 
indeed, because it showed if people 
took hostages they might get 
something beneficial to them for do- 
ing that," Pell said. 

Reagan has denied that the arms 
sent to Iran were part of a swap for 
Americans held hostage in Lebanon. 
Instead, he has argued that the 
shipments were intended to help 
reopen contacts with a strategically 
important nation and that release of 
hostages was only a secondary goal 




Reagan has made no public men- 
tion of the Iran-Contra affair since 
before Christmas and has not 
answered any questions since a Nov. 
19 news conference. 

The three-member review board, 
headed by former Sen. John Tower, 
R-Texas, did not make a verbatim 
record of the president's testimony, 
on grounds that would be beneath the 
dignity of the office. 

Board spokesman Herbert Hetu 
said the group's report, due Feb. 19, 
probably would not contain details of 
Reagan's comments. 



Klansmen 
fling rocks 
at Stephan 

By The Associated Press 



Barnyard bale out 



Staff 'Andy Nelson 



After a hard day of mousing at the Horse Teaching and Research Center Monday, a barnyard cat relaxes on a 
bale of hay, oblivious to sweeping done by Clarke Jackman, junior in agricultural economics. 



TOPEKA - Kansas Attorney 
General Robert T. Stephan said Mon- 
day he has never seen the kind of 
hatred he saw on the faces of some 
people in Cumming, Ga., where he 
participated Saturday in a 
"brotherhood march" protesting the 
all-white status of Forsythe County. 

"I wasn't prepared for what hap- 
pened," Stephan told his staff and 
reporters during a briefing in the 
Kansas Judicial Center. 

"I have never seen the face of hate 
as I saw that day. It was 
unbelieveable. The black people who 
are the real targets have to face that 
all the time." 

Stephan admitted to being afraid 
when the situation nearly turned ug- 
ly in late afternoon Saturday as some 
20,000 demonstrators marched into 
Cumming and were met by 
obscenity-shouting Ku Klux 
Klansmen and their sympathizers 

"It was frightening," Stephan 
said. "I can tell you 1 was scared 
because I didn't know what was go- 
ing to happen next. At that point, it 
was hard for me to believe 1 was still 
in this wonderful United States of 
America." 

Stephan was struck on the right 
shoulder blade by a rock about the 
size of a large hen egg He said he 
assumed it was hurled by someone 
from behind the Forsythe County 
Courthouse while the crowd of white 
and black demonstrators gathered 
on the front side of the courthouse. 

The rock didn't hurt much. 
Stephan said, because he was wear- 
ing a padded jacket which absorbed 
the blow. 

However, Stephan said he became 
concerned enough about the rock 
throwing that he placed his gloves in- 
side a stocking cap he took with him 
and put the gloves and cap on his 
head to protect it. 

"What 1 wanted to do with it < the 
rock) was take it and cram it down 
somebody's throat," Stephan said. 
However, the marchers had been 
cautioned against letting anything 
provoke them to violence. 

"It was hard not to respond to peo- 
ple like that," Stephan said, "but 1 
did what the leaders told us." 

Stephan said he didn't hear of any 
other elected public officials atten- 
ding the march. 

See STEPHAN, Page 8 



New lecture series travels across state 



By TOM DENZEL 
Collegian Reporter 



Kansas high school and communi- 
ty college students and teachers will 
have the opportunity starting this 
spring to hear some of K-State 's 
most stimulating professors and 
researchers speak in classes and 
assemblies. 

President Jon Wefald began laying 
the foundation for the new Presiden- 
tial Lecture Series shortly after his 
arrival on campus last July. 

"This is not being viewed as a 
recruiting tool but as source of shar- 
ing information, a by-product of the 
traditional recruiting methods,'' said 
Marilyn Trotter, director of new stu- 
dent programs and coordinator of 



the lecture series. 

The main goal of this lecture series 
is to bring the university way of lear- 
ning to the students, Trotter said. 

"We want the students to get the 
feel and excitment of university lear- 
ning." said Wefald, who will speak 
on "One Person Can Make a Dif- 
ference," as part of the series. 

Requests from high schools and 
community colleges for guest 
speakers had been received by Trot- 
ter's office prior to the formation of 
the lecture series, she said. 

College deans and department 
heads nominated professors from 
each department for the lecture 
series. The names were then given to 
Trotter, who contacted the faculty 
member and asked them if they 



would like to speak in front of a high 
school or community college au- 
dience. 

Because the funding for this pro- 
gram will be provided by the KSU 
Foundation, which is supported by 
donations, the program will not be 
affected by state budget cutbacks, 
Trotter said 

Brochures will be mailed in the 
coming weeks to high schools and 
community colleges in Kansas and 
the Kansas City, Mo .. area with a 
schedule of topics and featured 
speakers 

"With an opportunity like this, I'll 
be very surprised if we don't have a 
large amount of requests," Trotter 
said. 

While the scries is not geared 



specifically toward attracting 
students, Hermann J. Donnert, pro- 
fessor of nuclear engineering, said 
he believes the lecture series will be 
an effective recruiting tool. In the 
past this was done by word of mouth, 
now it is being done on a more formal 
level with a wider publicity cam- 
paign and better organization, said 
Donnert, who will present "Cher- 
nobyl and Three Mile Island - The 
True Story," in the series. 

"This is a great opportunity for 
K-State to explore," said Robert 
Hollinger, professor of finance, who 
will speak on "Time, Value and 
Money." 

Topics in the lecture series include 
leadership, personal motivation, 
careers and design. 



•mm 



^^^■WPPiWPI 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, TuMday, 



27, 1917 



Briefly 



By The Associated Press 



INTERNATIONAL 

Ministers join protesting Filipinos 

MANILA, Philippines — President Corazon Aquino sent Cabinet 
ministers to join 15,000 protesters marching on the presidential 
palace Monday, defusing some of the wrath over last week's 
shootings and proving her control over the military. 

She overruled military officers who said they could not ensure her 
safety. 

Aquino lifted barricades around Malacanang Palace and kept 
soldiers away to allow students, workers and peasants to march to 
condemn the killings of 12 leftist protesters by marines last Thurs- 
day. 

She dispatched at least eight of her ministers to lock arms with 
demonstrators Monday and lead them peacefully to the palace gates. 

Her action softened the anger of both left- and right-wing groups, 
who said her administration could not control the military and was 
responsible for a street clash bloodier than any during the 20-year 
Marcos era. 

Soviets rescue fishermen from ice 

MOSCOW — Emergency crews rescued 1,200 Latvian fishermen 
from drifting ice floes in the Gulf of Riga that had been ripped from 
shore by hurricane-force winds, Tass said Monday. 

The official news agency reported that the last of the castaways 
was rescued Sunday evening and that the rescue operation was 
declared "successfully completed" on Monday when no other sur- 
vivors were found. At least some people were pulled from the water. 

However, the government newspaper Izvestia said there were 
some deaths in the ice break at Jurmala, a resort on the Latvian 
coast. It gave no further details. 

An official of the Sea Rescue Society in Jurmala told The 
Associated Press by telephone earlier in the day there were no 
fatalities or serious injuries. 

Tass said the rescue operation began Sunday after the ice 
fishermen ignored posted warnings and loudspeaker announcements 
to stay off cracked ice extending from the shore. 

The rescue official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the 
fishermen had gone onto the ice for weekend ice fishing, a favorite 
Soviet pastime. 

"A small crack in ice along the shore was detected Sunday morn- 
ing," Tass said, quoting Janis Robez, chief of the rescue operation. 
"Special signs were put up — 'Be careful, dangerous for life.' Staf- 
fers of the seaside rescue station warned of possible danger over 
loudspeakers. Signal flares were fired into the air. But many ice 
fishing enthusiasts dismissed all this as overcautiousness." 

REGIONAL 

Mayor plans 'Fountain of Justice' 

TOPEK A — Topeka Mayor Doug Wright announced Monday fun- 
ding has been secured through private donations and construction 
will begin as soon as weather permits on a "Fountain of Justice" to 
be built in front of the Kansas Judicial Center. 

Original plans for the Judicial Center, located immediately south of 
the Capitol and opened in 1978, called for such a fountain, but it was 
scrapped because of lack of funding by the Legislature. 

"It will be a reality," Wright said at a ceremony in the Judicial 
Center. "It is a gift to the people of Kansas in honor of those who 
have carried out the battle for justice in our state and those who will 
follow." 

A May 1 completion date is hoped for, in time for the annual obser- 
vance of Law Day. 



NA TIONAL 

American released from Managua 

WASHINGTON — Sam Hall, an American arrested last month in a 
restricted military area near Managua who later claimed he was on 
a spy mission, will be released for health reasons to the custody of 
his brother, Rep. Tony P. Hall, the Nicaraguan embassy announced 
Monday. 

The decision was taken after a medical checkup and clinical 
reports on the 49-year-old prisoner determined he had a condition 
that could not be cared for properly in Nicaragua, said the embassy 
spokeswoman, Sarah Porta. 

The ailment was not described. 

Hall, who was arrested Dec. 12, said at a news conference in 
Managua 10 days later that he was spying on military installations on 
behalf of three men code-named Tinker, Evers and Chance. 

He also claimed in a CBS-TV interview that he was the only re- 
maining member of the Phoenix battalion, which he described as a 
counter-terrorist paramilitary organization. 

LaRouche announces candidacy 

CONCORD, N.H, — Fringe candidate Lyndon LaRouche, accusing 
President Reagan of "digging himself deeper and deeper into the 
political mire," on Monday announced his candidacy for the 1988 
Democratic presidential nomination. 

In a prepared statement, LaRouche said he was "accelerating my 
own presidential campaigning" because of President Reagan's 
troubles with the Iran arms deal. 

LaRouche was in Europe and did not attend the news conference. 
His supporters also said his safety in New Hampshire could not be 
guaranteed. 

A four-time presidential candidate and native of Rochester, N.H., 
LaRouche now lives in a fortified estate in Leesburg, Va. 

Until adequate security is supplied by the Secret Service, 
LaRouche will not campaign in person in New Hampshire, the state 
with the earliest presidential primary, his supporters said. 

LaRouche espouses bizarre theories of world conspiracies. He has 
accused the Queen of England of being involved in the drug trade, 
says the United States is headed for economic collapse and that the 
Holocaust is fiction. 

Friends remember Dwyer as 'hero' 

MEADVILLE, Pa. — State Treasurer R. Budd Dwyer was buried 
Monday after being eulogized as a hero who took "desperate action" 
to bring attention to the criminal justice system he believed had 
wronged him 

About 700 mourners crowded into services at the First Baptist 
Church in a quiet square of Dwyer's northwestern Pennsylvania 
hometown. Later, his dark brown wooden casket was taken to Bloom- 
ing Valley Cemetery, about 10 miles away. 

"Today I can say without equivocation, he did nothing wrong and 
he died an innocent man," said Roger Richards, an attorney and 
family friend who delivered the eulogy. 

"Mr. Dwyer's suicide was a desperate act of one who loved the 
system so much that he would even take desperate action to promote 
its healing. Those in power would listen to nothing else," said the 
church's pastor, the Rev William J. Minser. 

Dwyer put a gun in his mouth and shot himself to death at a news 
conference in his Harrisburg office Thursday, a day before he was to 
be sentenced on charges he took part in a bribery conspiracy in the 
awarding of a state contract. He had been convicted on the charges 
last month and faced a maximum 55 years in prison. 

Former state Republican chairman Robert Asher, convicted with 
Dwyer, is to be sentenced Tuesday. 





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GRAND OPENING 

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Campus Bulletin 



TODAY 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATORS BIBLE STUDY 
■I 7 a.DI, in Union Stateroom I. 



GERMAN CLUB meets *t 4 p.m. in Union 313 

AMERICAN INDIAN SCIENCE AND 
ENGINEERING SOCIETY meets at 4 : SO p m . in 
Durland33. 

NATIONAL A(JR1 -MARKETING ASSOCIA- 
TION meet* at 7 p.m. In Union 307 

PHI UPSILON OMICRON meets at 7 ; 30 p m in 
Union 213. 

HORSEMEN'S ASSOCIATION meet* at 7:30 
p.m. in Call 30*. 

A1PHA PI MU meats at 7 p.m in the Industrial 
Engineering Library. 

UNIVERSITY FOR MAN will have a table in 
the Union from to a.m. to 2 p.m. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL has scheduled the 
final oral defense of the doctoral dissertation of 
Dale Alexander Neeck at 12-30 p. m in Bluemont 
388 The dissertation topic wtU be "Structure, 



Management and Interventions : The St. John 
Mode! Applied to Saint Mary's Academy and Col 



U-LEARN will have • table In Union from ■ 
a.m. to 2 p.m. to sign up volunteers 

COLLEGIATE Vf\ meets at 130 p.m in 
Waters 137 

SOCIETY OF WOMEN ENGINEERS meets at 
« 30 p.m. in Union Little Theatre 

GERMAN TABLE meets at II : 30 a.m. in Union 
Stateroom 2 

WHEAT STATE AGHONOMY CLUB meets at 
7 p.m. in Throckmorton 313. 

AG TELEFUND TEAM CAPTAINS meet at 
4:30p.m. In Waters 135 

ACT meets at 0:30 p.m. in the Union 

SOCIETY OF MANUFACTURIM' 
ENGINEERS meet at 0:30 p.m. in Durland 163 

ASSOCIATION OF ADULTS RETURNING TO 
SCHOOL meets from 11:30 am to 1:30 p.m in 
Union Stateroom 3 



Notices 



The Department of Art and 
KSU Friends of Art are still tak- 
ing reservations for a trip to view 
"Born Free and Equal: 
Photographs by Ansel Adams" 
now on display at the Nelson- 
Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas 
City, Mo. 

A bus will leave at 7 a.m. Satur- 
day from the Union, said Diane 
Dollar, instructor of art. Par- 



ticipants will be required to pay a 
$20 registration fee. 

Filing deadline for Student 
Governing Association elections 
is today. Applications are 
available in the Student Govern- 
ment Services office for student 
body president, student senators 
and Board of Student Publica- 
tions. 



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MEET THE CALENDAR 

MEN 
OF K-STATE 

Autograph Party at 

Brother's 
9 p.m. Wednesday 

Calendars on sale 
at the door 



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Clinic and Hospital 

532-6544 

Mental Health 

532-6550 

Lafemme Clinic 

532-6554 

Pharmacy 

532-7758 

Sportsmedicine Clinic 

532-7880 

Physical Therapy. 

532-7880 

Health Education 

532-7755 

Administration 

532-7755 

Cashier 

532-7759 



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KANSAS fTATl COtLgQIAH. Tu— Jay. January 27, 1MT 



' 



UPC offers art rental 



By The Collegian Staff 

Artwork varying from framed 
laser photos to reproductions of 
well-known paintings will be 
available through the Union Pro- 
gram Council Arts Committee art 
rentals program this week. 

Students, faculty and staff may 
rent pieces for the spring 
semester from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
Tuesday and Wednesday in the 
Union Courtyard. 

The art rental program is at 
least 15 years old, said Marilyn 
Woodward, adviser of the Arts 
Committee. The program has 
been fairly successful, although 
some art pieces have been lost in 



the past, Woodward said. She 
stressed that the art rentals pro- 
gram is a service for the students, 
faculty and staff and not a money- 
making process. 

Woodward said rent cost is 
determined by the artwork 's 
value and si2e Rent for one piece 
ranges from $1 to $4. 

In order to rent, a person must 
sign a contract accepting respon- 
sibility for the artwork. In the 
case of damage to the artwork or 
frame, there will be a charge for 
the repair fee. If the artwork is 
stolen or lost, the rentee will be 
required to pay the minimum 
replacement fee of $50 or full 
assessed value of the work. 



Workshop to encourage young leaders 



By TODD SCHULTZ 
Collegian Reporter 



Three K-State students have in- 
itiated a program to help high school 
students develop leadership and 
communication skills. 

The program, "Commit To Ex- 
cellence," is designed to help 
students understand their talents 
and how they can apply them to their 
organizations. 

Kim Buethe, junior in animal 
sciences and industry, Michelle 
Benoit, junior in agricultural 
economics, and Stacey Campbell, 
junior in agricultural journalism, 
give workshops for youth groups on 
personal communication and leader- 
ship skills, team organization, public 



speaking, goal setting and 
parliamentary procedure. 

"We all had had the opportunity to 
work with young leaders in FFA, 
when we served as state officers (in 
Future Farmers of America)," 
Campbell said. 

While Campbell and the other two 
students who developed the program 
enjoyed interaction with the high 
school students, he said they realized 
a need for some type of program that 
would help students believe in 
themselves and their abilities. 

To help reach that goal, the 
workshops emphasize group par- 
ticipation. Some include skits, but 
they all focus on audience input, 
Buethe said. 

"Our goal, as a team, is to instill 



Musical review to open McCain series 



By The Collegian Staff 

The Young Americans, a group of 
singers aged 15 to 21, will kick off Mc- 
Cain Auditorium's performance 
series of the semester Thursday. 

"One thing about the Young 
Americans I believe some people 
didn't realize, is that they are doing a 
musical review instead of just a 
choral performance," said Stephen 
Riggs, director of McCain. "It is a 
full-blown production." 

The Young Americans will present 
an all-new musical version of 



"Around the World in 80 Days," 
featuring songs and dances from 
many countries. The performance is 
presented by Columbia Artists 
Festival Corp. and will begin at 8 
p.m. 

The group was founded in 1962 by 
Milton Anderson, director, in an ef- 
fort to give the nation and the world a 
realistic picture of youth in this coun- 
try. The Young Americans was one 
of the first choral groups to dance to 
the music it sings. 

Performance revenues help pay 
for the group's activities, including 



tours abroad, stage and dance train- 
ing, room and board, and costumes 
and sets. 

The Young Americans has a cast of 
45 members and has appeared on 28 
television shows on ABC, NBC and 
CBS networks, as well as Japanese, 
Australian and Korean networks. 

Recently, The Young Americans 
received an Oscar for a full-length 
documentary feature with Columbia 
Pictures. 

"This is the first (performance) 
this semester," Riggs said, Tickets 



are going fast, and it's really starting 
to pick up this week." 

Tickets for the performance are $6 
to $10 for students and senior 
citizens, and $10 to $14 for the general 
public. Tickets may be purchased at 
McCain Box Office. 

Immediately following the perfor- 
mance, all students are invited by 
the McCain Development Board for a 
post-performance gathering to meet 
the members of The Young 
Americans. The reception will be in 
Leavengood Court in the McCain 
music wing. 



Council recognizes publications for excellence 



By The Collegian Staff 

Two K -State publications received 
awards for achievements in writing 
during a Jan. 14 district awards com- 
petition in Lincoln, Neb. 

"Perspectives," edited by Cheryl 
May and designed by Valerie 
Spicher, graphic designer for 
University Relations, won an award 
for excellence in special audience 
magazines from the Council for the 
Advancement and Support of Educa- 
tion. 

The magazine, published four 




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times a year, contains stories 
relating to campus research ac- 
tivities. 

"Winning the CASE award shows 
that 'Perspectives' is indeed a top- 
notch publication," May said. 

"Unfortunately, due to budget 
cuts, many other really good publica- 
tions weren't able to be entered," she 
said. 

"Bring the Garden to Life," a pam- 
phlet written by Rusty Andrews, 
director of communications for the 
KSU Foundation, won an award for 



exceptional achievement in fund- 
raising appeals. 

The pamphlet was printed to raise 
money to establish a horticulture 
garden at K-State. The fund-raising 
goal is $100,000, and $75,000 to $80,000 
has been raised, Andrews said. 



"We're sending the brochure and 
letter nationwide to companies with 
an interest in horticulture." he said. 

To be considered eligible for the 
CASE competition, publications 
must be written by a staff member of 
a university. 



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enthusiasm and excitement in 
members for their organizations as 
well as themselves," Benoit said. 

"It is the greatest feeling to go out 
and interact with students while do- 
ing the workshops," Campbell said. 
The workshops may begin slowly, 
but soon the students are laughing 
and responding to questions, he said. 

Most of the workshops have been 
for FFA chapters, but the program is 
designed to meet with any high 
school student councils, Future 
Homemakers of America chapters, 
4-H clubs and other high school voca- 
tional organizations, Campbell said. 

"We work on building the in- 
dividual and helping each realize 
their talents and abilities. We then 
show them how to use these talents to 



make their organization better," 
Buethe said. The goal is to show 
students how to use their talents to 
help the group, she said. 

When implementing the program 
last summer, Campbell said they 
asked for sponsorship from local 
businesses One business donated 
some money, but the rest of the 
financing came from the three 
students, he said. 

Campbell said the program which 
is scheduled for Thursday at Buhler 
will be the biggest challenge that the 
group has yet to face. 

"Our previous workshops have 
consisted of about 35 students, and at 
Buhler we are looking for 350 
(seventh and eighth grade 
students)," Campbell said 



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MEET OUR NEW STAFF 

AT THE 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Tuesday, Jan. 27 
Room 206, K-State Union, 7 p.m. 

Faculty, staff and retired members of the KSU 
Federal Credit Union are urged to attend the annual 
meeting. Come meet the new staff of Maria Mann, 
manager; Brenda Moffitt. assistant manager; and 
Greg Boynton, teller. Vote for colleagues who will be 
filling vacancies on the Board of Directors and the 
Credit Committee, A summary of the credit union's 
1986 business and financial condition will be 
presented. Use this opportunity to voice suggestions 
for improvements and new services. 

KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 

A service tof tacuMy slat) and qualified gtaau.it,* j ■■ itanls 



1 



Editorial 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tuesday, January 27, 1987 - 4 



Studying abroad allows understanding 



K -State's International Coordinating Com- 
mittee has a saying that it has on its logo: 
"Be international." ICC, an arm of the Stu- 
dent Governing Association, coordinates fun- 
ding and activities for international 
organizations at K-State. 

The importance of the saying "be interna- 
tional" cannot be stressed enough. Develop- 
ing an international attitude and outlook on 
life can change your life forever. It did mine. 

When I was an undergraduate, I was very 
fortunate to be offered the opportunity to 
study abroad. At the time, my 
undergraduate alma mater, State University 
of New York, offered, among many others, 
an overseas study program at the University 
of Siena in Siena. Italy. When I read about 
the program while glancing through a 
university catalog, I knew I had hit on 
something very exciting. But the opportunity 
to study abroad did not come knocking at my 
door — I had to find it. 

Like many situations in life (especially the 
ones you want more than anything), getting 
accepted to an overseas study program took 
a bit of time and filling out lots of paperwork. 
I knew the Siena program very possibly was 
not the right program for me and certainly 
not the only overseas study program offered. 
I searched through dozens of brochures and 
compared the various programs and realized 
that the Siena program was still the one for 
me. 



Though my undergraduate degree was not 
in art history, Italian or the study of contem- 
porary Italian society, this is what the Siena 
program offered. I had gotten many of my 
core courses out of the way during my first 
two years of college, and so I experienced no 
problem academically by taking many of my 
electives and required humanities courses in 
Italy. Most degree programs require some 
language instruction, literature, history, etc. 
so I said to myself, "Why not in Italy?" 

On the basis of good grades and having the 
financial resources to go, off I went to school 
in Italy for my junior year of study. 

Being a "foreign student" gave me such a 
different view of life. I felt the same in 
securities that foreign students undoubtedly 
felt at my big, impersonal New York univer- 
sity. Knowing very little Italian, I sat in the 
classes of this small but prestigious Italian 
university, surrounded by European 
students who spoke not only Italian but 
several languages. There were many times 
when I could have crawled under the table in 
the student cafeteria after asking for so- 
meone to pass what I thought was the salt, 
but instead asked for something that cannot 
be mentioned here. 

Living with an Italian family, all of whom 
spoke no English, cured my ignorance of 
Italian real quick. They treated me like 
royalty while I lived in their home, as the 
Italians do all their guests. Needless to say, 



Meese makes it clear: 
Miranda is next target 



Now that Ed Meese has had his 
fill of pornography, the attorney 
general is looking to tackle 
another "infamous" aspect of 
American society — the Supreme 
Court decision that requires 
police to inform criminal 
suspects of their legal rights. 
Meese is reportedly looking for 
the "right case" to come before 
the Supreme Court so that a 
review of the 1966 Miranda vs. 
Arizona decision may be under- 
taken, Miranda established the 
law that officers had to inform 
the accused of his or her rights 
upon arrest. 

Meese and law enforcement of- 
ficials contend that police are 
hindered from obtaining confes- 
sions and other important infor- 
mation from suspects because of 
this law. 

Inevitably, suspects will go 
free because of a technicality, but 
what is the alternative? Evidence 
obtained would be used in court in 
direct violation of the Fifth 
Amendment right against self- 
incrimination, 

Meese finds justice flawed 
because criminal suspects who 



are informed of their rights upon 
arrest can refuse to answer ques- 
tions without the presence of a 
lawyer — a major advance in 
protecting individuals from 
police coercion. An internal 
Department of Justice report 
which Meese fully supports 
stated that overturning Miranda 
would be "among the most im- 
portant achievements of this ad- 
ministration — indeed, of any ad- 
ministration — in restoring the 
power of self-government to the 
people." 

How this move would restore 
self-government to the people is 
unclear. There is no reason con- 
stitutionally guaranteed rights 
should be kept secret from the 
criminal suspects they were 
designed to protect. 

There are limits on the power 
of the state, and Miranda was 
designed to make sure citizens 
are aware of these limits. Miran- 
da provides essential protection 
for individuals from becoming 
the victims of an overzealous 
state with a guilty-until-proven- 
innocent mindset. 



Georgia racial attack 
reflects ugly mentality 



Those who think racial 
discrimination is a thing of the 
past better think again. Another 
example of ignorance and bigotry 
has reared its ugly head, and the 
scenario is not unlike actions 
common some 20 years ago. 

The march of nearly 25,000 civil 
rights demonstrators through the 
all-white town of Gumming, Ga., 
Saturday was to protest an attack 
by 400 Ku Klux Klansmen on a 
group of Martin Luther King Jr. 
supporters Jan. 17. That the at- 
tack happened at all indicates the 
town still possesses the blind 
narrow-minded perceptions 
many people held two decades 
ago. Gumming is a town time and 
enlightened attitudes forgot, a 
town afraid to admit its faults 



and accept blacks for who they 
are — human beings no different 
from anyone else. 

In the wake of the Rev. Martin 
Luther King Jr. 'a birthday, it is 
difficult to believe the town's pre- 
judice could have existed this 
long without being influenced by 
the changing thoughts of the rest 
of the world. It is scary to think 
how many other areas of this na- 
tion share the thoughts of the 
residents of Gumming. 

For the sake of those involved, 
it is hoped the demonstration 
helped to reform the antiquated 
attitudes of the Forsyth County 
segregationists. If nothing else, it 
reminded the rest of the nation 
that the battle against 
discrimination is not over. 



Kansas 
State 




EDITOR 

Jonie Trued 

managing Km Tim 

Sue Dawson 
NEWS EDITOR 

Erin Eichcr 



EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 

Deron Johnson 
PIIOTO/GRAPIIU'K KD1TOR 

Andy Nelson 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Sheila Hutinett 



mi Mini \l HUlKli Susan Baird, Sue Dawson, Jim Dietz. Erin Etcher, Judy Goldberg, Ron Honig, Pat Mund, 
Lleron Johnswi Jud) l.undstrom, Scott Miller, Andy Nelson, Pilli Paxson. Julie Reynold*, Chris Stewart. Tereaa 
Temme. Jonie Trued Unsigned editorials represent the majority opinion ot the editorial board 

Trie' CHUJ6MN ' W nl ■**' ,s pu°l<sh*d "? Student Publications Inc. Kansas *ate University, daily except 
Saturdays Sundays holidays and University vacation periods ofKIt 'ES are In Uie north wing ot Kediie Hall, phone 
S,T2«S55 SKI tiNIM I.ISS POWTAliE paid at Manhattan. Kan US01 SIBMHIPTION KATrS calendar year, t*>. 
academic year, t3S semester, Bo. summer term, Ho Address changes and letters to the editor should be sent to the 
Kansas Stale Collegian, Kediie MB, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kan 86506 




PATT1 

PAXSON 

Collegian 
(ill urn nisi 



my Tuscan "mama" fed me night and day 
with those little pieces of heaven I call 
"Italian food," so I easily put on 15 pounds 
while a student there. 

While not in school, which, with some 
American ingenuity, could easily total four 
out of seven days a week, I traveled the 
length and breadth of Italy. I experienced 
everything from Venetian glass, to 
Botticelli's "Birth of Venus," to 
Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel, to the ruins of 
Pompeii and the Greek temples of Sicily. 

Ah, and the beauty of the character of the 
Italian people! Meeting and getting to know 
the Italians was the best part of living in Ita- 
ly. Italians are so alive, full of zest and im- 
agination. They truly know how to live life to 



the fullest . The character of the Italian peo- 
ple as a whole is reflected in their artwork, 
their mastery of leatherworking, their 
finesse with food and their perfection of the 
winemaking business 

When I had to leave Italy to finish my 
senior year at home in New York, I was in- 
deed sad to leave, but I brought back with me 
experiences that would continue to help me 
in my dealings with people the rest of my life. 

I found that people are really the same 
everywhere you go. Their color, race or 
religion make no difference as you go from 
country to country and truly study the 
character of the people, I have traveled and 
lived in a few different nations of the world 
and I found this to be true. People 
everywhere love and hate, laugh and cry, 
and hope and dream the same. What makes 
us different are those things that dictate our 
lives — our individual environments. 

When you think "internationally" and 
have experienced "being international," you 
have reached a level of understanding about 
humanity that you otherwise would never ex- 
perience. This is essential to have in today's 
world because geographic boundaries do not 
a people make. And if you are American, it 
should almost be required to have an "inter- 



national experience." Americans have the 
most diverse melting pot of nationalities, but 
they are the least understanding of those na- 
tionalities. 

I know, not everyone can afford to travel 
the world, but Americans are blessed with 
that old "American ingenuity" I mentioned 
before. Those blessed student loans, grants 
and scholarships (for however long Presi- 
dent Reagan will allow us to have them) will 
pay for an education abroad almost as easily 
as it will here in the United States if you find 
the right overseas study program. 

In Eisenhower 14A, any K-Stater can get 
information about overseas study programs. 
It doesn't matter what your major is, 
because I have seen information on pro- 
grams abroad in virtually every possible 
field of study. Or you may save up all your 
electives for your junior year and go to 
Europe or Africa or South America to meet 
your academic requirements. 

Once you've become "international" you'll 
see a depth and beauty in life you have never 
seen before. Understanding the ways of the 
country of that foreign student sitting next to 
you in lab can make a positive difference in 
how you get along with that student and 
others like him or her. 



Letters 

U.S. arms fuel war 

Editor. 

The news of the past months revealed 
more details about the secret arms 
shipments to Iran by the U.S. government 
and Israel. The irony is that the U.S. govern- 
ment has repeatedly branded the rulers of 
Iran as the sponsors of terrorism in the 
region, yet these sponsors of terror received 
U.S. arms from the U.S. government. 

It is well known all over the world that the 
Khomeini regime has expansionist dreams 
in the region. The rulers of Iran provoked the 
armed conflict with Iraq by staging more 
than 941 violations against Iraq during the 
period February 1979 to September 1980. The 
Iraqi government, which sought a peaceful 
settlement of the dispute, protested to the 
Iranian government through the diplomatic 
channels and notified the U.N. Secretary 
General, the Organization of Islamic Con- 
ference, the Non-aligned Movement and the 
Organization of the American States, pro- 
testing the Iranian provocations on more 
than 145 occasions. 

The rulers of Iran are rejecting all calls for 
peace from the U.N. Security Council and 
other international organizations. The U.S. 
government decided to send arms and spare 
parts as a signal of goodwill This action by 
the U.S. government and other countries is 
counter-productive to the cause of peace in 
the region. In fact, the delivery of arms to the 
fanatic Mullahs has encouraged them to con- 
tinue their aggressive policies against Iraq 
and other countries in the Arab Gulf and 
made them persist in their intransigence by 
refusing a cease-fire and a negotiated settle- 
ment of the dispute. 

The Arabs and all the peace-loving people 
in the world share the American people's 
concern over this change in the U.S. policy 
and question the wisdom of such a policy 
which is contrary to the neutrality declared 
by the U.S. government and its alleged at- 
tempt to bring an early end to this bloody 
war. The supply of arms and spare parts to 
the Iranian aggressors will undoubtedly pro- 
long the war and increase the suffering of in- 
nocent victims. The last offensive launched 
by Iran against Iraq, which started Jan. 9, 
1967, is a good indication for that. 

The Iraqi government has made its posi- 
tion clear on several occasions. Iraq has ac- 
cepted all the resolutions of the U.N. Security 
Council and other international organiza- 
tions for an immediate cease-fire and a 
negotiated settlement of the dispute. The Ira- 
qi call for peace and a negotiated settlement 
does not stem from a position of weakness 
The Iraqi army and all the people of Iraq, 
under the leadership of President Sadam 
Hussain, have proven over the past six years 
that they are capable of not only defeating 
the Iranian aggressors who outnumber the 
Iraqis by more than three to one, but also can 
inflict heavy losses on the Iranians. 

Abbas M. Lafta 
graduate in horticulture 

Wrong solution 

Editor. 

H.L. Mencken is reputed to have said: 
"For every problem there is one solution 
which is simple, neat and wrong." In Kansas 
this winter, one solution blowing in the wind 
is capital punishment — the ultimate penalty 
that backfires 

It is more than ironic that the United States 
and the Soviet Union are among the handful 
of nations which still employ the death penal- 
ty. Some claim that capital punishment is a 
society's "mark of compassion for its 
citizens." They forget that violence begets 
violence. 

For taxpayers, the bad news is that the 
death penalty is expensive. The estimated 
cost is $1 million per execution — perhaps 
twice the cost of life-long incarceration, 
which currently costs about f 10.000 a year. 
To set up a death penalty option, indigent 
legal services could cost the state $2.6 
million, according to authoritative 
estimates. County prosecutors would require 
a similar amount 

And for what? To promote a slate-operated 
death industry in Kansas doesn't deter crime 
any more than our current system. At a time 
when our state faces a fiscal crisis so severe 
that essential food, shelter and health care 



are being sharply curtailed to children and 
the elderly? It seems both unwise and unjust 
to set up an expensive way to execute the 
poor on death row while wealthy murderers 
beat the rap. 

If presented with alternatives, such as 
mandatory sentencing for serious offenders 
with no opportunity lor parole, a majority of 
Kansans would not choose the death penalty. 
I urge Collegian readers to write their state 
legislators soon 

Dave Redmon 
instructor of English 

Murder is wrong 

Editor, 

Re: Patti Paxson's column, "Pro: Women 
must be allowed choice," in the Jan. 22 Col- 
legian. As a Catholic, I feel it is my respon- 
sibility to respond to the opinion of Patti Pax- 
son set forth in her recent article. Yet, not on- 
ly as a Catholic, but as a person who believes 
in freedom do I write this letter in response, 

Murder is wrong. It violates the freedom of 
life. It doesn't make the crime less wrong if 
the victim is unable to speak as we speak, 
unable to hear as we hear or unable to do all 
the things we "normal" people are able to 
do. The right to life of a born person who is 
deformed and unable to voice his/her 
defense is not questioned. Nor should the 
right to life of the unborn who are not capable 
of voicing their rights. 

In her column. Paxson states that in the 
third trimester of a woman's pregnancy, 
abortion is not allowed unless the woman's 
life or health is threatened. By this ruling it 
can be assumed that those who made the law 
felt that in the third trimester there is a life 
within the mother's womb Exactly how did 
this life come about, and could there have 
been life at six months and 29 days or is it on- 
ly a life after the full seven months? Life 
begins with the first beat of the heart, and 
this happens long before the seventh month 
— the beginning of the third trimester. 

We opponents of legalized abortion proper- 
ly call ourselves pro-lifers. It cannot be 
reasonably thought that our opposition to 
legalized abortion supports "the murder of 
hundreds of women at the hands of illegal, 
back -alley abortionists," as stated by Pax- 
son, By supporting pro-life does not mean we 
support illegalized abortion. It can never be 
assumed that our hopes of getting a law pass- 
ed banning abortion supports illegal abor- 
tionists as long as they are able to get away 
with it. This is a gross error. 

It is not my idea that pregnancy is "impos- 
ed on women." As Paxson says, the woman 
is in part responsible for the pregnancy. 
Pregnancy is not imposed; it is allowed. If 
the pregnancy is not planned, should the un- 
born baby suffer the consequences? Abortion 
in these circumstances is a way out, an 
escape from responsibility, a solution to the 
"inconvenience" for which the murdered 
baby was never responsible 

To say that after the birth the child will be 
unwanted and uncared for is to say that we 
know the future of the child Who has this 
ability? Children are longed for by those 
unable to have children, and these people 
long to care for these children The suppor- 
ting idea for abortion that Paxson uses of 
already having too much suffering in our 
world is totally irrelevant. 

In support of freedom, of the right to life, I 
write this letter, I urge anyone who now 
believes in the legalization of abortion to 
think about their decision to allow legalized 
murder, because abortion is murder 

Chris Koetting 
sophomore in accounting 

Set record straight 

Editor. 

Usually when I read yet another plea from 
the pro-life activists for everyone to come 
around to the right point of view. I simply ig- 
nore it. After all. I thought this controversy 
was settled years ago. However, a letter to 
the editor by Dan Walter in the Jan. 21 issue 
of the Collegian contained some statements 
which were so ludicrous as to require some 
serious reply 

Walters asserts that a woman may obtain 
an abortion on the day before she would 
deliver that child. I would hope that this is as 
ridiculous to everyone else as it is to me, but 



it is just such hysterical, emotional misinfor- 
mation which fuels the fires of ignorance. 
Therefore, let us examine the Supreme Court 
case on which all the abortion laws are sup- 
posed to be based. 

Roe vs. Wade, Jan. 22, 1973 — in this deci- 
sion, the court declared that a woman has the 
right to choose whether or not she will avail 
herself of an abortion without coercion or in- 
terference from any party, including the 
state, up to the end of the first trimester 0/ 
pregnancy. In the court's opinion, these 
rights are guaranteed under the First, 
Fourth, Fifth, Ninth and 14th amendments to 
the Constitution. 

The court further concluded that there is 
no historical or legal basis for considering 
the unborn fetus to be a person with rights 
under the Constitution. The only basis for 
such a consideration the court was able to 
find, after extensive and exhaustive 
research on the matter, was religious. 

As we all know, religious matters are left 
to the individual in this country, thus it is left 
to the mother to decide whether or not she 
believes the fetus she carries is a person with 
rights After the first three months of the 
pregnancy, when an abortion poses a threat 
to the life of the mother, the state which has a 
vested interest in protecting her life may in- 
tervene in the process. (United States 
Supreme Court Reports, Lawyer's Edition. 
Volume 35: pp. 150-155. Available in Farrell 
Library.) 

I know of no state which permits arbitrary 
abortions beyond the end of the first 
trimester, except in such cases as when the 
carrying of the pregnancy to full term will, in 
the opinion of qualified physicians, endanger 
the life of the mother. 

Now for some propaganda of my own. Pro- 
lifers are so concerned with life. What about 
the quality of life? Forcing unwanted 
pregnancies to term creates a select environ- 
ment for child abuse and neglect. Don't we 
have enough of these tragedies already? 
Making abortions illegal will not stop abor- 
tions any more than prohibition stopped the 
consumption of alcohol. 

It will make abortion elitist; only those 
with the money to grease the right palms in 
the right places will be able to avail 
themselves of abortions. What about popula- 
tion control? There are already too many of 
us on this tiny little planet (with migration to 
another planet not yet assured) and more of 
us every day. Why add the unwanted child to 
the crowd? 

And finally, what about plain old American 
freedom? The government already intrudes 
into too many areas of my life where I 
believe it has no right to be. Roe vs. Wade 
was an important stepping stone in the 
elimination of this unwarranted government 
interference in the privacy of citizens; let us 
not take a step backwards for we have to far 
yet to go. 

Christian J. flowers 
junior in biology 

Kids and coffins 

Editor, 

I wonder what Dan Walter learned in his 
years of study here at K-State. He obviously 
learned how to evoke emotion from the 
public by parading sign-bearing 
kindergarteners carrying a coffin through 
campus. He also learned how to equate stab- 
bing a child to death in a hospital with perfor- 
ming an abortion. 

He didn't learn, however, that by emo- 
tionalizing the issue, that issue only becomes 
harder to resolve. Tactics of this sort serve 
only to cloud people's views of the facts they 
need to solve a problem. 

He apparently failed to realize that with 
his type of campaign, he makes it impossible 
to recognize any gray area between the bat- 
tle lines which have now been drawn. K-State 
evidently also failed to teach him the impor- 
tance of free debate, flexibility and com- 
promise 

I could not support Walter in a campaign of 
such strategy — even if he were marching in 
favor of sliced bread. I can only hope that if 
he insists on dealing with issues in this man- 
ner, his support will dwindle until he mar- 
ches alone. 

Judd Aunts 
junior in mkrobtofctgy 



m - t *<*+ ^ --y^p^wW 



KANSAS STATI COLLEGIAN, Tu— day, Januwy 27, 1SST 



Students eligible to compete for cash, demonstrate safe driving abilities 



By STEVE LAWRENCE 

Colle gian Reporter 

Students will have a chance to test 
their driving skills behind the wheel 
of a 1987 Dodge Daytona Shelby Z 
with the chance of winning a 15,000 
scholarship and personal use of the 
car for one year. 

The National Collegiate Driving 
Championships, sponsored by the 
Dodge Division of Chrysler Motors, 
will be hosted by the K -State chapter 
of the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers March 26-27. 

Students not only learn about the 



importance of using safety restrain 
ing systems but also the dangers of 
drinking and driving, said Sherry 
Ledgerwood, national media direc- 
tor of the NCDC program. 

Ledgerwood said the competition 
is on college campuses because 
statistics show that the 18- to 25-year- 
old age group is most affected by 
drinking and driving problems. She 
said the competition is a way to relay 
the dangers of drinking and driving 
to young adults. 

K-State is the only Kansas school 
scheduled to have the competition. 

"We've been to K-State in the past 



and we always get a good response 
there," Ledgerwood said 

Last year, 502 students par- 
ticipated in the competition at 
K-State, while more than 40,000 par- 
ticipated nationwide, Ledgerwood 
said. 

Mark DeCou, senior in mechanical 
engineering and vice president of the 
K-State chapter of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers, 
said ASME is setting a goal of 500 
students this year. He said the socie- 
ty is working on making the competi- 
tion flow more smoothly this year, 
which will increase student par- 



ticipation. 

The contest challenges students to 
drive a serpentine-shaped rally 
course marked by pylons. The 
drivers are scored by the time it 
takes them to drive the course with 
one second added for each pylon 
knocked down. 

Each school will award one winner 
to be flown to Daytona Beach, Fla., 
to represent their school in the finals 
at the Daytona International Speed- 
way. 

A location for the competition here 
at K-State has not been determined. 

"We're going to try and keep it on 



campus, 

competition was held 
Stadium parking lot. 

"The scholarship goes toward con- 
tinuing the students education," 
Ledgerwood said. Three scholar- 
ships and three Daytona Shelby Z's 
will be awarded at the Grand Finals. 

The first prize in the Grand Finals 
is a $5,000 scholarship and the use of 
a Dodge Daytona Shelby Z for one 
year; second prize is a $3,000 
scholarship and the use of a Shelby Z 
for one year; and third prize is a 
$2,000 scholarship and the use of a 
Shelby Z for one year. Fourth 



Crisis service helps farmers get FACTS 

*** *> ii ■_ ._ 1 : mi mi 1*TV^ k «a«Ia kni.infl 1 1* ill ■ h 1 a 111 tl 



By CHRIS HALL 

Collegian Reporter 



Located in a small room in Waters 
Hall is a service that assists farmers, 
ranchers and agribusinessmen from 
across the state. 

The Farmers Assistance, Counsel- 
ing and Training Service, which 
began operation on July 1, 1985, is 
designed to help the agricultural 
community in avoiding or alleviating 
the problems and stress of the cur- 
rent agricultural economic crisis, 
said Kimberly Williams, family 
therapist and FACTS staff worker. 

The FACTS office maintains a toll- 
free hotline number staffed by pro- 
fessionally qualified specialists and 
supplemented by a statewide net- 
work of cooperating agencies and 
programs capable of providing 
direct assistance. 

Since its beginning, the program 
has expanded, trying to offer more 
services while continuing to main- 
tain the purpose of answering the 
hotline. 

"We now provide a mediation ser- 
vice to the farmers as an option. This 
is where a mediator will sit down 
with a farmer and his creditor and 
they will try to come up with solu- 
tions to the economic problems fac- 
ing them," Williams said. 

The staff of FACTS has grown 
from five employees to 12 in the past 
year and a half. 

The calls coming into the hotline 



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have remained about the same, 
Williams said. 

"People call wanting to know — is 
it getting better, getting worse, or 
plateauing — but we don't know," 
she said. "We also hear — I never 
thought it would get this bad." 

Overall, the program pursues 
three main goals, Williams said. 

The first is to help Kansas 
farmers, ranchers and 
agribusinessmen save the family 
farm or business whenever humanly 
possible. 

The second goal is to help families 
cope with the stress and other pro- 
blems that result from living under 
today's economic conditions. 

And, when absolutely no way can 
be found to save the farm, ranch or 
business, to help families make a 
successful transition to other 
lifestyles. 

FACTS also provides confidential 
information, counseling, assistance 
and referrals for financial and legal 
problems, employment and retrain- 
ing needs, personal or family crisis 
and basic family needs. 

About 10 new callers and 20 repeat 
callers are dealt with each day. 

"I do about three hours of therapy 
a day," Williams said. "Of these 
calls, usually one is someone saying 
they are or know of someone who is 
potentially harmful to themself or 
others." 

Charlene Henton is the hotline's 
family needs specialist. She deals 



with the callers who are having trou- 
ble paying bills and buying clothes 
and food. Many farmers with these 
problems are not eligible for welfare 
or food stamps because land — even 
if it is mortgaged — is considered an 
asset. 

Henton first encourages the 
families to find out if they qualify for 
Social Rehabilitation Services. They 
also may be eligible for commodity 
foods such as honey, rice, cheese and 
flour. These foods are from the 
government and are distributed 
through local organizations such as 
the Veterans of Foreign Wars and 
Salvation Army. 

"Churches are starting to set up 
food pantries, and thrift stores are 
good places to get clothes," Henton 
said. "Some will barter instead of 
charging money. One had a man 
come in and trade a 50 pound bag of 
lima beans for some clothes." 

If the family has children under 5 
or the wife is pregnant, they may 
qualify for the Women, Infants and 
Children program. This is through 
the local Health Department which 
gives vouchers for certain foods, she 
said. 

"Willie Nelson Farm Aid money is 
also available through churches. 
This is a big help for paying utility 
and medical bills. One of the first 
things these people cut is medical in- 
surance and there is a big need for 
money to buy medicine," Henton 
said. 




LAFEMME 

(GYN/FAMILY PLANNING) 

CLINIC 

Available Services: 
* Birth Control Information & Prescriptions 
•Pregnancy Counseling & Referrals 
•Pregnancy Testing 
'Routine Gynecological Exams 
•Self Breast Exam Instruction 
•Sexuality Information 
'Sexually Transmitted Disease Information 
(must come into clinic to make appointment) 

LAFENE HEALTH CENTER 

"Your Medical Facility" 



% 



PROPEL YOUR CAREER TO THE TOP 
IN NUCLEAR PROPULSION. 




Officers in today's Navy develop their lalenis 

working with some of the most sophisticated 
equipment in the world The Navy operates over 
hall of (he nuclear reactors in the U.S. Being the 
hcsl in nuclear engineering takes a lot of talent and 
the hands-on experience the Navy provides 

Ask Randy Summervill. Randy Lewis, or other 
KSU nuclear propulsion officer candidates how 
you can earn $1 ,000 a month starting your junior 
year of college Plus you gel a $4,000 bonus upon 
acceptance and enlistment into the- program, and 
another $2,000 when you complete your Navy 
studies. 

After college graduation, you receive a year of 
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To qualify, you must be working toward, or 
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of calculus and calculus-baied physics with an 
overall GPA of 3 4, Seniors 3 2 (Rehired only 
for nuclear propulsion program). 

Start your career al the top and lead the 
adventure as a Navy Officer Cat! Navy Man- 
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transcripts to: 

NAVY RECRUITING DISTRICT 

2420 Broadway 
Kansas City, MO 64108-2488 



NAVY^ OFFICER. 



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"The people having trouble in the 
rural areas are not only 
geographically isolated, they are in- 
formationally isolated." she said. 
"Our program is here to use as a 
resource, to let them know there are 
opportunities for help and they 
should check them out." 

The program is funded by the Kan- 
sas State Board of Agriculture and 
works in conjuction with the 
Cooperative Extension Service, 
Williams said. 

Williams received a master's 
degree in marriage and family 
therapy from K-State in December 
1986. She has been with the hotline 
since it started. 




Try 
Chiropractic. 

For the 
HEALTH 

of it. 



Call 537-8305 

Dr. Mark Hatesohl 

3252 Kimball Ave. 



Get Personal 

With a Collegian 

Classified! 





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TONITE 

$2.25 Pitchers 
"Quote Nite" 




Best quote of the 

evening receives a 

keg courtesy of 

Southern Sun! 






Last week's winner 

"It takes imelligenct 

to be stupid. " 

—Mare- 






LAFLIPi 

Books fif Copies 

•4« self-service copies 
•Full service copy center 
•Resume service 

OPEN DAILY 
M-F8-9 Sat 9-5 Sun 12-9 

FirstBank Center Denison & Clafltn 

776-3771 



Goodyear tires. 

After one year of use of the Shelby 
Z, the winners can return the car or 
negotiate to buy it, Ledgerwood said. 

The competition will run from B 
a.m. to 6 p.m. March 26-27. 

Any student 18 years old with a 
valid driver's license is eligible for 
the competition. Students from sur- 
rounding universities and colleges 
are also eligible to compete. 

The winner from K-State last year 
was Scott Kirkham. junior in 
business administration. 



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Tuesday 

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Night 

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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tuesday, January 27, 1987 — 6 






UNC grabs 
top ranking 
in AP poll 

By The Associated Press 

Despite winning 15 games in a row, 
many in dominating fashion, North 
Carolina Coach Dean Smith still isn't 
convinced his top-ranked team could 
heat any other team in the nation. 

The Tar Heels, now 17-1 after an 
early season loss at UCLA, returned 
lo the top of The Associated Press' 
college basketball poll Monday, 
replacing Iowa, which held the posi- 
tion for one week. 

"People shoot at you more when 
you're ranked No. 1, but because of 
the parity, that doesn't mean you're 
really any better than the team rank- 
ed 18th," Smith said. 

North Carolina received 59 first- 
place votes and 1,236 points from the 
nationwide panel of sports writers 
and broadcasters to easily out- 
distance the Hawkeyes, who suffered 
I heir first loss Saturday to snap a 
school-record 18-game winning 
streak. 

K-State, after whipping Colorado 
92-61 and losing to nationally ranked 
Oklahoma 81-78, received 18 votes in 
(his week's poll. The 'Cats received 
21 votes in last week's AP rankings. 
Oklahoma vaulted into the top ten 
this week and Kansas regained a 
^pot in the top 20. 

Iowa received two first-place votes 
ind 1.141 points after a week of 
drastic up and downs 

The Hawkeyes beat then-No. 5 Pur- 
due on the road 7W7 and followed 
that with another Big Ten Con- 
ference victory, 101-88 over Indiana, 
the first time a Hoosier team coach- 
ed by Bob Knight allowed more than 
100 points. They couldn't hold the 
iinmecourt momentum, however, as 
i »hio State beat the Hawkeyes 80-76 
.it Iowa City. 

Nevada-Las Vegas. 18-1, received 
the remaining first-place vote and 
! .127 points to take third The Run- 
!»n Rebels, who were fourth last 
( rk, won all three of their Pacific 
i oast Athletic Association games 
ist week. 

Alabama, 15-2, jumped from 13th 
to ninth with 666 points, just one 
more than Oklahoma, 14-3, which im- 
roved one place from last week. 



Men'* Top » 
These are the Top Twenty teams through Jan. 

.1,1 The Associated Press' men's college basket - 

•i.ill poll Kirst place voles are In parentheses, 

tinned by season records, point* and last 

i eek't ranking Big Eight Conference schools are 

m hold late 

2 
I 
4 
3 
i 
7 
I 
6 
IS 
II 

a 
■ 
u 

10 
14 
It 

IS 

17 

IT 

other learns receiving vole* and their points: 
Win ' ■anilina Slate 98, Navy 3S, New Orleans 
H nhm State 28. Kama* State II; Cleveland 
Slale 17. U'LA 16: Virginia IS, Memphis Stale 
M nielli- Tennessee 6; Michigan 5; Providence 
S; Seton Kail 1; Kentucky I; Oregon State 3; 
luls,, .! Arkansas- Little Rock 2: Maris! 2; 
Mnuslim l. Niagra I 



K-State's women recall loss at OSU 



S 1 urrihna 134) 


17-1 


1.2*3 


1 Iowa '2' 


IS-I 


1,141 


i IMA 


IS-l 


1,137 


1 linl i;i n;i 


15-2 


tea 


lie I'lirrJur 


tS-2 


968 


s Svracuse 


17-1 


902 


7 Temple 


1B-2 


781 


a hci'aui 


16-1 


781 


'• Alabama 


15-2 


666 


III. 1 III ,h,,,„., 


14-1 


its 


il (rtwrgeluwn 


14-2 


596 


12. Illinois 


14-4 


S6S 


13 Duke 


14-3 


■M 


14 (Temson 


17-1 


504 


If, SI John's 


13-3 


348 


16 VV 


16-3 


299 


17 Pittsburgh 


14-4 


228 


ik Auburn 


11-4 


196 


IV Florida 


IM 


133 


ill. Kan*a\ 


1J-S 


» 



By CHASE CLARK 
Sports Writer 



Remembering last year's narrow 
defeat to Oklahoma State, K-State's 
women's basketball team — No. 1 in 
the Big Eight Conference race — 



will look for revenge Tuesday when 
the Lady Cats play the Cowgirls at 
Stillwater, Okla. 

"We've got to remember what 
Oklahoma State did to us down 
there last year," said Coach 
Matilda Mossman. "We can't get 



too overconfident with the number 
of games we've won so far and our 
standing in the Big Eight Con- 
ference right now." 

Tip-off is set for 7:30 p.m. and the 
game can be heard on WIBW-radio, 
580 AM. 




Staff/Chris Stewart 



K-State forward Carllsa Thomas needs three rebounds to break the Lady Cats* career record of 783 held by Eileen 
Feeney. who played from 1976-80. Thomas could break the record tonight against Oklahoma State. 



Announcing 

Spring Semester 
Weight Control Classes 

Choose an 8 a.m. or 3:30 p.m. class on 
Wednesdays. First sessions to begin 
January 28th. Classes will meet in 
Dietary Department of Lafene Student 
Health Center. 

Paid student health fees required. 



Hurry, Offer Ends Saturday! 

AL-BASHA sa0 off! 

food <$&y |f 



GREEK & 

MEDITERRANEAN 

537-7533 1 209 Laramie i4^' 

FREE Delivery Qr 

for orders of $10 or more 
after 4 p.m. 






»^~ 






Sale ends January 31, 1987 




SKYDIVE 

Info Meeting Thursday 7 p.m. 

Union 206 

Club Meeting at 7:30 p.m. 

MEMBERS WHO WANT TO 

JUMP THIS SEMESTER 

MUST ATTEND AND PAY DUES. 
Party this Friday— attend meeting for location 



DEADLINE T0DAYI 

Run for a student government posi- 
tion. Elections will be February 10 & 
11. Filing forms may be picked up 
now in SGS office ground floor of the 
Union. Filing deadline is today at 
S p.m. in Holton Hall 102. 





Last year in Stillwater, the Lady 
Cats were defeated when OSU hit 
two free throws with one second left 
on the clock to close the door on the 
Lady Cats 60-58. 

K-State, 15-3 overall, leads the 
conference race with a 4-1 record 
and goes into Tuesday's contest 
with a six-game winning streak on 
the line. 

Oklahoma State is coming off 
consecutive victories against 
Oklahoma and Iowa State. The 
Cowgirls are 12-6 for the season 
with a 3-2 Big Eight mark. 

"They've been playing pretty 
well and I would think their win 
over Oklahoma would help them out 
a lot," said K-State senior forward 
Carlisa Thomas. 

"This game and Missouri are go- 
ing to be the two tough road trips we 
have to get to stay up at the top of 
the Big Eight," she added. 

Mossman said aggressive re- 
bounding will be a key to defeating 
Oklahoma State, and she has the 
ideal player to dominate the 
boards. 



Thomas leads the Lady Cats in re- 
bounding with an average of 9.9 
boards per game. She needs just 
three more rebounds to take over 
the spot as the Lady Cats ' career re- 
bounding leader. In her four years 
at K-State, Thomas has recorded 
781 rebounds. 

Sue Leiding paces the Lady Cats 
in scoring with 15.2 points per game 
but only had 10 points against Kan- 
sas. Not far behind is Susan Green 
with an U.9 points per game 
average and Thomas averages 11.1 
points per outing 

Top scorers for Oklahoma State 
are Clinettc Jordan with 21.5 points 
per game and Jamie Siess 16.5 
points per game. Jordan and Siess 
also pace the team in rebounds with 
9.5 and 6.8 boards per game, respec- 
tively. 

The Lady Cats will wrap up their 
road trip Saturday at Columbia, 
Mo., when they face the Lady 
Tigers in what could be a key game 
in the conference race. Missouri is 
tied for second in the Big Eight with 
a 3-2 record. 



Senior Lady Cats 
making tracks on 
basketball records 



By CHASE CLARK 
Sports Writer 



Making their marks in the 
K-State women's basketball career 
record books are Carlisa Thomas 
and Susan Green — two senior 
members of the Lady Cats basket- 
ball squad. 

Carlisa Thomas, the 5-foot-9 inch 
forward from Jacksonville, Fla., 
has grabbed 781 rebounds in her 
four seasons at K-State and needs 
only three boards to take over the 
top spot as the Lady Cats' career re- 
bounding leader. 

Eileen Feeney, a Lady Cat from 
1976-80, currently holds both the 
career rebounding record (783 re- 
bounds) and the career scoring 
record (1,670 points) at K-State. 
Thomas has averaged approx- 
imately 10 boards a game this 
season and should take over the top 
spot during the Lady Cats game 
Tuesday night against the Cowgirls 
at Stillwater, Okla. 

Thomas, whose main love on the 
court is rebounding, said she has 
strived for the record since last 
season. 

"After they told me how close I 
was after the season last year, I 
made that one of my goals — to be 
the all-time leading rebounder," 
Thomas said. 

Hoping to break the record at 
home in last Saturday's game 
against rival Kansas, Thomas gave 
it her all. But after the game was 
over and the stats were totalled, it 
was discovered she was three re- 
bounds shy. 

"I would have loved to do it at 
home," she said. "I was pretty 
upset, because of that (falling short 
of the record). I had heard the 
game before that I only needed 12 
(boards). I guess I just fell short." 



Thomas is third on the team in 
scoring with 11.2 points per game, 
paces the team in steals with 79 on 
the season and also leads the team 
in the assists department with 87 so 
far this season. 

Even though some of her stats 
don't reveal it, "Carlisa is a very 
unselfish person," said Coach 
' Matilda Mossman. "as you can tell 
by her number of assists and also 
by her number of turnovers. 

"She gets a lot of her turnovers 
simply because she's trying to get 
the ball to someone else for a better 
shot, and quite often they are expec- 
ting her to shoot the ball," 
Mossman said. 

Still, it's the team's performance 
this season and not individual ef- 
forts that Thomas is concerned 
about. 

"I think if everybody can stick 
together and keep their heads in it 
and not get cocky, then we can do 
pretty good," Thomas said. "We 
have the people that want to win 
and as long as we keep that attitude 
we'll be OK." 

Green is also hoping to reach a 
record herself in Tuesday's game. 
She needs three assists to take over 
fourth place in the Lady Cats' 
career assists leaders record book. 

The 5-8 guard from Anthony 
ranks second on the team behind 
Thomas with 2.6 assists per game 
and is the second-leading scorer for 
the Lady Cats, netting 11.1 points 
per game. 

"I think it's a real tribute to 
Susan — first of all because she's 
played out of position every since 
she has been here," Mossman said. 
"She's basically a shooting guard, 
but we have had to play her at point 
quite a bit." 



Panhellenic Council 

announces 

Open Rush 

February 8-23, 1987 

The participating sororities are: 

ALPHA CHI OMEGA 

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA 

ALPHA XI DELTA 

KAPPA DELTA 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 

* Register with Greek Affairs in Holton 
Hall 203 by Feb. 6. 

* $5 Registration Fee 



hsusfa 



■2^ 



., . 



:~* 



m* 



mmm 



KANSAS STATE COU-IQIAN, Tuwday. Jwwry 27, 1M7 






Conference recognizes 
professor's dedication 



Classifieds 



By SALLY NEAR V 
Collegian Reporter 



A K-State professor received an 
award for his involvement in the 
enhancement of multicultural educa- 
tion in professional roles last Friday 
night in Kansas City, Kan. 

James Boyer, professor of cur- 
riculum and instruction and 
specialist in multicultural studies, 
received the Martin Luther King Jr. 
Multicultural Educator Award at the 
third annual Martin Luther King Jr. 
Education Conference. The con- 
ference was hosted by the Urban 
Education Center of Kansas City, 
Kan. 

The award honors a teacher who 
contributes to the broad understan- 
ding of the principles for which King 
lived and died. 

"Dr. Boyer was selected because 
he exemplifies in every day life the 
techniques and philosophies of Mar- 
tin Luther King Jr. and the CUTE 
(Cooperative Urban Teacher 
Educator) program," said James W. 
Abbot, director of CUTE. "He is 
committed to others, is fair and prac- 
tices equity and justice for all " 

The program, based in Kansas Ci- 
ty, Kan., has existed since 1969. The 
program prepares student teachers 
to teach in urban schools and also 
coordinates a master's degree pro- 
gram with K-State. Boyer has been a 



member of the program for 10 years. 

"I think my work was cited 
because of my energies poured into 
the collaboration of urban ex- 
periences for primary and secondary 
teachers," Boyer said. 

Boyer's involvement includes 
numerous efforts within teacher 
training on multicultural education. 
He teaches three courses a year in 
Kansas City. Additionally, he has 
provided similar training to other 
role groups which include the Kansas 
Highway Patrol Training Center, the 
Kansas Social Workers' Group, the 
Educators of the Gifted in Kansas 
and numerous church groups con- 
cerned with equity. 

"I am deeply honored by such an 
award which represents all that I 
focus on," Boyer said. 

David Byrne, dean of the College of 
Education, said he was not surprised 
that Boyer received the award. 

"The award is given with 
reference to the work done by Martin 
Luther King Jr., and there isn't 
anyone that exemplifies those prin- 
ciples more than Dr. Boyer," Byrne 
said. "He has a lifelong commitment 
to freeing people from the effects of 
poverty and discrimination through 
liberation of the mind." 

The citation was presented at the 
annual banquet at the Holiday Inn in 
Kansas City with about 150 people in 
attendance. 



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and UiitU*!. 



Let your 

opinions 

be known 

with a letter 

to the editor 



by Doug & Dick 



TM6 OULV 3€£ *J HERe 
TEW /•fiAArrtS . . rWD 

a? Trt E fjft* &-£ Mf, 
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.MB.T OF PLfta l\ MlftUt", 

ME 60ES TO rfeEl A 
6IRL? 



lJMAT Ei/ElZ hA(>PEA/£7P 
TO Rc.Wi£.S AMD 3XE 
C*6A(fl SOUftLS, LOetE^E 
TUO PEOPLE toOLD MEET 
ffcfi SIMPLE OtfWUfflNMiii? 



A <LO«T 




TMteALLV DRlWK. 
Uf-T TO **OR fUfi? 



Bloom County 



By Berke Breathed 






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if i **f) HIM ""> 

von wfMjf sffl&f/CrWt 

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MANY & i/5 KNOH 45 &£ & ' 
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ftPSOMU i 

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tMi> ffv&e 

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By Jim Davis 



-V 




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■■•<~i^S~ J Ay 


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Peanuts 



By Charles Schulz 



|M TALKING TO THIS 
&RL SEE ,. IT'S PURIN6 
LUNCH PERIOP... 




i'm talking Anp i'm 
talking when all of 
a suppen she sav5 
^'loho are v0u?' 




WHO AM I?.' IVE 

5EEN SITTING IN FRONT 
OF HEKFORTHEUMOLE 
fEAR! HOW CAN SHE NOT 
KN0U) U)H0 I AM ?.'! 




MAYBE 5WE 
KNOWS BUT 
POESr^TCARE 




itfB7U*nr»tiFw.lMB SyndKj^ i* 

■■I HLHI 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 01_ 

MARV KAV Cosmetics -Skin care-glamour prod 
ucts Free facial call Floris Taylor, 539-2070. Handi- 
cap ped accessible [76 H8) 

ASK ME about Mary Kay! Janet Milliden, 539-9469 
(B9-8S) 

CORRECTION 

Daytona Beach 

trip information 

party 

will be 

TONIGHT 

not Thursday 

at Brother's 
6:30 p.m. 

Ski the Summit 
over Spring Break 




4 days of skiing March 17-22 
U4S pet person nh-luiloN inuwottniBiun. 

1 niL'hlv Imljimi; itnJ lill punnl'v 
Fur iiHirc inlitriiuiiKin t.ill Mun Hlujiin 

ji 5W-8300 
PLutc Truvfi Center. Kannait C'n> . MO 

SPRING BREAK Hurry' Limited space available at 
these number one collegiate beach and ski desti 
nations Soutn Padre Island Daytona Beach. 
Steamboat Springs. Miami BeacrvForl Lauder 
dale, Mustang isiandiPort Aransas. Galveston Is 
land and Fort Walton Beach Call Suncnase Tours 
Central Spring Break Toll Free Hoi Line today lor 
inlormatlon and reservations- 1-800 321-691 1 1 
I799B) 



TO GIVE AWAY: 
FREE MONEY 

The $ KOI 7 

Cold Cash Giveaway 

Listen lit KMKF 101.7 FM 



fur detail 



KMQFJOI+ 

THE COMPETITION has arrived! No* available on 
campus — Avon Beauty Products Contact Kara. 
532 3291 183 87) 

Sub of the Week 

SPICY 

The Best Submarine 
Joint in Aggieville 

AL'S DELI 

South of Baskin Robbins 

PEOPLE'S GROCERY Co-op. 8' i Colorado, is open 
lo everyone Wednesday and Friday. 9am -1pm. 
and Saturday. 9 a m -5 pm S39-4B11 IB3 87) 



ATTENTION 



02 



CHOCOLATE. VANILLA strawberry Need 100 over 
weight people to try new improved herbal waigni 
control program with new flavors No drugs, no en 
ercise. 10O% guaranteed Call 776 5114 or 776 
1465 (76-98) 

SKYDIVE 

Info Meeting 

Thursday 7 p.m. 

Union 206 

Club meeting 

at 7:30 p.m. 

Members who want to 

jump this semester 

MUST ATTEND 

AND PAY DUES. 

Party this Friday 

Attend meeting for location 



C rossworct 



Eugene Shcffer 



ACROSS 
1 Fruit 
centors 

s- — 

Women" 
8 Droops 

12 Philip 
pine 
termite 

13 Lubricate 

14 s. ■<■<( coat 

15 Ordinary 
writing 

17 Split 

18 Secreted 

1 9 Like a 
monk, 
often 

21 Narrow 
gashes 

24 Mountain 
lake 

25 Makes 
public 

26 Revolvers 

30 Theater 
sign 

31 Sonata 
movement, 
often 

32 Engineer's 
org 

33 Publicity 
releases 

35 Chancel 
part 

36 Ascend 

37 Swiss 
mountain 
a°ng 



38 Mexican 
dish 

41 Kind of 
exam 

42 Minute 
particle 

43 Tennis 
stroke 

48 Rail bird 

49 Palm leaf: 
var 

50 Central 
American 
tree 

61 Cms and 
Baden 

52 Sweet 
potato 

53 Storm 
DOWN 

1 " — Joey" 

2 Daughter 
of Cadmus 



3 Sun 
bather's 
goal 

4 Spectacles 

5 Frog's 
cousin 

6 < Some in 
first 

7 Experi- 
enced 
workers 

8 Dorothy 
Lamuur's 
garment 

9 Parched 
by heat 

10 " ..— me 
liberty..." 
(Henry) 

II Cutter or 
coaster 

16 Towel 
word 



Soluti on time: 27 mins. 




Yesterday's answer 



1-27 



20 Church 
calendar 

21 Cummer 
in i n (i 

22 Italian 
bread'* 

23 < toe type 

of hone? 

24 Frnnch 
aunt 

26 I In [III' M II 

servant 

27 Employed 

28 The — 
of the 
Rose" 

29 Zoo at- 
traction 

31 Disturb 

34 Theater 
offering* 

35 Fuss 

37 long- 
haired 
ox 

38 Soviet 
news 
agency 

39 Above 

40 Italian 
guessing 
game 

41 Cun game 

44 Chicken 
— king 

45 lawyer's 
org 

46 Egg drink 

47 Ruby or 
Sandra 




CRYPTOQCIP 



1-27 



li K W (j V P W E .1 11 A R T T .1 R H R tj 

A w T V D C V W II C J E HA W D O R 

V P C Y II .1 D L <i R I L A B 

Yesterdays Cryptoquip: TAKERS OLD STORE 
SEEDED ALTERATIONS 

Toi lay's Crypttiquip clue: E equals M 



MERBALIFE INDEPENDENT distributor S«e us tor 
products Cell 776 51 U or 778-1465 <76-9B) 

ENGLAND SCOTLAND, and Ireland tor under 
S1.300 Travel lo Europe tor 11 days, include! air 
(are. meals, sightseeing and lodging Leaving Kan 
sas City May 19 Call right away lor more inform a 
lion S39-2SB3 185 891 



FOR RENT- M ISC 



03 



RENTAL TYPEWRITERS-Correcting and non 
correcting Typewriter ribbons tor sale, service 
available Hull Business Machines. 715 North 
12th, Aggieville. 539-U13 12711) 



Correctable typewriters lor rent on 
a daily, weekly or monthly basis. 
Sec us lor all your typing needs 
77b 9469 

SI I LntVIHIWI Will* acftwi Irnru piist uMici' 

FOB BENT two bedfoom mofcile home 1200 monlh 
plus deposit 537 7822 185-931 



FOB RENT— APTS 



04 



TWO BEDROOM lunury duplex Fireplace garage 
we»t ol campus M50 Call 539-4294 or 776-2536 
I69tl| 

NICE ONE bedroom apartment Water. Irasn two 
thirds gas paid laundry facility Nice lor graduate 
student or couple 1260fmonth 539-2482 alter 4 
p m 178 86) 

FREE RENT in January Large two bedroom nicely 
decorated, dishwasher disposal No pels WOO 
deposit re ou i red 5391465 185-88) 

ONE-BEDROOM two-bedroom apartments, lur 
nished or unfurnished, (new lurmture) IrVeStloop 
area Call 776 9124 |78H| 

TWO BLOCKS west ot campus Quiet well main 
tamed one-bedroom apartment lor mature, non 
smoking individual S216 Lease No pels water 
beds 537 9686 (82 86) 

NEAR CAMPUS at nice, quiet location-two 
bedroom duplet available February 1 S270 Can 
637-0152 (77-881 

TWO-BEDROOM lunury apartment , block Iromcam 
pus Also, five-bedroom house. btocK and one-hall 
liom campus 539-4363 (77 861 

ONE BEDROOM apartment. S205Smoniti Gas heal 
and water included Lease and deposit required 
Call 537 7794 evenings or weekends (78 68 1 

TWO BEDROOM lunury duplex , fireplace garage 
west ot KSU Available now S425 Call 6394294 
(78111 

LARGE TWO bedroom, partially lur nished basemen! 
apart mem close lo campus. 141 1 Vista Lane Own 
entrance no pels parking for two cars Deposit 
plus rent, available now Pay own electricity Phone 
235 3550. Topeka (79-881 



MONT BLUE 
APARTMENTS 
Leasing for June 
•Studio, I & 2 Bedroom 
Apartments 
and Townhouses 
•Close to campus 
5394447 

LARGE. WARM two bedraom apartment, live blocks 
from campus No pets 1300 Can 7760181 I7911) 

ADJACENT TO campus 1224 Benrand Nice two 
bedroom with garage, washer and dryer We pay 
water. Irash Asking S350 Call 537 1745 or 537 
4422 IB290I 

ONE BEDROOM turmshed apartment Dills paid 
537-731 3 or 539 8401 One-nail block from campus 



TWO BEDROOM apartment partially furnished 
close to campus with air conditioning Rent 1255 
Call 636-7253 (83-881 

ONE BEDROOM apartment live minules from cam 
pus 1250 per monlh Call 537 7968 tor details 185 
86) 

SMALL ONE-person apartment of I Denison S)35 
Call 539 9842 or 776 8093 ask lo' Tim i85 88i 

SPACIOUS LIMESTONE one-two bedrooms 1225 
free heat Filth and Osage 4942756 evenings or 
532-6873 Jim (86l 

NEAR KSU quiet, clean one bedroom furnished 
laundry, air conditioning, parking Available June 
1 Call 776 7814 or 539 3803 I86-104I 

OUIET HILLSIDE seltmg Ihird liooi nice older 
home, private nntrance bath kitchenette bed 
room, study room Utilities paid 1180 prefer 
temaieigraduate 776 3454 (85 8S| 



FOR RENT- HOUSES 



05 



TWO BEDROOM lunury duplex, fireplace garage 
west ol KSU Available now 1425 Call 539-4294 
1 781(1 



FOR SALE-AUTO 



06 



1986 FORD Ft 50 4 ■ 4 351 VB 48 supercab Low 
mileage Best oiler 539 7409 181 91 1 

1977 GOLD Volkswagan van Eiceilent condition 
12 300 238 8092 (82 B5l 



FOR SALE-MISC 



07 



EX 60 SILVER Reed typewriter Best oiler 539 7409 
181911 

FOR SALE 40-gaiion fish aquarium comes fully 
equipped For more information, call 776 7845 (81 
651 

KELSET 12chann»i mixer 1470 Mako bass QUIMrl 
1160. Kuslom powr amp 1200. prices negoliable 
776 1925 (83-87) 



'lltm-.fe Ilt.uvt of .'Music 

DOD Effects 



30% Off 



3:7 Pmni/ 



77A-7VSM 



TYPEWRITER SEARS Commentator 1 erase nbbon 
flood condition 1150 53992B1 184-861 

DRAFTING TABLE 42' long while plastic laminate 
top. pencil slop Regular price 1129. Doughl for 
199. yours lor 190 Sorry, no personal checks Less 
than one week old— over budget must sen— extra 
sharp' John 632-208? (84 851 



FOUND 



10 



WOMEN S WEDDING band found by Ackert Hall 
Call 776 2146 after 5 p m to identity (84 861 



HELP WANTED 



13 



PROFESSIONAL COUPLE m Kansas City. Missouri 
seeking person to care for 15 month old Flat laun 
dry and preparation of evening meal Room, board 
salary, phone. TV Plua location Call collect 816 
926-2020 or 816 444 2B85 176851 

EARN 1480 weekly -160 per hundred envelopes 
stuffed Guaranteed Homeworkers needed tor 
company project stuffing envelopes and assem 
bling materials Send stamped sell addressed en 
veiope to JBK Maiicompany PO Box 25-52. Cas 
I aic. California 91 310 1 76 1021 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT at Camp LincoimCamp 
Lake Hubert — Minnesota resident summer 
camps A strong commitment to working withcnil 
dren required, along with activity skills and teach 
tng experience Specific |ob inlormatlon and appii 
cations are available at Career Placement 
Office— Holt I HaM Sign up in advance, for per 
sonal interviews lo be held on campus. Tuesday 
February 3rd and Wednesday, February 4th. 1987 
164 90) 

THE KANSAS Cooperative Extension £ jrvica has an 
opening lor student computer programmers The 
position is tor 20 hours per week, flexible s^hed 
ute Applicants should be familiar with one ot the 
following languages Pascal. C, or PL/I Summer 
employment Is a possibility depending on per 
i or man ce For more information contact Or Steve 
Welch or Mary Knappal 211 Umperger phone 532 
7019 Application blank* an aval table from the 
above individuals or in the Computer Science Ot 
lice and will be taken during business hours 
through February 6. 1967 |63 92) 



AIRLINES. CRUISELINES hinngi Summsr Ca 
Good pay Travel Call for guide cassette newsser 
vice 1 (9161944 4444 Ext »58 176 1351 

NEED EXTRA cash'' Earn ItOOs weekly al home 
Free details' Rush sell addressed stamped enve 
lope Sterling Enier prices Brm 1514 C Manhattan 
KS 66502 (83-87i 

BABYSITTER WANTED for IB month old ou' home 
Monday -Friday, ft- 1 p m Own transportation non 
smoker. Lee school area 639 8349 185 861 



LOST 



1« 



JANUARY 16 N E parking lot -a set ol keys on a 
brass hook It found please can 532 6429 (84 85) 

LOST GOLD chain necklace with angel charm II 
Found please call Debi al 537 1570 (84 881 



NOTICES 



15 



NEED MONEY lor college' Let us match you with 
scholarship and grant money for which *ou can 
qualify For more information write Student f man 
cial Aid Services 1613SW Chelsea Drive Topeka 
KS 66604 182 9)1 

LATE NIGHT 

with 

COLLEGE LIFE 

featuring 

CRAIG 

GREENWOOD 

Tonight at 10 

FarmHouse 

Fraternity 

1830 College Heights 

Sponsored by 
Campus Crusade for Christ 

ATTENTION SCALPERS Need tour KU-KSu basket 
ban tickets i»r February 4 Compan* coming 537 
7087 (83-37i 



PERSONAL 



16 



GUANABANA LOVER CoslaRicasure was tun but it 
was you mat made <r so special Glad you re 
back -DE i85i 

SEEKING LEFT handed male companion with nm 
nose and good teeth tor two day relationship — 
See Kristnn (85) 

TOMY Dawnie -Congrats on Miss Mannattan-K- 

Stale You Ifuly are More ma" Wonderful Love 

You 1 Lee (85 1 
SKYDIVERS KAREN Mike and Ed -Congratulations 

Oh national compel ilion The Parse hole Club See 

Announcements (85i 

TO CuTE blonde >n royal blue coal entering Blue 
mom Han Wednesday about 12 30 Almost ran over 
you in the parking lot and again inside We ex 
changed smiles but would like to meet if available 
reply via personals Dark haired qu^ in gray RY7 
(851 

TO STEPHANIE Oawn with Lo.e Just once m a lite 
time the right one comes along the feeling >s im 
mortal you know thai you belong Just once in a 
1 1 'mi. me you see her honeii lace you lour.n ner 
lOVtrtg ftftrrd row 'eel her warm emp'aoe Just once 
in a lifetime everything leeis right vou see her 
sninmg race and /ou' darknesMurr-sto'iqht just 
once >n a liletime— the) feeing is vj new io say 
three words anrt rp*»*n mem Tne Aords are I Love 
feu IBtj 

THfJA CARRIE D Last night was very special' En 
toy this week' i in so pr-vud of *ou Tnefa Love 
Sam IBS I 

Phi DELfCbns M See you al 'he Union at n 00 we 
will go We nope mat KSU wen i miss your snow 
Smg it nghi the '■rsr time dont lei your house 
down iBSi 

TO DARK haired guy in gray RX7 Am Haltered but 
doni remember you Please introduce vou'seit 
Cute blonde in royal blue coat i85-86i 

SORHY PAUL Fred il wont work Give back or I n 
tell Wilma |B5| 



ROOMMATE WANTED 



17 



MALE ROOMMATE needed -Ac rois slreet From 

campus H35'monlh plus utilities 776-9369 i76 

H) 
MALE ROOMMATES -across slreet tiom campus 

1616 Anderson Three bedrooms 1105'month 

one-ihird utilities 7760827 iBt BSi 

THREE MALES- To share I wo bedroom apartment 
195month plus utilities Home -539 5)96 
work- 776 2340 aMe' 4pm (83 B6i 

NON-SMOKER OWN room neal lo campus Rent 
negotiable 776 3833 belore lorn or after 6pm 
I81B5I 

MALE ROOMMAIE -iwu bedroom lurmshi- I V 
Cain Lane Fireplace Ldil 639 1157 afterBt - 
861 

MALE ROOMMATEiSi wanted lo share as., bedroom 
house Total expense about 1160 per montr '■ 
deposit available now 7769222 i83b7i 

ROOMMATE TO share a two bedroom part i a 
mshed apanmeiit Cose to campus wtthajt 
tionmg rent and ufmties 1160 Caf'539-72' 

m 

MALE ROOMMATE da"ted lo IhaY* hha apartment 
Own room 11S5pe'monlhplusulilit«s 537 4347 

iSMTl 

MALE ROOMMATE across street horn campus at 
1230 Vainer Ground 'loor private 'oom washer 
dryer tireplacB i'.35imon!h p| uS utilities 776 
9369 (84 93. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 10 share very nice Iwo 

bedroom apartment Reasonable rent low utilt 

ties 776 3134 Michene i84 85) 
FEMALE TO snare Iwu bed'oom apartment Lots of 

room' 1130'month -spi't uttlltiM Call 776 5265 

after 6 30 pm (86 8BI 
MALE ROOMMATE wanted 1)33 plus utilities «m 

room ouiet n.cehome 776 1986 Ask For Lee iB5 

88i 
FEMALE ROOMMATE warned- two bedroom apart 

ment For more inlurmanon catl 776 0972 alter 9 

p m iB5-B6l 



SERVICES 



18 



PREGNANT^ BIRTHRIGHT can help Free preg 
nancy tesl Confidential Call 637 9180 103 S 
FourthSI Suite 25 (ilfl 

PROMPT ABORTION and contraceptive services in 
Lawrence 913841 5716 t39tn 

EXPERIENCED TYPIST-H 10'page Disc storage 

teller quality repons thesis etc 532-5961 or 537 

9206 Oor.nda I7B88' 
TYPINGWORD processing Data sheets resumes 

letlers term papers dissertations etc Mrs Bur 

den 5391204 i80 89i 

Couriesv Dc i in nisi ration 

nv Appoiniincnt 
M..1II -S i.m M. r H li,> Saiurd;i> 

tTBtUfXDRmflfT 

MtH Pt)> m/ 776-13 JS 

QUALiT Y TYPING lor 1 1 per page Conlact John , S39 
5B3S (81 901 

MARTIES TYRING Service Word Processor 1011 
Juliette 537 3314 Term papers theses, disserta 
lions Bam to 5pm (S3 851 

READY FOR graduation 1 We compose'tyoe re 
sumes dale sheets and letters Resume Service 
1211 Moro. Aggieville 537 7294 (84 86 1 



WANTED TO BUY 



22 



WANTED JUDO gi suit, call 532 4802 ask for Ri 
chard (84 88) 

THREE JUOOgissiies 3-4 Call 532-2761 IB4 85) 

WANTED TWO tickets KSU-KU game Call 537 
9249. ask for Bruce (66 86) 



KANSAS STAT! COLLEQIAN, TuMttey, JsntMwy 27, 1987 



Stephan 



Continued fro m Page l 

He defended his trip to Georgia, 
saying he considered it important for 
officials to let people know where 
they stand on such a critical issue as 
racial bigotry. 

However, he said his office receiv- 
ed two telephone calls Monday morn- 
ing, both critical of him for going to 



Georgia. He got no calls in support, 
he said. 

"You know you're not going to 
change the minds of those racists in 
Gumming, but you pull together the 
good people to take a stand," 
Stephan said. "I think, in that sense, 
there was a clear message given. 

"I really think the commitment 
has to be made by elected officials. 
They need to be in that front line so 
they really know what the hatred is 
like." 



Fee 



Continued from Page 1 



10-1 1: 

— Shall a fee of $6 a semester for 
full-time students and $3 a semester 
for part-time students be im- 
plemented beginning in the fall 
semester 1987 for the use of scholar- 
ships for non- revenue intercollegiate 
sports? 

— No student monies will be col- 
lected until athletic department of- 
ficials have signed an agreement 
stating the funds will be used only for 
non-revenue sports scholarships, and 
that the full amount of allowed 
scholarships be maintained as long 
as the student fee is being collected. 



— The Student Affairs and Social 
Services Committee shall review 
statements from the University con- 
troller, Financial Aid Office and 
athletic department to ensure the 
terms of the agreement are being 
fulfilled. 

Another constitutional change the 
committee heard was a proposal to 
give more privileges, including 
speaking rights, to Senate interns. 

"This will give them a better sense 
of belonging," said Sally Traeger, 
senior in marketing and Senate 
chairwoman. "They'll feel like 
they're getting what they're putting 
into it." 

Task force members meet at 3:30 
today in the Student Government 
Services office in the Union to 
prepare for first readings in Senate. 



Spend Spring Break on a Cruise Ship 

Isn 1 it time tor something different and out of the ordinary? 
Sail on the Mardi Gras (or 4 days. Enjoy swimming, trap shooting, table 
tennis, golf driving and more! Spend your evenings in the casino, bar, 
discotheque or arcade. The Mardi Gras will dock at Freeport and 
Nassau. The cruise leaves from Ft Lauderdale on Sunday, March 15 
and returns on Wednesday. March 18. Spend the next 2 or 3 days 
experiencing the excitement of — *. 
Ft. Lauderdale. Watch the Col- R| international Tours 
legian for more details or call Jim 



for more details or call 

776-4756 for more information. 



of Manhattan 



LATE NIGHT 

WITH 

COLLEGE LIFE 

Featuring . . . The Comedy 
and Magic of 

CRAIG GREENWOOD 

One hour chocked full of a cornucopia of 
amazing, tantalizing tid-bits of magic, illusion 
and deception. (He might even fool you.) 

TONIGHT AT 10 

FARMHOUSE 
FRATERNITY 

1830 College Heights 

Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ 



UPC 



Bmm? 



r | k-state \nion 

Jupe arts 



Art Rentals 

Cover up that bare wall- 
—come rent an artwork 
from the Union Program 
Council Arts Committee. 
For only $1-$4 you can 
hang a reproduction of a 
fine painting in your own 
home for the entire spring 
semester Come browse 
and rent— today and 
tomorrow, January 28 in 
the K-State Union Cour- 
tyard from 10 a.m. -3 p.m. 
KSU ID required- 



Hostages 

Continued from Page I 

Prime Minister Rashid Karami's of* 
fice a few blocks from the store to 
protest the weekend kidnapping of 
the four teachers. 

The American educators were 
Alamt Steen, 47, of Areata, Calif., an 
instructor in communication arts; 
Jesse Turner, 39, of Boise, Idaho, 
visiting professor of mathmatics and 
computer science; and Robert 
Polhill, 53, of New York, a lecturer in 
accounting. The Indian was 
Mithileshwar Singh, a visiting pro- 
fessor of finance who is a U.S. resi- 
dent alien. 

Moslem and Christian Lebanese 
professors at the college led the 
demonstration, in which students 
held posters bearing a single word: 
"Why?" 

Universities and nearly all high 
schools joined in a one-day suspen- 
sion of classes. Beirut University 
College said its classes would remain 
suspended until the teachers return- 



ed. 

"The abductions have crippled our 
institution. Each of the victims 
teaches four to five courses at least," 
said a college official, who spoke on 
condition of anonymity. 

Ferial Polhill, 45, a Lebanese, ap- 
pealed to the captors to give her hus- 
band medicine. "Please treat him 
well. Robert is diabetic," she said. 

The Christian-owned Voice of 
Lebanon radio on Sunday said two 
anonymous callers claimed the kid- 
nappings on behalf of the Organiza- 
tion of the Oppressed on Earth, a 
group of pro- Iranian Shiite Moslems. 
The calls could not be authenticated. 

The callers threatened to kill one 
or more captives unless West Ger- 
many released suspected Lebanese 
hijacker Mohammed Ali Hamadi or 
if the United States provided support 
for Iraq, at war with Iran since 
September 1980. 

Hamadi was arrested in 
Frankfurt, West Germany, on Jan. 
13. The United States wants him ex- 
tradited to face charges of air piracy 
and murder in the June 1985 hijack- 
ing of a TWA jetliner to Beirut in 



which a U.S. Navy diver was killed. 

In London, the Church of England 
said Monday that Waite was in "good 
hands" and pursuing his negotia- 
tions. 

He was believed to be conducting 
secret talks with Islamic Jihad, cap- 
tors of Terry Anderson, chief Middle 
East correspondent for The 
Associated Press; and Thomas 
Sutherland, acting dean of 
agriculture at the American Univer- 
sity of Beirut. 

There was no word Monday on the 
activity of Bernhardt Fischer, a 
West German believed to be an 
emissary of the Bonn government 
who arrived at the Defense Ministry 
on Sunday. 



f KSU Horsemen's 
Association 
meeting TONIGHT 

7:30 p.m. 
in Call Hall Rm. 204 



Collegian Classifieds 
Cheap, but Effective 



Enjoy smooth, creamy 

Frozen Yogurt 

that tastes like Ice Cream 
but with 80% less fat! 

FREE SAMPLES - 




OPEN: 11 a.m. 11p.m. Doily 

Noon 1 1 p.m. Sundays 
Nautilus Towers -Aggie villa 



THE ICE CREAM 
* SOCIAL 

\ (WE'VE 
J MOVED 

to 

1439 Anderson 

Student Services Center 

Stop By And 
Sec Our New Store! 

537-7079 




BURGER ^ 



BASH 

Every Tuesday 4-7 p.m. 

25C 
H.P. Burgers 

All You Can Eat 

COTTON 
OWE 

^4|X Poyitl/. I) AiUnwtl^- 

Oram 1 1 n A O 



A PHI ALPHA THETA LECTURE 

"George Armstrong Custer 

and lire Bat lie of the Little Big Horn." 

Delivered B\ 

Joyce Thierer 

An binpttiyov nl die Custer Nuimtuil Battlefield in 1^X4 

Tuesday. January 27. IMH7 Union 2(W. 3:30 p.m. 




mm 




Kansas State University 

and 

Univ. of Calif.— Santa Barbara 

present 

5 Actors From The 
LondonStoga 

appearing for 

5 Exciting Days 



Wed., Jan. 28 

Trevor Baxter 

in W.H. Auden's 
"The Sea And The Mirror" 
Wareham Theatre— 8 p.m. 

FREE ADMISSION 

Thurs., Jan. 29 Fri. & Sat. -Jan. 30 & 31 
Pinter This Evening The Tempest 

Readings from Harold Pinter's plays by William Shakespeare 
Nichols Theatre McCain Auditorium 

8 p.m.-$5/$3 8 p.m -$8/$4 




For Tickets Call 

532-8396 

Mon.Fri. 12-5 p.m. 



Kansas 

Committee for the 
Humanities 

AtliMtr of the Njtio»v*i Lndovmciil lot the Hum*«iitl*l 





The 
Better 
Ball Point Pen 89' 



Whatever the assignment. Pilot has the formula 
Cur writing comfort and precision. 

Pilot's Better Ball Point Pen, in medium and fine points, 
lets you breeze through long note-taking sessions. In fact. 

we've made writer's fatigue a thing of the past! This crystal barreled 
veteran of the campus has a ribbed ringer grip for continuous comfort 
and is perfectly balanced for effortless writing. Best of all, you'll never 
throw it out because it's refillaNe 

The perfect teammate to the Better Ball Point Pen is Pilots 
Pencilier 0.5mm mechanical pencil. It has a continuous lead feed 
system and a cushion tip that helps eliminate the frustration of lead 
breakage. The Pencilier's jumbo eraser does the job cleanly while 
the ribbed grip offers the same comfort as the Better Ball Point Pen, 

Pick up the Pilot Team at your campus 
bookstore today., The Better Ball 
I'oint Pen and The Pencilier. 



[PILOT 



Tuesday, January 27, 1987 

information UPC events, call 532-6571. 



UPC 



^ C> SKI YOUR H€dRT OUT ^ . 
WdRM€R PhRK f€D. 14. 1987 1 13. 50 



Includes it l rcii til. rtfrelfawnll. inrj ho* -to 
denonstraUun by an experienced teacher. 

ttsse: l?;00 won - S:M PH 



Um, n - Feb, 12, i»b; 

Union Mm ties Center 

Jen, t'6: Sign -up lor r-iutt Undents only 
Jin. ."J - Feb. 1): iiudeiui end Centre I Public 



INFO MEETING 

Tonight Jan. 27 
Union Rm. 208 ~ ^ 
7 p.m. ^ 



SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL 



The Franco Zeffiretti directed 
adaptation of the Shakespearean 
tale of tow. marriage, and 
equality. Trie film stars Eli- 
zabeth Taylor and Richard Bur- 
ton. 

Today 7 p. m. . Forum Halt, 
$1 .75 admission. 



o 



o 



/S 



The Taw me 



EXHIBITS 

*'The Patterns of My Home" by Ann 
Carter. January 26 through February 6, 
Second Floor Showcase, K-State Union. 
"Retrospective Prints and Lithographs" by 
James Butler, K -State Union Art Gallery, 
February 2-20. 



Photography Contest 



Enter the 12th Annual UPC 
Photography Contest 

Information and contest rules 
available now in the Union 
Activities Center, 3rd floor, 
K-State Union. Entries accep- 
ted starting Monday, February 
16-Friday, February 27. Cash 
prizes will be given. 



GET INVOLVED ON CAMPOS WITH THE ONION PROGRAM COUNCIL 

Volunteers Wonted: Individuals interested in serving lor the 87 88 year as committee chairs to coordinate 
social, recreational, educational and cultural programs for the benelit of the KSU community. 
Union Program Council is a student volunteer organization consisting of approximately 100 students who 
select, plan and promote 500 programs (films, trips, entertainers and more) each academic year. UPC is 
broken up into nine committees: Promotions, Travel. Special Events. Outdoor Recreation. Kaleidoscope 
Films, Issues and Ideas, Feature Films, Eclectic Entertainment. Arts 

President— Presides over Ihe UPC Eseculive Council, tils on (he Union 
Governing Board, t coordinates event* and activities thai involve Ihe total UPC 
membership Our highest leadership positron 

An, — Coordinates Onion An Gallery eNhibilors. print sates, art rentals. Ihe 
Arts and Cratts Sale. Ihe Photo Contest and Mid Day Arti 

Eclectic Entertainment— Provides the best in live entertainment, professional 
comedians, singers and student entertainment. 

Issues and Ideas- Seiec is, organises and publicises lectures highlighting 
current events or popular topics of interest Organises the Let » Tain About 
II series 

Kaleidoscope Films— Selects and publicises innovative, artistic and interna 
tional films on Wednesdays and Thursdays in the Union Thev also show 
weekend maimers and midnight films 

Outdoor Recreation— Of lets a wide variety of outdoor related trip* and 
programs based on a cooperative wilderness adventure structure 

Travel— Coordinates and publicises winter and spring break trips lor the 
K State community Sells an International Student ID card and maintains a 
Travel Resource Center 

Feature Films— Selects and oubliettes popular films even/ Friday and 
Saturday night In the Union. They also show weekend melinees and midnight 
films 

Special Events— Selects coordinates and pubheurs desired events or 
activities that do not fall under another committee area, including dances, the 
Activities Carnival Late Night »r Ihe K Slate Union and some type* of live 
entertainment 

Promotions— OeaV with the visual image of the entire council. Pastes up 
Collegian ads. p. -ishes the Programmer calendar and other publications 
to promote UPC 

sssssssssssssssssssssV a^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H^^^^MI 



OF THE SHREW 



Applications for Leadership (Committee Chairs) 
are now available. Deadline: 4 p.m. Friday, 
February 6th. 

Applications may be picked up and submitted in 
the Activities Center, 3rd floor of the K State 
Union. For more information, call 532-6571. 



It rtsssf-j wsjon 



MACBETH 

This is director Roman Polans- 
ki's adaptation of the great 
Shakespearean tragedy. It con- 
tains all the classic tragic ele- 
ments of murder, guilt, and 
revenge. 

Wednesday, January 2fi, 
7:30 p. m. . Forum Halt; & 

Thursday. January 29, 

3:30 p. m. . Little Theatre 

& Forum Halt, 7:30 p.m.; 

$1. 75 admission. 



W 



restate ujiiQD 

,'upe kaleidoecopa 






- » . . ^^ 



ht\ t i***m 



mrm 



• 



Inside 




Fine Wine 



Wine snobs would rather 
you not know how easy it is 
to choose and appreciate 
good wines. See Page 7, 



Weather 






\7 


Partly Cloudy 


Partly cloudy and 
windy today, high 45 
to 50. Winds southerly 
increasing to 15 to 25 
mph and gusty. 



Spo 



. . 



- 



■ " j ,-,t i 




«nmmi paitle 

Third Floor Marlatt tops 
First Floor Moore, 52-34, in 
intramural basketball ac- 
tion. See Page 11. 



Kansas 
State 



Kansas State University 




Wednesday 

January 28, 1987 



Manhattan. Kansas 66506 



Volume 93, Number 86 



Reagan regrets arms deal, sets term agenda 



By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - President 
Reagan told the nation Tuesday 
night that he now regrets his failed 
risk in selling arms to Iran but, 
despite the continuing furor, "will 
not sit idly by if our interests and our 
friends in the Middle East are 
threatened," 

He said he did not want to see an 
America that had become "so 
obsessed with failure that we refused 
to take risks that could further the 
cause of peace and freedom in the 



world." 

The president delivered his sixth 
State of the Union address as the 
Pentagon shifted its overseas naval 
forces in what one source described 
as a response to recent hostage- 
takings in Lebanon. 

Reagan said relatively little about 
the situation in Lebanon and used the 
bulk of his remarks to lay out the 
agenda for the last two years of his 
presidency. 

In introducing wide-ranging 
remarks involving America's com- 
petitiveness overseas, its relations 



with the Soviet Union and its budget 
problems at home, he said, "Now, 
ladies and gentlemen of the Con- 
gress, why don't we get down to 
work?" 

Democratic congressional leaders, 
responding to the president in their 
own televised remarks, said they 
were willing to cooperate with 
Reagan, but that he must first 
answer questions about the sale of 
arms to Iran and whether he intend- 
ed to swap arms for hostages. 

"The administration's recent deal- 
ings with Iran have cast a long 



shadow over this country," said 
Senate Majority Leader Robert C. 
Byrd of West Virginia. "The sale of 
arms to Iran — in direct contradic- 
tion to our stated foreign policy — 
raises real questions about trust." 

"The administration has the 
obligation to tell the American peo- 
ple exactly what led to the arms-for- 
hostage deal — and what happened 
to accountability in the White 
House," Byrd said. 

The president's speech was broad- 
cast live from the chamber of the 
House of Representatives before a 



joint session of Congress. Smiling 
and looking fit. Reagan was applaud- 
ed warmly as he returned to the 
public eye after a month's absence 
following the holidays and recupera- 
tion from prostate surgery. 

The House chamber was dotted 
with Nancy Reagan's favorite color 
— red. But his wife, sitting in the 
gallery, chose to wear purple for the 
speech. 

Reagan said it was not wrong to try 
to establish contact with a nation of 
strategic importance and "certainly 
it was not wrong to try to secure 



freedom for our citizens held in bar- 
baric captivity.** 

He added, "But we did not achieve 
what we wished, and srious mistakes 
were made in trying to do so." 

Reagan said his administration 
had made progress on many fronts 
but "I have one major regret. 

"I took a risk with regard to our ac- 
tion in Iran. It did not work and for 
that I assume full responsibility," 
Reagan said. 

While mentioning mistakes, 

See ADDRESS. Page 12 



Athletic fee task force 
accepts $6.50 proposal 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 



Scratch the $6-a-semester athletic fee. It 
went up Tuesday to $6.50. 

Five of the nine Athletic Fee Task Force 
members put their signatures on the revised 
bill during the group's final discussion before 
the "Non-Revenue Sports Scholarship Fee 
Referendum Proposal" proceeds to Student 
Senate for first readings Thursday. 

Sponsors are Doug Folk, task force chair- 
man and junior in electrical engineering; 
Roger Haymaker, junior in business ad- 
ministration; Jennifer Leeds, sophomore in 
political science; Steve Ligon, senior in 
animal sciences and industry; and Sandy 
Marin ugh, sophomore in business ad- 
ministration. Becky Svaty, sophomore in 
education, is also expected to sponsor the 
bill 

A survey to determine students' attitudes 
toward all fees was abandoned when Leeds 
told the group she had received only 50 of the 
500 questionnaires. 

"I don't think the survey is really going to 
affect anything at this point," Folk said. 



One problem with the $6-a-semester pro- 
posal was that, based on fall 1986 enrollment 
figures, the monies generated would not be 
enough to fund 40 percent of the 89 scholar- 
ships currently allowed non-revenue sports 
by the National Collegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion, as was decided last week. 

Full-time student enrollment last fall was 
13,754, while part-time enrollment was 3,933, 
said Kelly Lamborn, senior in journalism 
and mass communications. Using those 
figures, a $6 fee would raise about $165,000 
annually from full-time students and a $3 fee 
would generate nearly $24,000 a year from 
part-time students, for a total of $188,000. 
That figure is short of the $193,000 previously 
anticipated. 

"The $6 fee isn't going to cut it," Lamborn 
said. "Theoretically, it isn't accurate." 

The revised $6.50 full-time student fee and 
$3 part-time student fee, based on fall 1986 
enrollment figures, would generate over 
$193,000 annually. 

Folk said he was concerned about the 
$3-a-semester fee for part-time students. 

See FEE, Page 12 



Enrollment reduction likely 
if Congress passes aid cuts 



By PATH PAXSON 
Collegian Reporter 



A cut in federal student aid could drastical- 
ly reduce K-State's enrollment and force 
students to work full time while attending 
school. 

"If this were to go in effect (proposed cuts 
in federal student aid), close to 30 percent of 
our students would not be able to be in 
school," said Larry Viterna, director of Stu- 
dent Financial Assistance. 

Moreover, if Congress approves President 
Reagan's proposed cuts in financial aid, the 
late 1980s could very easily find students hav- 
ing to work full time and going to school only 
part time, Viterna said. 

Currently, about 65 percent of students at- 
tending K-State receive financial aid, he 
said. 

According to Reagan's recently submitted 
budget, student aid would be cut by 45 per- 
cent for fiscal year 1988 — almost $2.42 
billion less than what was requested for 



fiscal year 1987. Therefore, many students 
would have to consider giving up their full- 
time student status and find a job, Viterna 
said. 

According to a recent article in "The 
Chronicle of Higher Education," the ad- 
ministration's plan would "eliminate grants 
to all but the neediest college students and 
require the remainder of those who need 
financial help to borrow more and pay higher 
interest rates than students pay now. Several 
other higher-education programs, including 
money for facilities and graduate students, 
would be abolished." 

"It's especially going to be hard on the 
single parent," Viterna said of the effect of 
the proposed financial aid cuts 

Though it's not quite time to panic over the 
possible loss of student funding, Viterna said 
students still need to be very concerned with 
the proposal. 

"Reactions from members of Congress 

See AID, Page 12 




Protest group 
demonstrates 
in peace vigil 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 



SiaH/Greg Vogel 

Charles Perkins, left. Manhattan, holds an an tf -Contra banner in front of the Manhattan Post Of- 
fice while Dr. Sam Lacy. Manhattan, passes out literature during a vigil Tuesday protesting 
President Reagan's support of the Contra s in Nicaragua. 



A peace vigil staged Tuesday in 
front of the Manhattan Post Office, 
500 Leavenworth St., turned out to be 
exactly that — peaceful. 

Post office patrons barely gave a se- 
cond glance to the group of about 15 
who quietly distributed a brief state- 
ment explaining their position and 
displayed a banner that read "17,000 
Nicaraguans killed within the last five 
years." 

Sponsored by the Manhattan Pledge 
of Resistance, the vigil was conducted 
in protest of President Reagan's pro- 
posed request for increased aid to the 
revolutionary Contras in Nicaragua. 

The Manhattan Pledge of 
Resistance is a chapter of a national 
movement aimed at stopping the war 
against Nicaragua, said chapter 
President William Draves. Manhat- 
tan. 

The organization has several 
chapters in Kansas, and many have 
been conducting similar vigils in 
Wichita and other cities, Draves said. 

The purpose of the demonstration 
was to illustrate that the majority of 
Americans are opposed to Contra aid, 
Draves said. 

"We feel the war is both wrong and 
unwinnable, and that peaceful 
negotiations are the way to go," he 
said. 

Draves said two-thirds of 
Americans already oppose aid to the 
Contras. 

"We're not trying to convince Kan- 
sans — we're trying to tell 
Washington," he said. 

The official total of Nicaraguans, in- 
cluding Contras, killed in the war in 
the past five years is 17,000, said John 
Exdell, member of the group and 
associate professor of philosophy. Ex- 
dell was one of the 17 Kansans who 
recently accompanied Rep. Jim Slat- 
tery, D-Kan., on a tour of Central 
America. 

Before the trip, Exdell said Slattery 
was regarded in Congress "as a 
potential swing-vote." Now, however, 
Slattery will probably never support 
Contra aid, he said. 



Nation commemorates anniversary of Challenger tragedy 




im aw photo 

The space shuttle Challenger exploded 73 seconds into night one year ago to- 
day, killing all seven astronauts aboard and stunning the nation. 



From Staff and Wire Reports 

NASA workers wQl observe 73 
seconds of silence, schoolchildren 
will launch a small rocket, and a 
statue made partly from donated 
pennies will be dedicated today as 
Americans recall the Challenger 
disaster one year ago 

Relatives of the seven shuttle 
astronauts will mark the sad an- 
niversary by joining in public 
memorial services or grieving 
privately But the family of Ellison S. 
Onizuka plans a happier observance 
on Saturday, gathering in Houston 
for a Hawaiian-style luau. 

"We promised Ellison a luau when 
he got back, with some of his friends, 
and the luau never occurred," said 
Claude Onizuka, his younger 
brother. "So we made a promise to 
the NASA people that on the one-year 
anniversary we'd come back and put 
that luau back on." 

On Tuesday, the astronauts' 



families issued a joint "Letter to 
America" in which they said they 
would raise money for space learn- 
ing centers around the country, 
"places where children, teachers, 
and citizens alike can touch the 
future." 

Some ceremonies were scheduled 
to coincide with the time on Jan. 28, 
1986, that Challenger lifted off from 
Launch Pad 39B 

Just 73 seconds later, the shuttle 
exploded, killing mission com- 
mander Francis R, Scobee, pilot 
Michael J. Smith, teacher Christa 
McAuliffe, Hughes Aircraft industry 
engineer Gregory Jarvis and crew 
members Judith A, Resnik, Ronald 
E. McNair and Onizuka. 

Many observances are scheduled 
in schools, since children across the 
country, planning to take part in 
McAuliffe's lessons from space, wat- 
ched the tragedy on televsion, 

Manhattan Mayor Rick Mann 
declared today "Reach for the 



Stars" day in honor of all astronauts 
killed in the NASA program. 

Manhattan Middle School will have 
special homeroom activities in 
memory of the Challenger accident, 
and several students were chosen to 
participate in a paper airplane con- 
test, said William Warner, eighth- 
grade science teacher at the middle 
school. 

The National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration sent packets 
with suggestions on how to handle 
the observance in schools to all 
teachers who applied for the citizen- 
in-space program, he said. 

Warner and Nancy McClanathan, 
reading and global issues teacher at 
Manhattan Middle School, were two 
of several Manhattan applicants for 
the citizen-in-space program. 

Warner said if he was given the 
chance to go on the shuttle again, he 
would take it. 

"I'm sure NASA is safe overall," 
he said. 



McClanathan agreed with Warner 
and said she would still be willing to 
apply for the program. 

In Los Angeles, 800 elementary 
pupils on Tuesday released colorful, 
helium-filled balloons and laid paper 
flowers at the base of a mural 
painted in memory of the crew. 

"We must always reach for the 
stars by always doing our best," said 
Emmanuel Munoz, 11 -year-old stu- 
dent body president. 

NASA, at its 10 centers, will 
observe 73 seconds of silence today 
at the launch time of 11:38 a.m. 
Flags will be lowered to half-staff, 
and President Reagan will address 
NASA employees by a satellite 
television hookup later in the day. 

There also will be a moment of 
silence at the Seattle Center Flag 
Pa vi! lion , in the shadow of the Space 
Needle; at Morton Thiokol's 
Wasatch Operations in Utah, where 

See SHUTTLE, Page 12 



T— 0m 



KANSAS STATS COLLBOIAN, W.tJn.ad«y , 



2t, 1SS7 



Briefly 



INTERNATIONAL 

Military, rebels clash in Manila 

MANILA, Philippines — Government troops and supporters of Fer- 
dinand E. Marcos clashed outside a walled television station where 
mutinous soldiers held out Tuesday after President Corazon Aquino 
announced she crushed their revolt. 

The coup attempt was the most serious effort by disgruntled 
soldiers to grab power since Aquino became president in February. 

More than 160 rebel soldiers, about 50 pro-Marcos civilians and a 
few police held the complex housing Channel 7 and radio station 
DZBB. It was taken over in a pre-dawn coup attempt that included 
attacks on five military garrisons in which one rebel was killed and 
16 were wounded. 

Defense Minister Rafael Ileto said 271 conspirators had been ar- 
rested and at least 70 remained at large. 

Military chief Gen. Fidel V. Ramos said the mutineers were sup* 
porters of ex-president Marcos who wanted to destabilize the country 
before Monday's nationwide plebiscite on Aquino's proposed constitu 
Hon, which guarantees her a six-year term. 

About 300 Marcos supporters gathered on EDSA boulevard late 
Tuesday near the broadcast center, where they built bonfires, hurled 
stones at police and shouted. "We want Marcos, we want Marcos." 

Troops fired tear gas and smoke bombs at the crowd several times. 
The crowd fell back, only to regroup and continue taunting police and 
troops. Reporters saw at least six Marcos loyalists taken into 
custody. 

Soviets continue space programs 

MOSCOW - In the year since space shuttle Challenger's explosion 
halted manned U.S. space exploration, the Soviet Union has forged 
abend with an ambitious program of endurance missions, space con- 
struction and inauguration of a second orbiting station. 

While failures in the Kremlin's space program have often gone 
unreported, 1986 appeared to be a successful year. The state-run 
media have predicted 1987 will be another busy one, beginning with a 
mission to the new Mir space station. 

No date for the launch has been announced, but the Tass news 
agency reported Jan. 16 that the Progress-27 cargo vessel had been 
sent to the Mir station to take fuel and supplies for a manned mission 
to begin soon. 

REGIONAL 

Senate begins work on liquor bill 

TOPEKA — The Senate Federal and State Affairs Committee 
began work Tuesday on drafting a proposal to overhaul the state's li- 
quor laws and implement the liquor-by-the-drink amendment approv- 
ed by voters in November. 

Sen Ed Reilly Jr , R-Leavenworth, chairman of the committee, 
said he hopes to have a bill ready by the end of this week and plans 
to hold only one day of hearings next week. 

Although the committee took no formal action on a set of recom- 
mendations from the Kansas Liquor Law Review Commission, 
members did discuss proposals to include in a liquor-by-the-drink 

bill. 

Reilly said he wants to draft a "clean" bill designed only to put the 
constitutional amendment allowing the sale of liquor by the drink in 
public places into effect. Other changes should be handled in 
separate legislation to make it easier to get the liquor-by-the-drink 
bill through the Legislature. 

Reilly said he expects the Senate to act quickly on the measure, 
although he expects slower going in the House. 

"Obviously, this is not going to pass quickly." Reilly said, 
isn't going to be a perfect piece of legislation." 



'This 



K . ,; 






is Bd 
X390 



Dog Days Spectaculars! 

sJ^S^ Compact Discs 

$13.98 

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 



By The Associated Press 



NATIONAL 

Inmates set fires, fight in prison 

PITTSBURGH - Inmates evacuated from their cells because of an 
accidental fire set blazes throughout the prison Tuesday, battled 
guards and each other and then barricaded themselves inside an 
auditorium where they started ■ major fire, authorities said. 

At least 25 inmates and three guards were injured from fighting or 
suffered smoke inhalation in-fore all the fires were extinguished, said 
Thomas Seiverling, spokesman for the Stale Correctional Institution 
at Pittsburgh, also called Wfstwrn Pen. 

All the inmates were stripped, searched and returned to their cells 
by early afternoon, officials said. 

A fire official said bricks were hurled at firefighters from an out- 
door exercise yard where guards had held 700 to 800 inmates, many 
dressed in bedclothes, for eight hours in 4 degree cold after the first 
fire broke out in a storage area 

"There was nothing easy about today," said the fire official, Assis- 
tant Chief Charlie Dickinson. 

There was no indication that the disturbance was planned or tn any 
way a direct result of conditions at the 105-year-old, maximum- 
security prison. About 1,600 inmates are crowded into two main 
cellblocks designed to hold 1,100, Seiverling said. 

"It appears the initial fire was an accident," he said. "Some in- 
mates were willing to take advantage of the situation." 

The prison, built in 1882, is undergoing a $20 million renovation, in- 
cluding the construction of new cell blocks. 

Navy moves into Mediterranean 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan administration has ordered the 
Navy to extend the deployment of the aircraft carrier John F. Ken- 
nedy in the Mediterranean Sea. 

The move maintains two carrier battle groups in the Mediterra- 
nean indefinitely, the Pentagon said. 

Informed sources who asked not to be named said the order was 
issued as a precaution in response to the recent wave of hostage- 
taking in Lebanon and reports that Anglican church envoy Terry 
Waite was missing. 

A source, who spoke only on condition of anonymity, stressed Tues- 
day the Navy had not been given any instructions to prepare for a 
military strike in Lebanon or elsewhere. But the source agreed the 
two carriers would begin moving eastward toward the Middle East 
"as a precaution, to be prepared for any contingency." 

The sources also disclosed that the Navy had issued orders to its 
Mideast Task Force to move some smaller warships deeper into the 
Persian Gulf The Navy has no carriers in the region, but does have 
five smaller combat ships assigned to the gulf. 

The order to the ships in the gulf was described as a U.S. sign of 
support for the Organization of Islamic Conference that got under 
way Tuesday in Kuwait. The conference opened despite vows by pro- 
Iranian terrorists to disrupt it. 

PEOPLE 

Liberace's illness linked to anemia 

PALM SPRINGS, Calif. - Liberace is gravely ill with anemia, em- 
physema and heart disease, a publicist said Tuesday, one day after 
his manager denied a report he had AIDS and insisted the pianist 
simply was anemic from dieting 

The flashy 67-year-old showman, known by the trademark 
candelabra atop his piano, was under the care of doctors at his home 
here, according to a statement issued by publicist Denise Collier in 
New York. 



SAFEWAY 



222 N. Sixth 
3011 Anderson 
(Village Plaza) 



New Store Hours 

7 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

7 days a week 



OFFER GOOD 
1/28-2/3 

Ground Beef 0ftiIt .. 

5 lb. chub pack OW ID. 

El Toro Burritos . /C1 

Assorted varieties 4/$ 1 

Sunkist Navel Oranges ic/cn 

Coors 6 pack M A(k 

Regular and light ^t-ISI 



Campus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

I -LEARN is looking for a lew good volunteers 
for this spring Don't waste away the spring hours 
- be ■ U-UarN volunteer Cot! MZ-8442 or stop 
by Holton Hall 02 

M.PHA MU ALPHA: AJ1 resumes are due Fri 
day and member* should contact Teresa 
Ijpighty Also, there will be a field trip Friday lo 
Hallmark Members should cnnlacl Angie 
Rowland II interested 

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT is 
now posting sign up schedules (or on -cam pus 
employment interviews by Kansas, regional and 
national employers All eligible candidates are 
urged to register and apply 

MORTAR BOARD applications are available in 
Union Aclivilts Center and are due Feb G at S 
p.m. 

CONGRESSIONAL TEACHEH SCHOLAR- 
SHIP PROGRAM Informalion and applications 
forms available in Bluemont 017 

COLLEGE OF EDI CATION STL' DENT 
COUNCIL applications ore available in Bluetnonl 
13 and are due Monday 

TODAY 

ASWK'IATION OF ADCLTS RETURNING TO 
SCHOOL meets from II: JO a.m. to 1:30 p m. In 
I'nion Stateroom .1 



f SCHNAPPS , 
NIGHTI 



U-LEARN will have * Uble in the Union from » 
am lo J p m. to sign up volunteers 

STUDENTS IN SOLIDARITY WITH CEN- 
TRAL AMERICA meets at 12 » pm on Ihe 
island between the Union and Seaton 

UNIVERSITY FOR MAN will nave a table in 
the Umrm from in am to 2 p m 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL has scheduled the 
final oral defense o* the doctoral dissertation of 
Lynn Marie Firestone at 1; SO p.m. in Bluemont 
368 The dissertation topic is "Teachers 
Knowledge and Attitudes about Child Abuse and 
Neglect: A Case Study " 

UNITED NATIONS meets at 7 pm. in Union 
205 Anyone interested in attending the model 
United Nations in Nebraska is invited. 

MINORITY ASSEMBLY OF STUDENTS IN 
HEALTH meet* at 8 p m in Union M2 

THURSDAY 

AG AMBASSADORS meet at « p.m. in Waters 
137. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERS meets at I 30 p m in Ackert 120 

ALPHA Ml ALPHA meets at 4 p m In Union 
Stateroom 3. 

SAILING CLUB meets at 7 p.m. In Union 208 



SCHNAPPS 
WED. 





$1 SCHNAPPS 
SHOTS 
$1.50 FUZZY 
NAVELS 



Plus... 
Chicken Fry Nlft 

50S olt 

Critc(>er> Fry Sandwiches 

75<t off 

Chicken Fry Platters 

Qrill Open 



2 Large One-Topping 
Pizzas $14 

2 Med. Two-Topping 

Pizzas $12.25 

Plus a FREE Quart of 

Pepsi 

Buy a 10" Supreme, 
Receive One FREE! 




We Have Expanded to 

serve you quicker & 

better. 

FREE DELIVERY 

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1127 Moro-Aggieville 




TONIGHT 

Mexican Beer $1.25 

Tequila $1.25 
Draws 80C 

Well Drinks $1.50 
Wine $1 



AAcCaM AMditorim 








t 



The All-Campus 
Leadership 
Workshop 
is coming 




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Saturday, Jan. 31st is the day for . . 
Leadership: Accept the Challenge 

K-State Union Little Theatre 
8:30-11:55 a.m. 

Programs Include: 

Delegation Goal Setting 

Motivation Leadership Styles 

Attitudes SGA Funding 

Burnout Campus Issues 

Everyone Welcome 

Sponsored by 

Student Governing Association, 

University Activities Board, 

Mortar Board 




NOTICE: 



STUDENT HEALTH FEE 

Entitles you to all the services 

available at a reduced cost at 

m Lafene Health Center. 

NOTE: The student health fee is not 

a substitute for health insurance. 

A minimal user charge will be 

assessed for some services. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION 
CONTACT 

LAFENE HEALTH CENTER 

"Your Medical Facility" 



The Young 
Americans 

"Around the World 
in 80 Days" 

An All New Musical Revue 

Thursday, January 29, 1987 
8:00 p.m. 

Tickets and information 
(913)532-6428 
MasterCard/VISA accepted 







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Telefund to target alumni donations 



By STACEV CAMPBELL 
Collegian Reporter 

In the coming months, students 
will have an opportunity to help 
finance scholarships for fellow 
classmates by placing telephone 
calls to K-State alumni. 

Throughout February and 
March, participants in the K-State 
Telefund will raise money by 
telephoning alumni and asking for 
contributions. 

The KSU Foundation works with 
each college in organizing the Tele- 
fund, said Gordon Do well, assistant 
director of communications for the 
Foundation. 

"We contact people in the col- 
leges and they select others to 
serve as Telefund coordinators," 
Dowell said. 

Each college's administration 
decides how to use the money rais- 
ed by the Telefund, he said. Usually 
the money is used for college 
scholarships, educational 
materials or supplies. 

For example, coordinators in the 
College of Agriculture select four 
team captains for each night the 



college must call, and each captain 
is required to find 10 people to call 
alumni for that team's night. 

Each night a 30-minute orienta- 
tion session will be held to teach 
students how to respond to alumni 
questions and help them become 
comfortable during the calling ses- 
sion, Dowell said. 

"Each year we try to increase the 
level of each alumni's giving," he 
said. "For example, if an alumni 
gave $50 last year, we might ask for 
$75 this year." 

Students do not use high-pressure 
sales tactics. Instead, the telephone 
acts as a facilitator for alumni who 
want to donate, Dowell said. 

The first Telefund, held in 1979, 
raised $110,000 from donations of 
more than 4,000 K-State alumni. 

Last year's Telefund raised 
$410,000 — $65,000 more than the 
previous year. Some of the increase 
in donations was due to the College 
of Veterinary Medicine par- 
ticipating for the first time and 
raising $25,000, Dowell said. 

"The increase is due to us (the 
Foundation) doing a better job, the 
colleges doing a better job of 



recruiting students to work and the 
increased giving of alumni," 
Dowell said. 

The goal for this year's Telefund 
is to meet and beat last year's 
totals, Dowell said. To ensure that 
the goal is reached, the Foundation 
has implemented some new incen- 
tives for this year's Telefund. 

"We are expanding publicity 
about the Telefund by having the 
colleges include information about 
the Telefund in the publications 
they send to alumni," Dowell said. 
"This year students who call will 
receive gifts. These gifts go to the 
students who have the most pledges 
over a five-evening period." 

The grand prize will be a stereo 
system. Other prizes include a sym- 
phonic video cassette recorder, a 
portable television and complimen- 
tary dinners at local restaurants, 
Dowell said. 

"Our objective is to get the top 
callers of each college to come 
back," Dowell said. 

In addition, the Foundation will 
award college-level prizes. These 
will be given to the person in each 
college who has the highest one- 



night pledge total over the time 
period the college is calling. 

Nightly prizes will be given to 
students having the most pledges 
each night of the Telefund. 

The College of Agriculture uses 
student leaders to help organize 
teams for the agriculture Telefund, 
said John Riley, assistant director 
of resident instruction for the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. 

' 'The fund-raiser is an experience 
in leadership development for those 
students involved," Riley said. 
"I'm pleased with the enthusiasm 
of the students that do participate. 
Many times these students act as 
the link between the University and 
alumni." 

"The K-State alumni are very 
supportive," Dowell said. "Twenty- 
two percent of our alumni support 
K-State. This is almost four times 
greater than the 6.2 percent of 
alumni that support Oklahoma 
State University." 

The information collected by the 
Council for Financial Aid to Educa- 
tion shows the national average for 
alumni supporting their university 
is about 15 percent, Dowell said. 



Concern for missing envoy rises; reports differ 



By The Associated Press 

BEIRUT, Lebanon — Fears grew 
Tuesday for Anglican Church envoy 
Terry Waite, last seen eight days ago 
when he left for secret talks with 
Shiite Moslem kidnappers to seek the 
release of hostages. 

One report Tuesday said Waite 
was still negotiating. Another said he 
was placed under house arrest by the 
Moslems he went to bargain with 

Archbishop Robert Runcie of 
Canterbury said in London he was 
"greatly concerned" about Waite's 
safety. 

Waite arrived in the Lebanese 
capital on Jan. 12. Since then, 11 
more foreigners have been abducted 
in Beirut, The latest, a Saudi Ara- 
bian, was grabbed by gunmen Mon- 
day night. 

Police evacuated eight French 
teachers from Moslem west Beirut to 
Christian east Beirut on Tuesday. A 



police official said the French were 
taken across the capital's dividing 
Green Line at the request of the 
French government. 

The eight had been teaching for 
some time at three schools in west 
Beirut, said the official, who refused 
to he further identified. 

The evacuation came after the 
spate of kidnappings sent the 
number of foreigners missing in 
Lebanon soaring to 26 — eight 
Americans, six Frenchmen, two 
West Germans, two Britons, two 
Saudis, an Irishman, an Italian, a 
South Korean, an Indian and two as 
yet unidentified foreigners. 

Three gunmen grabbed Khaled 
Deeb, a Saudi Arabian, in the 
predominantly Shiite Maramel 
neighborhood on Beirut's airport 
highway at 10 p.m. Monday, police 
said. 

They said they have no further in- 
formation about the victim. 



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Radio stations operating in 
Lebanon reported a frenzy of rumors 
about Waite, Runcie 's personal 
emissary. They variously reported 
Waite in Beirut, outside Beirut, kid- 
napped, under house arrest or conti- 
nuing negotiations. They had various 
groups involved in the negotiations 
with him. 

The Christian Voice of Free 
Lebanon radio said Waite was "con- 
tinuing tough negotiations with the 
hostage-holders in Beirut." The 
radio, with a history of inaccuracies 
about Moslem-related matters, gave 
no attribution. 

Kuwait's official news agency 
KUNA said Monday night that the 
kidnappers bargaining with Waite 
had placed him under house arrest in 
a secret location. 

The agency quoted unidentified 
sources close to the negotiations as 
saying, "They (the kidnappers) de- 
tained him and put him under forced 



habitation after his attempts to 
reach a quick agreement were snarl- 
ed." 

Runcie, commenting on Waite's 
longest underground mission in 
Lebanon since 1985, said he had "no 
direct evidence" to confirm the 
Kuwaiti version. 

Druse warlord Walid Jumblatt's 
Progressive Socialist Party, whose 
militia has been responsible for 
Waite's security, refused to com- 
ment. 

Waite was last seen Jan. 20 even- 
ing as he left his seaside Riviera 
Hotel, reportedly to negotiate witb 
Islamic Jihad, a pro-Iranian Shiite 
Moslem group. 

Islamic Jihad, or Islamic Holy 
War, holds Terry A. Anderson, 39, 
chief Middle East correspondent for 
The Associated Press; and Thomas 
Sutherland, 55, of Fort Collins, Colo., 
acting dean of agriculture at the 
American University of Beirut. 



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KAMtAt tTATg COLUiQIAN, W>dn— d«y, Jimwry 21, \Wt 

Senate votes on bills 
for permits, insurance 



By The Associated Press 

TOPEKA — A proposal to require 
senior citizens to pay for motor vehi- 
cle permits when visiting state parks 
on weekends and holidays was killed 
Tuesday in the Kansas Senate after it 
was described as "bad legislation." 

The measure failed on a 20-20 vote 
in the 40-member Senate. Another 
bill, which would prevent insurance 
salesmen from writing "brother-in- 
law deals" on property and casualty 
insurance policies, cleared the 
chamber 40-0 and was forwarded to 
the House for consideration. 

Sen. James Francisco, D-Mulvane, 
led the effort to reject the camping- 
fee bill, saying it was unfair to seijior 
citizens to charge them for visiting 
state parks that often are empty on 
weekends. 

The bill would have eliminated a 
current senior citizen exemption to 
the fees charged campers using state 
parks. There are about 18,000 special 
permits issued each year for senior 
citizens who park their mobile homes 
and recreational vehicles in cam- 
pgrounds at state parks. 

Sen. Gus Bogina, R-Lenexa, said 
the Parks and Resources Authority 
estimated the bill would generate 
about $142,000 by charging the senior 
citizens who now camp free on 
weekends. 



"This would provide better utiliza- 
tion of our parks." 

Francisco rejected the argument, 
however, and cited a number of state 
parks which he said are empty on 
weekends during the summer camp- 
ing months. He said placing fees on 
the senior citizens would further 
discourage use of the parks. 

Sen. Neil Arasmith, 

R-Phillipsburg, said the insurance 
bill would allow the insurance com- 
missioner's office to strictly police 
commercial lines of property and 
casualty insurance policies written 
by companies operating in Kansas. 

"The most important thing about 
this bill is that it would do away with 
brother-in-law deals," Arasmith 
said, referring to policies written by 
insurance salesmen for their friends 
which have special provisions or dis- 
counted rates not available to the 
general public. 

The insurance commissioner 
would be able to set specific rates 
and give him the power to reject 
rating plans not meeting his stan- 
dards. The bill stems from summer 
study which revealed the commis- 
sioner lacked legal power to regulate 
deviations from rate filings. 



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Editorial 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wednesday, January 28, 1987 - 4 



Kansas 
State 




O 



riai on 



EDITOR 

Jonie Trued 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Sue Dawson 
NEWS EDITOR 

Erin Eicher 



EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 

Deron Johnson 
PHOTO/GRAPHICS EDITOR 

Andy Nelson 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Sheila Hutinett 



EOITUKWI. BOARD: Susan Bsird, Sue Dawson, Jim D»eU, Erin Eicher, Judy Gold**** «*> **%}*> J**"* 

Deron Johnson. Judy Lurrfstrom, Scott Miller. Andy Nelson, Patti Piwon, Julie tte>™d^ChrU Stewirt, Teresa 
Temme Jonie Trued. Unsigned editorials represent the majority opinion ol the editorial board. 

THE CQ1XBQUN (I'SPSMl 121 1 is published by Student Publications Inc. Kansas State University, daily except 
Saturdays. Sundays, holidays and University vacation periods- OFFICES are in thenorUi wuujof Kejfaie Hat), phone 
S32-«SS5 W«N» 11. ASK POSTAGE paid at Manhattan, Kan. 66502 Sl'BSCHIPTION RATES: «M»»W, MO. 
academic year, »i. semester. t», summer term. 110 Address changes and letters to the editor should be sent to the 
Kansas State TolU-gian. Kedrie 103, Kansas State University, Manhattan. Kan. 64506. 



Free expression rights 
on trial in court case 



There is a case pending before 
the U.S. Supreme Court which 
has the potential to erode the con- 
stitutionally guaranteed 
freedoms of student journalists in 
a most serious way. 

The high court recently agreed 
to hear a case involving censor- 
ship of a high school paper in the 
St. Louis suburb of Hazelwood. It 
is the first such case the court has 
agreed to hear, and a ruling is ex- 
pected in the spring of 1988, 

The incident involved the 
school's principal pulling two 
stories from the paper, one 
describing student experiences 
with pregnancy and the other 
dealing with the impact of 
divorce on children. 

In 1983, three students filed 
suit, losing in federal district 
court in St. Louis. However, a 
federal appeals court ruled for 
the students and rejected the 
district court's claim that the 
newspaper wasn't considered a 
"public forum" and thus was not 
guaranteed First Amendment 
protection. 

The question facing the court 
now is to determine whether the 
paper is a public forum or simply 
a class project susceptible to ad- 
ministrators' censoring. That the 



court agreed to hear the case is 
significant. 

It could mean it is poised to 
overturn previous rulings on stu- 
dent freedom. This is a distinct 
possibility considering the con- 
servative slant of the court and 
that by simply refusing to hear 
the case it would have reaffirmed 
the students' rights. 

However, the court's hearing of 
the case could signify an intent to 
strengthen student rights by 
chiseling a facet previously unad- 
dressed. 

Regardless of the court's ra- 
tionale, a ruling against the 
students would seriously impede 
student expression and would 
generate repercussions nation- 
wide, including at colleges where 
newspapers are often produced in 
class situations. 

This is not just a case of high 
schoolers trying to put one over 
on authority figures. It is a case 
which will put on trial the 
freedom of expression, the 
discussion of important issues in 
a legitimate forum and the prin- 
ciples upon which this country 
was founded. 

We hope the court fully ap- 
preciates the magnitude of the 
case and rules accordingly. 



A year after disaster, 
NASA faces new start 



One year ago today, at 11:38 
a.m., the solid rocket boosters on 
the space shuttle Challenger ig- 
nited and seven astronauts died 
in a fiery inferno. 

In the past year, the National 
Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration and the American 
people should have learned much 
from this disaster. Before it, 
shuttle launches were taken for 
granted, and there was a belief 
that NASA and the country were 
invincible. Neither is. 

NASA made some terrible 
mistakes. Half a billion dollars in 
spending was cut on safety 
testing, design and development 
from the time the shuttle pro- 
gram began to when the 
Challenger exploded one year 
ago. Government auditors and 
aerospace experts implored 
NASA not to cut testing and other 



development work, but the agen- 
cy refused. 

In its concern to save money, 
NASA forgot that it should also be 
concerned with protecting lives. 

Faulty welds were performed 
on the Challenger and then con- 
cealed through falsified X-rays to 
avoid the cost of repair, NASA 
was spending billions of dollars 
on shuttle equipment that had not 
been thoroughly tested. 

All of these money-saving tac- 
tics were not worth the lives of 
seven Americans. NASA took a 
gamble, and it paid in the worst 

way. 

NASA is starting over again 
and it is hoped the next shuttle 
flight — planned for early next 
year — will be enveloped in all 
the precautions as the first. On 
this day, Americans should 
remember the seven astronauts 
and ail they stood for. 



Condom ads rejected 
by hypocritical media 



The American media have 
been putting up quite a resistance 
of late regarding the advertise- 
ment of condoms on television 
and in the more well-known 
periodicals in this country. Only a 
handful of television stations 
have allowed condom commer- 
cials to be aired. 

This streak of stubborness and 
" Victorianism" on the part of the 
media is denying the American 
public access to very important 
— if not life-saving — informa- 
tion. AIDS researchers have 
pointed out time and time again 
that the best protection against 



AIDS besides abstinence is the 
use of condoms. 

The media have no case in their 
opposition to the advertising of 
condoms, especially when adver- 
tisements dealing with sanitary 
napkins, douches, spermicidal 
suppositories, foams and jellies 
have all graced the pages of 
America's leading magazines 
and the screens of America's 
television stations. 

If the advertising of condoms 
on television and in the more 
popular magazines saves one life, 
then the American media will 
have performed a valuable ser- 
vice to the public. 



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Blue Key "honor' questionable 



Last week, I received a letter from Blue 
Key, an honorary fraternity describing itself 
as "a service organization." The letter 
began with "Dear Student" and then inform- 
ed me that my nomination for consideration 
for membership was "a tremendous honor." 

After reading the entire letter, however, I 
decided against joining — partly because I 
don't want to wear a blue suit to Landon Lec- 
tures and partly because I found a few objec- 
tionable (read discriminatory) items in Blue 
Key's statement of purpose. 

The. letter informed me that "Blue Key 
members* accept as their purpose: Their 
belief in God will be perpetuated and inten- 
sified, the government of the United States 
will be supported and defended and the 
established institutions of society and prin- 
ciples of good citizenship will be preserved." 

What's so objectionable about that? For 
starters, there's that bit about belief in God. 
If the statement of purpose is to mean 
anything, and I assume it does, then 
agnostics and atheists cannot join Blue Key 
without first compromising their beliefs or 
their honesty. Technically, polytheistic 
believers might also have trouble with belief 
in a "God," rather than gods. 

The University's Notice of Non- 
Discrimination states: "The University is 
committed to a policy of non-discrimination 
on the basis of race, sex, national origin, han- 
dicap or other non-merit reasons..." Since 
Blue Key fancies itself as a service organiza- 
tion, I fail to see how one's religion — or lack 
thereof — should have any bearing on 
membership. 

Of course, that is my reading. I'm sure the 
folks at Blue Key have their reasons for 
writing a statement excluding atheists and 
agnostics from their ranks. The question is, 
are those reasons justifiable? 

I also consulted the General Catalog's ex- 
planation of the University's Affirmative Ac- 
tion program, which was a bit more specific : 
"The Affirmative Action Office is available 
to students on matters of equal opportunity 
in all areas, including admissions, access to 
programs and activities and employment. 
The University is committed to a policy of 



Letters 



Keep kids out of it 

Editor, 

Re: pro-life's march and the subsequent 
picture appearing in the Jan. 23 Collegian. I 
applaud Manhattan Right to Life and 
Dreamhouse Inc., as well as everyone who 
participated in Thursday's march against 
the 14-year-old Roe vs. Wade decision. The 
first amendment to the US. Constitution pro- 
tects its citizens' freedom of speech and their 
right to peaceably assemble. I urge all 
mature and well-informed people to par- 
ticipate in such activities, as there are many 
worthy public issues which should be openly 
discussed and debated. 

However, I strongly object to the use of 
children in delivering this particular group's 
message. They should not have carried signs 
or the coffin as pictured in the Collegian. I 
personally viewed the demonstration and 
was disturbed with the children's role. 

I doubt these children are fully aware of all 
the implications and complicated issues in- 
volved in abortion. I am rather dubious that 
all of these children have had the "facts of 
life" explained to them by their parents, let 
alone the controversial issues of birth control 
and abortion. They should not have had to 
walk in Thursday's frigid weather displaying 
signs such as "Choose Chastity. Not An- 
nihilation." I would be quite interested in this 
young girl's opinions on chastity as well as 




equal educational opportunity regardless of 
race, sex, religion, national origin, age or 
handicap." 

That's great, but someone apparently 
forgot to inform those "individuals of all- 
around ability" at Blue Key. The point is not 
whether Blue Key will allow atheists, 
agnostics or polytheists to join. The presi- 
dent of Blue Key assured me that no one 
would be asked to take an oath. The point is 
that by joining an organization which 
specifically seeks to intensify the belief in 
one god, one must de facto cease to be an 
atheist, agnostic or polytheist. 

Next, there is the spiel about supporting 
and defending the government of the United 
States. Note, Blue Key does not necessarily 
support and defend the U.S. Constitution, but 
the U.S. government. So what exactly does it 
mean to support and defend the U.S. govern- 
ment? 

Does it mean one must approve of this na- 
tion's history of intervention in Latin 
America — a history which continues today 
as the present administration wages its pro- 
xy war against the people of Nicaragua? 
Does it mean one must approve of this 
government's cooperation with the Israeli 
regime in its endeavor to destroy the Palesti- 
nian people? 

Or how about this country's position as the 
only member of Western society that still ex- 
ecutes its own citizens? Or, does it mean one 
must applaud Congress' genocidal campaign 
against the people of Big Mountain, Ariz., a 
forced removal of more than 10,000 native 
Americans from land both legally and tradi- 
tionally theirs? Do these sound like the 
"principles of good citizenship" Blue Key 



members have in mind? 

In all fairness, however, I assume Blue 
Key is willing to overlook these minor details 
and offer their support and defense to the 
U.S. government because of the ideals which 
it claims to represent — ideals like TRUTH, 
FREEDOM and EQUALITY. Yet, if that is 
the case, then I'm left wondering how an 
organization can talk about TRUTH when it 
is apparently so insecure about its own 
ASSUMPTIONS masquerading as TRUTH, 
that it discriminates against ideas like 
atheism, agnosticism and polytheism. 

Indeed, how can the folks at Blue Key talk 
about FREEDOM and EQUALITY, when 
they imply in their statement of purpose that 
people of certain political and religious per- 
suasions need not apply? Why, the whole 
thing smacks of hypocrisy, and perhaps that 
is why Blue Key has chosen to defend and 
support the government of the United States 
rather than the Constitution. 

Again, the point is not that only anarchists 
might be barred from membership in Blue 
Key, for surely one could lie and say that he 
or she supports the U.S. government. No, the 
point is that one can either hold certain 
political opinions or one can lie to appear 
that one holds those political opinions — a 
Catch-22 for anyone with liberal leanings and 
a shred of integrity. 

Then, as if to contradict everything it has 
just stated about its required belief in God 
and support and defense of the U.S. govern- 
ment, the letter adds that its members have 
"an ambition for intellectual attainment." It 
would seem that "intellectual attainment" 
does not include discussion of diverse opi- 
nions, critical thinking and honesty — in 
short, REAL education. 

But for all the contradictions and seeming 
violations of the University's commitment to 
non-discrimination, I'm sure there can be 
some sort of compromise worked out. Either 
Blue Key can eliminate the belief in God and 
the support and defense of the U.S. govern- 
ment as elements of its statement of purpose, 
or the University can change its policy on 
non-discrimination to accommodate Blue 
Key. 



abortion. 

Parents, please continue to publicly ex- 
press your views, but let your children 
mature and form intelligent, well-informed 
opinions before they again accompany you in 
a march across campus. 

Geoff It Andersen 
graduate in agricultural economics 

Not enough space 

Editor, 

I was somewhat entertained, but mainly 
disappointed by the "free advertising" of- 
fered by the Collegian to the students runn- 
ing for Student Senate. 1 have no problem 
with having my name and picture in the 
paper. However, I do have a problem with 
being forced to answer two important ques- 
tions about my candidacy with 25 words or 
less — approximately 2*4 lines of print here. 

What entertained me so much was that 
while reading over the questions, I realized 
they were up to 30 words long. Then I realiz- 
ed with a sudden fear that my picture was go- 
ing to be a lot more important in this forum 
of expression than how I felt about important 
issues, I panicked even more when I 
discovered that any responses I wrote had 
the significance of the brand of underwear I 
use and how often I wash it. I felt it would 
have been just as important to tell what I had 
for dinner — in 25 words or less, of course. 



It seems that this exercise has little pur- 
pose except to briefly introduce the can- 
didates to the students. That is not a bad pur- 
pose, except the emphasis seems to have 
been placed more on appearance than on opi- 
nions. It's not that I'm ugly, I think, but I 
would rather have had the Collegian leave 
out the picture for a more thorough explana- 
tion of my position on the issues. 

I felt the newspaper could have better in- 
formed the students on their possible future 
representatives with a different format that 
lent more to a discussion of the issues. I 
would dislike winning mainly because of my 
picture, but 1 would regret losing because of 
it also. 

By the way, my underwear is mainly J.C. 
Penney, generic white and is washed after 
every wearing. 

Douglas L. Oetinger 
Junior In general business 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

pertaining to matters of public interest 
are encouraged. All letters must be 
typewritten or neatly printed and 
signed by the author and should not 
exceed 300 words. The author's major, 
classification or other identification 
and a telephone number where the 
author can be reached during business 
hours must be included. 



K-State student wins $7,000 Amoco award 



By P*TT1 PAXSON 
Collegian Reporter 

For his academic excellence, a 
student has been awarded $7,000 to 
pay for his expenses for the 1988-87 
year through a grant from the 
Amoco Foundation Inc. 

Paul Johnson, graduate student 
in mechanical engineei ing and 
recipient of the award, said this is 
the first year the Amoco Master's 
Fellowship has been offered at 
K-State. The mechanical engineer- 
ing department is trying to arrange 
for the fellowship to be offered 
every year to a graduate student in 



the department, he said. 

The criteria for choosing the 
Amoco fellowship recipient is bas- 
ed on outstanding academic perfor- 
mance and the student's potential 
for success in the engineering pro- 
fession, said Paul Miller, head of 
the Department of Mechanical 
Engineering. 

But Johnson said he was chosen 
because his research on transmis- 
sions is very similar to the type of 
research Amoco is doing. 

"I'm interested in researching 
oils and fuels and the automotive 
market in general," Johnson said. 

Johnson, who is from Sedgwick, 



said he used to work as a test 
engineer at Funk Manufacturing in 
Coffeyville after he graduated from 
K-State in 1964. His undergraduate 
degree is in mechanical engineer- 
ing. 

Funk Manufacturing donated the 
transmission on which Johnson is 
doing his research at K-State, he 
said. Funk Manufacturing makes 
industrial-sized, construction- 
related engines. The results of 
Johnson's research will actually be 
used by Funk Manufacturing when 
he graduates with his master's 
degree in May 1987, he said. 

"My adviser (Ralph Turnquist, 



professor of mechanical engineer- 
ing) and I are hoping to publish a 
technical paper as a result of this 
research," Johnson said. 

Not only did Amoco award him 
with a fellowship, but Johnson is be- 
ing offered a job with Amoco as 
well. He is scheduled to interview 
for the job in Chicago, he said. The 
interview, which will be in 
February, is for a research position 
at an Amoco facility just outside of 
Chicago. 

In addition to his research at 
K-State, Johnson is active in the 
Society of Automotive Engineers. 



Program benefits first- time job hunters 



By LAUREN BRUNO 
Collegian Reporter 



As college students face the pro- 
blems of securing employment after 
graduation, people from small Kan- 
sas communities are attempting to 
enter the job market with the help of 
a University-sponsored program. 

The Single Parent/Displaced 
Homemaker Program has been in- 
itiated to help single parents and 
other people trying to gain employ- 
ment, said Joan Goins, program 
coordinator of the program. 

"The program is targeted toward 
single parents and people entering 
the work force for the first time or 
returning after several years." said 
Goins. But anyone is welcome. 

Last summer, a special class of- 
fered by University For Man was 
held for college students. The 
students found the class to be 
especially helpful for techniques in 
resume writing, she said. 



Students are also welcome to at- 
tend classes held in the community, 
she said. 

Hie program was initiated six 
years ago by Evelyn Hausmann, 
associate professor of the Depart- 
ment of Adult and Occupational 
Education. 

The program is currently serving 
seven counties in the surrounding 
area: Clay, Geary, Marshall, Pot- 
tawatomie, Riley, Wabaunsee and 
Washington counties. 

The program aids people by offer- 
ing classes to individuals who are in- 
terested in entering the job market. 
The class offers vocational and oc- 
cupational guidance, individual sup- 
portive counseling, personal 
development training and informa- 
tion on how to write a resume and 
prepare for a interview. 

During a class session, guest 
speakers from businesses in the com- 
munity conduct interviews with par- 
ticipants to help them develop self- 



confidence, Goins said. 

The program is funded by the state 
Department of Education in the 
Vocational Education Division and 
co-sponsored by the College of 
Education. All classes and materials 
are free to anyone interested. 

"Our program at (the University) 
is unique in that it is the only rural 
outreach program where services 
are provided directly in the com- 
munities," she said. 

Goins teaches classes in each com- 
munity. Classes are offered during 
the spring, summer and fall, and 
enrollment varies from five to 15 peo- 
ple in the community. 

"Most of the people we help have a 
high school level education. 

"Since September, 39 percent of 
the participants were farm 
families," Goins said. As a result of 
the severe crisis, many farm 
families recently suffered, and 
farmers' wives are entering the work 
force for the first time, she said. 



Leadership focus of SGA seminar 



By The Collegian Staff 

Students who want to "Accept The 
Challenge" of being leaders can at- 
tend the All-Campus Leadership 
Workshop Saturday in the K-State 
Union. 

Sponsored by Student Governing 
Association, the workshop is open to 
students involved in campus ac- 
tivities and those wanting to become 
involved in campus organizations or 
to learn the fundamentals of leader- 
ship. 

"It's important to know that 
anyone can come to the workshop," 
said Sally Routson, coordinator of 
student activities. "There are a 
variety of sessions for individual 
students who want to tone up their 
personal development skills." 



Routson said the topics are geared 
for both students involved in campus 
activities and those who aren't. The 
topics include attitudes, burnout, 
delegating authority, setting goals, 
leadership styles, motivating 
members and SGA funding. 

Other discussion sessions are 
targeted at students interested in 
becoming involved in SGA. 

"This workshop is held at the time 
of year when students are interested 
in an SGA leadership position," 
Routson said. 

There will be a mandatory session 
for candidates running in the SGA 
general election Feb. 10 and 11. Can- 
didates will draw for positions on the 
ballot and receive information about 
election rules and procedures, spen- 
ding guidelines and literature and 



posting regulations. 

In addition, the workshop will in- 
clude sessions about campaign 
strategies and campus issues. Steven 
Johnson, student body president, will 
moderate a panel discussion on the 
athletic fee and the effects of the 
statewide budget cuts on the Univer- 
sity. 

The workshop will begin at 8:30 
a.m. in the Union Little Theater with 
Robert Krause, vice president for in- 
stitutional advancement, giving the 
welcome and opening remarks. 

Sessions will be held on the hour 
beginning at 9 a.m. and will continue 
through noon Routson said students 
may attend as many sessions as they 
wish or come and go when conve- 
nient. 




LAFLIN 

Books 8f Copies 

•4C self-service copies 
•Full service copy center 
•Resume service 

OPEN DAILY 

M-F 8-9 Sat. 9-5 Sun. 12-9 

FirstSank Center Oenison & Clallin 

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TONITE 
Ladies Night 



$2 Pitchers 
$1.25 Coolers 



Thursday 

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The 

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1 120 V! or o 539-9064 




Kansas State University 

and 

Univ. of Calif.— Santa Barbara 

present 

5 Actors From Th« 
London S toga 

appearing (or 

5 Exciting Days 

Wed., Jan. 28 

Trevor Baxter 

in W.H. Auden's 
"The Sea And The Mirror" 
Wareham Theatre— 8 p.m. 

FREE ADMISSION 



Fri. & Sat. 
Jan. 30 & 31 



Thurs., Jan. 29 

Pinter This Evening 

Readings from The Tempest 

Harold Pinter's plays Dy William Shakespeare 

McCain Auditorium 



Nichols Theatre 
8 p,m.-$5/$3 




For Tickets Call 
532-6398 
i Mon.-Fri. 12-5 p.m. 



8 p.m.— $8/$4 

Kansas 

Committee for the 
Humanities 

AfMiit* of tht fUi«m#i LndotomcM lor ih* Hum*rtiht» 



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913-778-3300 

Full Physc an Coverage 
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Equipment Center 



Working Together for a Healthier You 
SUNSET AVE. AT CLAFLIN RD., MANHATTAN, KS 



The program's goal is to help in- 
dividuals in all 62 communities in the 
seven counties in which it operates. 

The K-State division of the Single 
Parent/Displaced Homemaker Pro- 
gram is a member of the displaced 
homemakers network, the only 
organization in the country working 
at a local, state, regional and na- 
tional lever 




TONIGHT 

$ 2 Pitche rs 

Thursday 

$DAZE$ 

Saturday 
Magnum PI night 

16 oz. Coors/Coors Lt cans 

$1 

Tom Selleck 

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Wednesday 

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House drinks 

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Blended drinks 



Wines 

616 N. I 2th 539-9967 



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KAHlAl tTATl COLLIOIAN, W«dw— day, January », 1M7 

Department of Health 
low on vaccine supply 



By The Associated Press 

TOPEKA — A statewide whooping 
cough outbreak — coupled with a na- 
tional shortage of the diphtheria, 
tetanus and pertussis vaccine — has 
exhausted the Kansas Department of 
Health and Environment's supply of 
the vaccine. 

Bob Moody, health and environ- 
ment spokesman, said the agency is 
hoping local county health depart- 
ments have enough DTP vaccine in 
stock to tie them over until the state 
can find a new supplier of the vac- 
cine. 

"We are out," Moody said of the 
vaccine. "We supply local county 
health departments and we don't 
have any at all. Our problem was ex- 
acerbated by the pertussis outbreak 
we've had. Earlier this month, we 
ran out of the vaccine, although most 
counties still have some on hand." 

Moody said the agency normally 
distributes 90,000-100,000 doses of the 
vaccine each year, or an average of 
7,500 doses each month. He said the 
state health agency tries to keep a 
month's supply in stock. 



"The shortage problem is being 
dealt with in a number of states," 
Moody said. "1 understand Iowa has 
no DTP vaccine and Missouri is run- 
ning low." 

The state agency is exploring 
several ways of alleviating its shor- 
tage. It can negotiate with other 
states to acquire part of their inven- 
tories, change the immunization 
schedules now in effect to conserve 
the vaccine or seek congressional ap- 
proval to begin distributing DTP 
vaccine it has stored in an emergen- 
cy stockpile. 

"Hopefully by mid- February there 
wUl be more vaccine available," 
Moody said. "Meanwhile, we're try- 
ing to find some on a temporary 
basis. However, we have not chang- 
ed our recommendation of im- 
munization schedules." 

The normal schedule calls for 
children to receive three shots and 
then two later "booster" shots to pro- 
vide maximum protection against 
the three diseases. 

The Kansas health department 
gets its DTP vaccine from the 
Centers for Disease Control. 




Ihtr itor Pub 




Wed "Twisters** 

Thurs Male Strippers "Sheer Delight' 1 

Fri ."Reel Features" f „ 

* / 

537-9877 



Sat ..."Reel Features" 

•Cover charge & ID required • 
Next to Tuttle Creek Dam 



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Panhellenic Council 

announces 

Open Rush 

February 8-23, 1987 

The participating sororities are: 

ALPHA CHI OMEGA 

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA 

ALPHA XI DELTA 

KAPPA DELTA 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 



* Register with Greek Affairs in Holton 
Hall 203 by Feb. 6. 

* $5 Registration Fee 



************************************ 




LEARNING AND 
CHILD CARE CENTER 

1811 BROWNING 

776-4444 



MANY LEARNING 
PROGRAMS AVAILABLE 

• Pre-school-3-year-old 
classes and 4-year-old 

■ Full-and half-day care 

• Drop-in care 

• Before and after school 
care (we bus to Amanda 
Arnold and Marlatt) 

• Hot Lunches and Snacks 

LOW FEES— 

R0FESSI0NAL CARE 

FULL DAY CARE 

$7.95 PER DAY 




■^•^ 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, WwtnMdiy, January »,_1M7 



Local election filing deadlines prompt candidates 



By JUDD ANN1S 
Collegian Reporter 



The decision not to run for re- 
election by three veteran members 
of the Manhattan-Ogden school 
board has led to the most wide-open 
race of recent times. 

Only one incumbent was among 
the seven candidates who filed for 
the four, four-year terms on the USD 
383 School Board before the filing 
deadline noon Tuesday. 

Opting not to run for re-election 
were three K-State faculty 
members: Frank Tillman, head of 
the Department of Industrial 
Engineering; Charles Thompson, 
professor of psychology; and Bob 
Newsome, area extension director. 

Three of the candidates who filed 
for the four-year terms have K State- 
connections: Jim Lindquist, director 
of Riley County Extension; Mary 
Nichols, temporary instructor of 
speech ; and Bob Shoop, professor of 
educational law. 

A longtime area resident, Lind- 



quist has lived in Manhattan since 
1969 

Nichols, a former high school 
English teacher, has served as 
school board observer for the League 
of Women Voters. 

Shoop was named one of four 
outstanding teachers of K-State in 
1976-77, as well as serving on the Mc- 
Cain Auditorium Board of Directors. 



Other candidates are Shirley 
Bramhall, Joleen Hill, Flordie M 
Pettis and Barbara Withee. 

Bramhall is a district parent with a 
child at each level — elementary, 
middle and high school. 

Hill, wife of the late school board 
member Don Hill, previously applied 
for the remainder of her husband's 
term after his death in 1985, but was 



unsuccessful in the attempt. 

Pettis, a Manhattan resident for 23 
years, is currently an eight-county 
area manager for the state's Depart 
ment of Social Rehabilitation Ser- 
vices. 

The only incumbent running, 
Withee has already served three full 
four-year terms. She has been a 
member of the board since 1975. 



Commission candidates face spring primary 



By The Collegian Staff 

Eight area residents competing for 
three City Commission seats will 
have to first participate in a primary 
election on March 3. 

The candidates will be competing 
for the seats currently held by com- 
missioners Nancy Denning, Suzanne 
Lindamood and Mayor Rick Mann. 

Linda mood and Mann announced 
they will not be running for re- 
election. Denning, president of a 
local marketing and advertising 
firm, will be seeking her second 



term. 

Joining incumbent Denning will 
be: 

— Bob Newsome, area extension 
director with K-State and 16-year 
veteran of the Manhattan school 
board. 

— Kent Glasscock, president of 
Kansas Lumber Co. Homestore, 
chairman of Manhattan Parks and 
Recreation Board, co-chairman of 
the Quality of Life bond issue cam- 
paign and K-State graduate. 

— Roger Maughmer, supervisor 
for the local Southwestern Bell office 



and graduate of Washburn Universi- 
ty. 

— Walt Gatsche, local private in- 
vestigator and bail bondsman. 

— Richard Hayter, associate pro- 
fessor and director of engineering 
extension at K-State. 

— Ruth A. Schrum, American 
history teacher at Fort Riley Junior 
High School, resident of Manhattan 
since 1942 and K-State graduate. 

— Stanley Crowder, K-State Union 
clerk, a Manhattan resident for 10 
years and U.S. Army retiree. 



Due to the death of Hill, a two-year 
unexpired term needs to be filled. 
This seat is separate from the other 
four spots available because Hill 
died while serving as a school board 
member. 

Filing for the two-year unexpired 
term are: Rudy Clarenburg, pro- 
fessor of anatomy and physiology; 
Beverly E. Eversmeyer, the only 
teacher to file for the school board; 
Allen Nesbitt, a Junction City car 
dealership sales representative; and 
Gary Turner, a district supervisor 
for True Value Harware. 

If more than twice as many can- 
didates file as there are positions 
available, a primary election is held 
to reduce the number of candidates, 
said Eileen Colbert, of the Riley 
County Clerk's Office. 

Although no primary will be re- 
quired for the seven candidates for 
the four, four-year terms, a March 3 
primary will be held to reduce the 
number of candidates for the two- 
year term to two. The general elec- 
tion is April 7. 



Two students announce presidential candidacies 



By JULIE REYNOLDS 
Business/Government Editor 

The role of the student body presi- 
dent, communication between the 
student body president and students, 
and new ideas concerning K-State 
were discussed by two candidates in 
separate news conferences. 

Brett Bromich, senior in 
marketing, announced his candidacy 
Monday, and Kent Bradley, junior in 
nutrition science, announced his can- 
didacy Tuesday. 

"The majority of the student body 
president's time is spent represen- 
ting the students to various organiza- 
tions," Bromich said, "The president 
can get the most accomplished in 
these committees." 



"The role of the student body presi- 
dent is representing students' views 
and concerns to the faculty, ad- 
ministration, Board of Regents and 
Legislature," Bradley said. 

Bromich said in the past the presi- 
dent has been concerned with 
"dollar-oriented projects," and the 
president does not have authority to 
accomplish projects which require 
capital. 

A major project Bromich would 
like to accomplish is getting a 
guarantee from the administration 
stating students will always have 
control over student monies. 

Bromich would also like to see the 
image of academic programs im- 
proved. 

"We have some excellent pro- 



grams here," he said. "Many col- 
leges are accredited, and K-State has 
a few degrees that are only offered 
here. 

"The programs need to be talked 
about within the University and to 
high school students, potential 
K-State students," Bromich said. 
"By improving the overall image of 
K-State, you enhance desirability to 
come here." 

By increasing the image of 
K-State's academic programs to 
potential employers, Bromich said a 
K-State degree takes on a greater 
value 

Bradley said the student body 
president must be accessible to the 
students. 

"As student body president, I 



would, at least once a week, eat at 
the residence halls to make myself 
accessible to the students who live in 
the halls," Bradley said. 

Maintaining visits to clubs and liv- 
ing groups is important, he said. 

Bradley would also like to set up a 
"peer evaluation team," consisting 
of students. The team would enter a 
classroom, at the teacher's request, 
complete a written survey of the 



classroom activities and conduct an 
open discussion with the students. 

Students would be able to openly 
discuss problems they are experienc- 
ing with a certain class, the evalua- 
tion would be given to the instructor, 
and class improvements could be 
made immediately, Bradley said. 

' "This is a way for students to have 
a direct voice in the quality of educa- 
tion they receive in the classroom." 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wednesday, January 28, 1987 - 7 



FRUITS 



of the 



VINE 



Me, thee and a great 

American Chablis 



Wine snobs have kept a good thing 
to themselves long enough. 

Many people believe a knowledge of 
"good" wines is a sign of ultimate 
sophistication and that wine con- 
noisseurs have some exotic and secret 
chromosome that allows them to call 
themselves experts — oenologists — 
those who study wine making. 

Americans in particular are sub- 
dued, even awed, by the Frenchman's 
or the Italian's ability to choose the 
perfect dinner wine. 

But while the experts are debating 
acidity, residual alcohol content and 
the effects of old or new wood on red 
wines, you don't really have to know 
all the details of wine making in order 
to enjoy drinking it. 

What wine connoisseurship does 
NOT require is exact wine tasting 
techniques, a huge budget, command 
of a foreign language or time to 
memorize a list of wineries and vin- 
tages that continues to enlarge every 
year. 

The first topic of decision for the 
beginning wine enjoyer is what taste 
is generally considered to be "good" 
by the individual. Wine comes in all 
flavors — sweet, sour, dry, fruity, full- 
bodied, light — whatever your 
favorite taste there is undoubtedly a 
wine to match it. And it is YOU, not an 
"expert" who should decide what 
wine tastes good to you. 

Perish the notion that only imported 
wines are any good. Several states in- 
cluding California, Oregon, 
Washington, Arkansas and even 
Oklahoma have been producing 
premium wines for years and the 
selection only becomes better as more 
wineries compete for championship 
titles and American viticulturists 
become more knowledgeable. 

By avoiding the import duties, 
which recently became even stiffer by 
mandate from President Reagan's of- 
fice, the need for a huge budget to ap- 
preciate fine wine is abolished. On the 
average, tourists who pay $4 a bottle 
for a wine in France will pay nearly 
$20 for the same wine in the United 
States. 

Those who insist on paying $20 for a 
$4 wine simply because it appeals to 
their snob complex will be missing out 
on a great made-in-America deal. 
Some unbeatable American-produced 
wines can be purchased for $4-$7. It is 
usually only the older vintages or the 
difficult-to-find bottles that command 
a higher price. 



Another place where Americans are 
fleeced for cheap wine is in 
restaurants. Jerry Mead said in the 
February issue of "Wine & Spirits'* 
magazine that there are several 
reasons why wine is so expensive in 
restaurants. They include state 
monopolies, taxes, the number of mid- 
dlemen involved in the process of get- 
ting the wine to the table, greed and 
"an attitude on the part of many to 
charge what the traffic will bear..." 

While some restaurants have a 
sliding scale on wine markups — that 
is, higher-priced wines are marked up 
a little less than less expensive wines 
— most restauranteurs will take a 
standard 300 percent to 400 percent in- 
crease. 

So restaurants are out for those who 
want to increase their palate 
knowledge but also live within a 
budget. 

Neither does wine have to be drunk 
only with a meal. There are plenty of 
wineries producing products that 
make delightful "Let's curl up on the 
couch and watch 'Saturday Night 
Live"* sipping wines. The perfect ac- 
companiment for wine is whatever or 
whomever you choose. 

Americans seem to have fallen for 
the "if you don't drink the whole bottle 
in one sitting the wine will spoil" 
myth. It was probably made up by a 
wine maker failing at the business. 

The main objective, when not inten- 
ding to drink a whole bottle in one 
evening, is to reseal the bottle as 
tightly as possible — red wines in par- 
ticular go flat after prolonged ex- 
posure to air — and store it away. 

The color of the wine tells the begin- 
ning wine connoisseur many things. 
Generally, red wines (Pinot Noir, 
Burgundy) taste best at room 
temperature and therefore should be 
stored that way. Reds are also 
heavier, more full-bodied wines and 
are commonly served with heavier 
meat dishes like beef or lamb . 

White wines taste best very cold 
(adding ice is acceptable and, depen- 
ding on the wine, sometimes recom- 
mended) and are commonly served 
with lighter dishes of fish and chicken. 

This is not to say you cannot drink 
Chablis with beef stew or Pinot Noir 
with fish. Wine connoisseurs can 
match any combination they want to. 
There are no rights or wrongs to ap- 
preciating wine — ' whatever ex- 
perience tells you is best. 



Illustration by Gary Lytle 
Story by Jonie Trued 




Even novices can decode 
jargonistic wine labels 



Wine labels, especially those 
of Europe, often contain a 
myriad of confusing and irrele- 
vant information. However, in 
recent years, California vinters 
have adopted a form of labeling 
which eliminates much of the 
confusion. 

Following is a list of the most 
important items to look for on a 
label when selecting a wine: 

VINEYARD. WINERY OR 
BRAND NAME: The most pro- 
minent part of most California 
wine labels, this supplies the 
basic information about the 
source of the wine. Since some 
Calif omian wineries, such as 
Gallo or Masson, are huge 
operations, their name on the 
label may not be altogether 
meaningful. However, in the 
case of medium and small 
operations, this part of the label 
can impart a valuable reference 
for future purchases. 

REGION: The label should 
contain a reference to where the 
wine was produced. In Califor- 
nia, common references are to 



areas of the state (for example, 
North Coast), specific counties 
(Napa, Sonoma, Monterey, etc.) 
or specific geographic regions 
within counties (Alexander 
Valley, for instance). Regula- 
tions are currently being formed 
to tighten the regional labeling 
of wines. Usually, the region on 
the label indicates the grapes 
were grown there. 

GRAPE VARIETY: The key 
to a Califirnia label. Unlike most 
European operations, California 
vinters have adopted varietal 
labeling for most of their 
premium wines. When the grape 
variety appears on the bottle, it 
means that by law at least 75 
percent of the grapes must be of 
that variety Most Caifornia 
wineries use 100 percent of the 
grape specified. ( See accompa- 
nying table for the most com- 
mon varietal wines. 

GENERIC TYPE: Blended 
wines from California often use 
the European region which most 
resembles the blend as the name 
for the wine. Thus, Chablis and 



Burgundies abound among 
California labels. In recent 
years, vinters have taken blen- 
ding more seriously and some 
blended wines can be quite good. 
(See accompanying table for the 
most common generic types.) 

YEAR: The year that appears 
on the label is the vintage year 
— that is, the year the grapes 
were harvested, not the year the 
wine was bottled or released. 
Especially in the case of reds, 
such as Cabernet Sauvingon or 
Pinot Noir, the vintage year can 
be important in determining if 
the wine has matured to the pro- 
per age for drinking. However, 
the vintage year is not as impor- 
tant in California as in Europe. 
Since California's climate is less 
tempermental, its wines vary 
less from year to year and tend 
to be consistently drinkable — if 
less outstanding. 

ALCOHOL: U.S. taw requires 
that alcohol by volume must ap- 
pear in the label. 

Taken tram "Maatcrlal Win*" by 
Thomii Martin. IN. 



Either generic or varietal, 
each bottle has character 



GENERIC TITLES 
Titles for blended wines which 
may appear on California 
labels : 



Burgundy 


Moselle 


Claret 


Port 


Chablis 


Rhine 


Champagne 


Sautemes 


Hock 


Sherry 


Malaga 


Tokay 


Madeira 





These names are permitted by 
law but are not used in practice. 
The label must include the place 
of origin. 

COMMON VARIETAL 

CALIFORNIA WINES 

Cabernet Sauvignon: perhaps 
the greatest of California reds, 
the Cabernet Sauvignon pro- 
duces wines with fine dark red 
color developing fruitiness as it 
matures. This is the classic 
variety for red in Bordeaux. 

Chardonnay : the classic variety 
for the whites of Burgundy, pro- 



duces wines which are highly 
perfumed, high in alcohol, and 
with great character. 

Chenin Blanc: makes white 
wines, both sweet and dry, with 
marked acidity and fruitiness 
which age well. 

Gamay : the grape used in Bea u- 
jolais, the Gamay results in a 
light red with intense color. It 
has high acidity and should be 
drunk younger than other reds. 

Gewurtztraminer: a very 
aromatic variety, which pro- 
duces a dry white wine with un- 
mistakable boquet and 
penetrating taste. 

Merlot: one of the main grapes 
of Bordeaux, this variety has 
come late to California. It pro- 
duces reds full in color and often 
rich in alcohol. 

Pinot Noir: is the classic grape 
of Burgundy where it produces 
reds vivid and deep in color, 



aromatic in bouquet, and rich in 
complexity. California Pinot 
Noirs lack some of the acidity 
and finesse of their European 
cousins, but are still very en- 
joyable and complex wines. 

Reisling: or Johannesberg 
Reisling or White Riesling in 
California, makes fine, dry 
whites in the classic German 
tradition. 

Sauvignon: often referred to as 
Fume Blanc in California, when 
ripened properly produces a 
very full-bodied white, spicey 
wine. If these grapes are im- 
properly cared for, the wines 
may become highly acidic and 
loose character rapidly. 

Zinfandel: a variety developed 
in California, it results in reds of 
two types: one light and highly 
fruity and the other often very 
alcoholic and tannic. 

From Driaktef. Wan: A CMfkM 
GaMk wtth Ratinf ■ ' by Da vat Ptafcrcarn 
Brian Caapcr *b4 Elarya Blacker, 1»7» 



HH 



*-.■■>■■.-,.» ♦.. T -». 



i . » ■ w^ 



.*>•* 



KANSAS STATE COUJQtAN, Wdn— day, January 21, 1M7 



House committee approves lottery bill 



By The Associated Press 

TOPEKA — A proposal to imple- 
ment a state-run lottery to provide 
needed funds for economic develop- 
ment, prison construction and 
statewide reappraisal hit the jackpot 
in the House Federal and State Af- 
fairs Committee, highlighting action 
Tuesday in the Kansas Legislature. 

Without dissent, the committee en- 
dorsed the bill on an unrecorded 
voice vote and sent it to the full 
House, where it will be debated next 
week. 

The bill creates a five-member lot- 
tery commission to oversee opera- 
tions of a new state agency, called 
"Kansas Lottery," which would 
operate the $1 ticket instant winner 
gambling and other, more 
sophisticated computerized games. 

Creation of a state-run lottery was 
approved by Kansas voters in the 
Nov. 4 general election as the elec- 
torate legalized gambling on the lot- 
tery and pari-mutuel wagering on 
dog and horse racing. Prior to the 
vote, the Kansas Constitution pro- 



hibited gambling on anything other 
than bingo games operated by non- 
profit and charitable organizations. 

Harley Duncan, secretary of 
revenue, has estimated the state can 
expect $100 million in ticket sales and 
$35 million in profits in a full year of 
operations. 

Under the bill, 45 percent of all 
ticket sales would be returned to the 
public in prizes and 35 percent would 
be kept by the state mainly to fund 
economic development projects. The 
remaining 20 percent would be used 
to operate the game — including 
printing tickets, advertising, paying 
a 5-6 percent commission to retail 
outlets and operating the lottery 
commission. 

Other facets of the bill would pro- 
hibit the sale of lottery tickets to 
anyone under age 18 and would 
automatically hold back lottery 
prizes of $5,000 or more whenever the 
winner owes child support, back 
taxes to the state or has committed 
welfare fraud. 

Elsewhere in the Statehouse Tues- 
day: 



Vandals deface home 
with racist scrawlings 



By The Associated Press 



HUTCHINSON - A week after she 
coordinated Hutchinson's celebra- 
tion of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s 
life, Martha Rawlins received a 
graphic reminder that King's dream 
has not been completely realized — 
vandals had scrawled racial epithets 
across three sides of her home. 

Rawlins, who has lived in Kansas 
since 1945, said, "There's so much 
racism in the state of Kansas. It was 
always here. But it took something 
like this to give rise to the chance for 
someone to show that feeling." 

Rawlins is sure there's a connec- 
tion between the King holiday obser- 
vance and the vandalism discovered 
early Sunday. One message referred 
to her as a radical, apparently in 



response to a local news story 
describing her as "an activist, if not 
a radical." 

Detective Richard Wickliffe of the 
Hutchinson Police Department said 
recent televised news coverage of 
residents of Cumming, Ga., 
assaulting civil rights marchers 
there may have played a part. 

"Someone probably jumped on the 
bandwagon for the Klan movement," 
he said. "It finally trickled down to 
Hutchinson." 

Authorities have no leads in the 
case and are hoping the local Crime 
Stoppers program will generate a 
tip. 

In the meantime, Rawlins isn't in- 
timidated. She has received support 
from businesses, individuals and 
churches. 



SKYDIVE 

Info Meeting Thursday 7 p.m. 

Union 206 

Club Meeting at 7:30 p.m. 

MEMBERS WHO WANT TO 

JUMP THIS SEMESTER 

MUST ATTEND AND PAY DUES. 
Party this Friday— attend meeting tor location 



************************************ 
i?******V**^ ********************* 



** 

i 

** 
** 

** 



MEET THE CALENDAR 

MEN 
OF K-STATE 

Autograph Party at 
Brother's 

9 p.m. Tonight 

Calendars on sale 
at the door 



i* 



i* 



[# 



**■! 



* 



* 



* 



| 

f 
§ 



—House Speaker Jim Braden, 
R-Clay Center, accused Democrats 
of trying to publicly embarrass him 
in a dispute over the names of two 
major committees. Braden changed 
the names of the tax and budget com- 
mittees and Democrats tried to over- 
ride that decision and restore their 
original names. 

Rep. Donna Whiteman, 
D-Hutchinson, led the effort citing 
the $7,000 cost of the name change. 
However, her attempt failed, 77-44. 
on a party-line vote. 

—The House Governmental 
Organization Committee was told the 
state can't effectively handle serious 
water pollution problems because it 
lacks the manpower. 

Joseph Ha r kins, director of the 
state water office, told lawmakers 
the state Department of Health and 
Environment is critically understaff- 
ed. 

Harkins said the state currently 
does not face a pollution crisis. 
However, he said he is worried about 
isolated incidents of water con- 
tamination, such as groundwater 



contamination from salt mines near 
Lyons. 

-Rep. Keith Roe, R-Mankato, in- 
troduced in the House a bill that 
would ban the burial of radioactive 
waste anywhere in Kansas The bill 
is similar to one already before the 
Legislature which would prohibit 
storage of radioactive waste in the 
salt mines near Lyons. 

Roe said the bill is a response to 
fears that a regional radioactive 
waste facility might be located in his 
area. 

"One of the hottest issues of the 
1987 session may become disposal of 
low-level radioactive waste in the 
state," Roe said. 

In fact, Roe predicted the 
Legislature will consider withdraw- 
ing from the five-state Central In- 
terstate Low-Level Radioactive 
Waste Compact before the session 
adjourns in April. 

North-central Kansas is con- 
sidered a prime location for a 
regional radioactive waste dump, 
Roe said. 



Announcing 

Spring Semester 
Weight Control Classes 

Choose an 8 a.m. or 3:30 p.m. class on 
Wednesdays. First sessions to begin 
January 28th. Classes will meet in 
Dietary Department of Lafene Student 
Health Center. 

Paid student health fees required 



Huin 




Business rism** 
r achine s 5397931 



Electronic Compact Typewriter 

SILVER REED EZ 20 

NOW YOU CAN GO FIRST CLASS 

ON BUDGET FARE! 




•Automatic Correction 
•Quick Response Time 
•Quiet Performance 



Regular $199 

now $179 

Through Feb. 4, 1987 



V 



ATTENTION 

1987-88 SENIORS 

Applications for 

BLUE KEY 

SENIOR HONORARY 

are available in 
Anderson Hall, 

Room 122 

and are due by 

4 p.m. 

Friday, February 6 



Ben Franklin 



fabric 
po*l etS 



THE BOSS SAYS: 

"CLEAN 
HOUSE!" 

So we've pulled off some shopworn merchandise, some Items that have been 
discontinued and a few things that just have not sold like we had hoped and have 
marked them . . . 7R||Vii 

25% OFF or 50% OFF or even I O 1 OFF 
Thursday through Saturday While The Dogs Last! 

Wettloop Cantor, Mwinttton, 77M»10 Iton.-Frl. 9 «.m.-fl p.m., Sat. 9 i.m.-7 p.m., Sun. 1-6 p.m. 




B *sket$ 
flowers 

Models 
Floss 
Mfootf 



Shakespearean company 
to give last performances 



By The Collegian Staff 

Members of the Royal 
Shakespeare Company will end 
their weeklong residency at 
K-State with two plays from their 
native Great Britain on Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday. 

"Pinter This Evening," a selec- 
tion of readings by the British 
playwright, Harold Pinter, will be 
at 8 p.m. Thursday in Nichols 
Theatre, said Lewis Shelton, 
associate professor of speech. 
Tickets are $5 for general admis- 
sion and $3 for students and senior 



citizens. One of Pinter's most re- 
cent plays, "Betrayal," will be 
read. 

"The Tempest," believed to be 
the last play William Shakespeare 
wrote, will be staged at 8 p.m. Fri- 
day and Saturday in McCain 
Auditorium, Shelton said. 

"The Tempest" will be 
presented in a "minimalist stag- 
ing," Shelton said, meaning the 
actors will be wearing modern 
dress and no props will be used. 
Tickets are |8 for general admis- 
sion and $4 for students and senior 
citizens. 



» ^^^»»»»»»************************* ^ 

*# 



* 
* 
* 
* 

# 

* 
* 

* 

# 

* 

# 




STUDENT BODY 

PRESIDENTIAL 

DEBATE 

Come hear the presidential 

candidates discuss the current 

campaign issues! 

Sunday, Feb. 1st 

8 p.m. 

Putnam Hall Living Room 

Co-sponsored by KSUARH and Putnam Halt 



* 

* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 



************************************ 



t 



MANAGEMENT 

DEVELOPMENT 

ANALYSTS AND INTERNS 

The Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City is 
seeking qualified candidates with business- 
related majors for positions as full time man- 
agement development analysts and summer 
interns. 

Qualified candidates should enjoy working in a 
project-oriented environmrnt and demonstrate 
good oral and written communications skills, 
strong analytical and leadership ability/ creati- 
vity and initiative. 
We will be available for campus interviews: 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24 

For more information, 
please contact your placement office or: 

Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City 

Attention: Personnel 

925 Grand Avenue 

Kansas City, Missouri 64198 



\ 



V 



(816) 881-2463 



Chicasqlla 
Cutlery 



WINTER DOG DAYS 

Jan. 29, 30, & 31 

While 
Quantities 

Last 

Reg. 
33.50 
13.00 
18.00 
16.00 
11.00 
13.00 
15.00 
11.00 

9.50 

8.00 
30.00 
35.00 
10.50 

9.10 
41.84 

7.97 



Farged Fork 

Kitchen Fork 

Lg. Turner 

Sm. Turner 

Pie/Cake Server 

Kitchen Turner 

12" Spatula 

10" Spatula 

6V2" Spatula 

4" Spreader 

Cleaver 

Carving Set 

Am. Chef Cutting Board 

Sm. Serving Board 

3 pc. Knife Set 

100S Parer 



Handi Baskets 



{in fashion colors, assorted sizes and 
shapes, and lids are available) 

9Y2"x6%"x2Y2" Reg. 45e ea 3 for «1 

10"x7"x5" Reg. 69« 2 for «1 

12"x8"x6" Reg. 1.19 $ 1 ea. 

Other sizes available at special prices 

Sale is limited to current stock only. Some items are limited 

in quantity All items are subject to prior sale. 



"We 're more than a Hardware Store ' 

I MIDWEST I 



APPLIANCE 
HARDWARE 
SERVICES 



624 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 
Manhattan, Kansas 



776-9454 




Sale 

17.99 

6.99 

9.99 

8.99 

6.50 

7.99 

7.99 

6.50 

5.99 

4.99 

17.99 

19.99 

5.99 

4.99 

26.00 

5.99 



I I I I iq«<f«« 



KANSAS STATE COU.EGIAN, Wdrt—day, Januwy 28. ttj7^ 





' DOG 
DAY 
SPECIALS 

Up to 70% OFF 



1225 Moro 
Aggieville 




Mon.-Sat. 

9:30-5:30 

Thurs. Eve. 

till 8:30 



Extra Merchandise 

Brought in for Dog Days 

Drastic Discounts 

on all games and game accessories 
D&D Books Included 



^ 



The Book Shop 

Village Plaza 
Mon.-Sat. 9-9, Sun. 9-8 




The Jean Station 



Levis 



m 



Shrink To Fit 

$14.88 

Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

Aggieville— Manhattan 



DOG DAYS 

at 

LOTS TO LOVE 

40%-70% OFF 

Regular Price Winter Fashions 
Sizes 30-52, 1614-32*4 

Blouses *$weaters * Jackets 

Coats *Skirts *Slacks 

Dresses •Lingerie • Coordinates 

First 20 customers on Thursday 

get an additional 10% off 

already low sale prices. 

1312 Westloop 

DOG DAYS HOURS 

Thurs. 8 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Fri, & Sat. 9:30 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 



WINTER 

DOG DAYS 

• Decorative Calendars 50% Off 

• K-State Sportswear 25% and 50% Off 

• Our Top 10 Hardcover Bestsellers 25% Off 




Mon.-Sat. 9-9 
Sunday 12-5 



Phone 
539-0511 





Buy 2 

Get 1 

FREE! 



Buy two items 

and get the third item 

of equal or less value FREE! 

NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER 



ftMOUS LABELS 
fOD UM 



UUWMTOWN 
Ul PUYNTZ 
Wi\ SAT WW:30 

UI1 K\ V Ml B Hi 



£ 






Aggieville's Newest Fun Store 
^620 N. Manhattan, 776-1360 



c 



f 
» 



VAUKTINE WEEN 

SPECIALS 



Vi<«frtift* MHufn l| Bflltoon 

'id 

Kiuin v r«j|< -* hftltoon ' t M 
fl»Qul»F Ul T r »fS,f,r ft t«llw* 



« 



SUPER TEE 
& MESSAGE TRANSFER 

justM.95 WOW! 

Coupon Good feb t 28. 1987 






« 

Coupon Gvoeftb 9 M 'M> 5 



ST0REWIDE 
SAVINGS 



FUR COATS 
PURSES 



50% 



off 

regular 

price 



20% OFF 



FALL AND WINTER U P ,0 

SPORTSWEAR 50% OFF 



HOLIDAY 
DRESSES 



30% OFF 




Ladies Store 
323 Poyntz, Downtown Manhattan 



DOG DAYS 
SPECIAL 

50% 

ALL 

FALL & WINTER MERCHANDISE 



nenon 



SALE STARTS THURSDAY 
DOORS OPEN AT 10:00 




SUPER 

CLOTHING 

SALE 



1208 Moro in Aggieville 

* FOR GALS 

LEE JEAMS Vs to Vi OFF 

SELECTED JEANS s 9" 

SWEATERS V2 OFF 

BLOUSES V2 OFF 

* FOR GUYS 

WINTER COATS x h to Vz OFF 

SPORT COATS up to 70% OFF 

SLACKS 20% to 50% OFF 

LEE JEANS M6" 

FASHION JEANS P^ G . R 9^ p .y2 PRICE 
FASHION JEANS & CORDS. . .'9" 

SWEATERS up to l /2 PRICE 

PLUS OTHER SPECIAL PRICES 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W dn wo fr y, January 2t, 1S87 



; 



Pryor's latest movie 
has very weak pulse 



By ANDRE KEI.LEY 
Collegia n Reviewer 

Richard Pryor hasn't had the 
best of luck with films lately. 
"Critical Condition" is sure to be 
his third straight bomb in two 
years. His well-intentioned 
remake "Brewster's Millions" 
rattled like loose change, his 
semi-autobiographical "Jo Jo 
Dancer" was met with lukewarm 
box-office action, and now he's 
definitely hit bottom with his new 
hospital-comedy. 

Film Review 

To give you an idea of how lame 
this script is, the film opens with 
Pryor's character (Eddie Lan- 
nehan ) in a sex shop looking for a 
mafia loanshark to give him 
$50,000. tn the process he bumps 
into a blind man who automatical- 
ly says, '"Scuse me, brother." 
Before meeting with the mafia 
gangster he turns to the blind man 
and says "How do I look?" 

He then finds he's stumbled 
upon an undercover police bust 
and winds up in jail. Since the 
authorities believe he's tied to the 
mobster, Eddie sees his only way 
out is an insanity plea where he 
stands on a table and attempts 
one of the worst see-how-crazy-I* 
am acts ever. 

Well, the judge is convinced. 
Eddie is sent to a psychiatric 
ward, and soon after a hurricane 
hits. During all the confusion, 
blackouts, flooding, plus a botch- 



ed escape attempt, Eddie is 
mistaken for a visiting physician 
and thus becomes Dr. Eddie Slat- 
tery. From there the film goes 
from bad to worse. 

"Critical Condition" is a typical 
formula hospital comedy. It's full 
of stale, predictable stunts and 
slapstick stock. It uses everything 
from exploding blood pressure 
kits to rubber organs in jars. In- 
credibly, they somehow managed 
to forget the whoopee cushion and 
itching powder. 

Of course a hospital comedy 
wouldn't be complete without a 
seductive patient dressed in only 
two very tiny scraps of cloth as 
she utters, "Doctor, [ hurt all ovv- 
ver," She wasn't the only one. 

And for an added bonus, the 
film throws in (surprise, surprise, 
surprise) a pregnant woman 
about to give birth. And they 
didn't even have to boil water. 

Not only is the script dull and 
lifeless, so are the characters who 
help out the good doctor. The film 
stars Randal Tex Cobb as a fellow 
psych patient who believes he's 
black. Rachel Ticotin as Pryor's 
whiney love interest, "Saturday 
Night Live" veteran Garret Mor- 
ris, and Puerto Rican singer 
Ruben Blades as an orderly nam- 
ed ( surprise again ) Luis. 

There's really no excuse for a 
film like this. Pryor is 10 times 
funnier on talk shows while pro- 
moting this film. There's just no 
cure for this comatose flick. 

If ever an argument was needed 
for euthanasia, this film is it. 



Video depicts distress of farm children 



■\ 



By STACEY NANNINGA 
Collegian Reporter 

The crisis in rural America has 
posed many economic and emotional 
problems for the farm family. But 
only recently have researchers and 
specialists realized the psychological 
difficulties affecting rural children. 

"Heartache in the Heartland" is a 
videotape designed to inform people 
of the emotional effect the rural 
crisis has had on children. The 
videotape was put together by the 
Division of Cooperative Extension 
and the College of Education. 

Chuck Smith, extension specialist 
in human and family development, 
said the goal of the videotape is to in- 
form neighbors and friends within 
the rural community of the need to 
listen to the children and to let them 
know they care. 

The issue came to light when the 
Kansas National Education Associa- 
tion conducted a survey among rural 
school teachers. Smith said the 
KNEA survey came up with alarm- 
ing results concerning children from 
farm families. 

Many teachers were worried about 
children from farm families because 
they were aware the rural crisis was 

J 1— 



affecting the children's perfor- 
mance, and they wanted to know how 
to help. 

KNEA contacted Richard Hause, 
professor of curriculum and instruc- 
tion in the College of Education, to 
formulate a plan of action. 

As the need for a program to assist 
these teachers was realized, plans 
were begun to initiate an informa- 
tional program for the teachers. 
Hause said the teachers wanted to 
know how to recognize and deal with 
distress signals. 

The goal was to have a tool to send 
to schools to help teachers unders- 
tand the needs of the students. Hause 
said that once faculty members 
began making plans for production, 
they realized that there was a need to 
not only inform teachers, but also to 
inform significant leaders within the 
community, such as 4-H organiza- 
tions and church leaders. 

"The parents are busy enough," 
Smith said. "They are working two 
jobs trying to make ends meet. They 
don't realize that the children are 
hurting because they are hurting 
themselves. 

"Many of these parents are in a 
desperate struggle. They forget to 
talk to their children; they just have 

t —r — r "■ t -v*« — * J 



too many other things on their 
minds." 

"The children want people to 
understand how they are feeling, not 
just their teachers and friends, but 
also urban and city people," Smith 
said. 

He said children want to have the 
rural crisis explained to them 
because they do not fully understand 
why their parents are hurting and 
why they are losing the farm. He 
said this was another concern ex- 
pressed by the KNEA. 

The video was first aired over the 



satellite network at K-State on Dec. 
4. 1986. The honesty of the people in 
the program was shocking to some of 
trie viewers, Smith said. 

He said the program is a real 
motivator, while it helps create a lot 
of interest in what is going on and 
how the children are being affected 
emotionally. 

Smith said "Heartache in the 
Heartland" will be broadcast on 
Channel 11 of Topeka at 7 p.m. on 
Feb. 5. After this showing the video 
will be made available for other 
cable companies. 




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on any UPC event, call 532-675 1 



UPC 



MIDDAY ARTS PRESENTS 
Tai-Chf 

A demonstration of an Oriental Performing Art by Lee-Shin Wu. 
TODAY in the Union Courtyard! 



All movies $1.75; 
KSCJ ID required; 

♦Unless otherwise stated. 



MOVIES 



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ART RENTALS 
Need some- 
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Rent a piece 
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Rentals available today 

10 a.m. -3 p.m. in the K-Slate Union Courtyard 




PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST 

Enter the 1 2th Annual 
UPC Photography Contest 



Information and 
contest rules avail- 
able now in trie 
Union Activities 
Center, 3rd Floor, 
K-State Union. 
Entries accepted 
starting Monday, 
February 16-Fnday, 
February 27. Cash 
prizes will be awar- 
ded! 





Today 7:30 p.m. Forum Hall and Tomorrow 3:30 p.m. Little Theatre, 

7:30 Forum Hall 
This is director Roman Polanski's adaptation of the great Shakespearean 
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Bushwood Country Club, bastion 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wednesday, January 28, 1987 — 11 



OSU poses 'distinct problems' 



By JENNY CHAULK 
Sports Writer 



Oklahoma State, under first-year 
head coach Leonard Hamilton, has 
had a tough go of it so far this season. 
But the Cowboys garnered one of 
their biggest wins this season Satur- 
day by snapping a six-game losing 
streak in defeating Iowa State 73-71 
in Ames. 

"I didn't come here to lose. I came 
here to make this program com- 
petitive on a national level," said 
Hamilton, who was an assistant at 
basketball powerhouse Kentucky for 
14 seasons under Joe B. Hall and Ed- 
die Sutton. 

With that in mind, K-State's men's 
basketball team — coming off a 
tough 81-78 loss at home Saturday to 
Oklahoma — will try to get back on 
the winning track Wednesday in 
Stillwater. Okla. 

The 'Cats, 13-4 overall and still in 
the chase for the Big Eight Con- 
ference title at 3-1, will meet upset- 
minded Oklahoma State. 5-12 and 1-3, 
in a USA Network televised game. 



Tipoff is scheduled for 7:35 p.m 

K-State Coach Lon Kruger said he 
isn't worried about his team being 
overconfident about playing the 
Cowboys — seventh in the Big Eight 
in team offense (70 points per game) 
and team defense (79,5 points per 
game). 

"Oklahoma State is pumped up 
after a win at Iowa State. Our 
players know they won at Ames. 
That got their attention. Plus, com- 
ing off a tough loss to Oklahoma, 
we'll be ready to go," Kruger said. 

The Cowboys, Kmger said, are 
generally a zone defense-oriented 
team. 

"OSU is pretty conservative," 
Kruger said. "They play a pretty 
compact defense. We'll want to 
spread that out and shoot the ball 
well." 

According to the Wildcats' first- 
year head coach, Oklahoma State 
has "an interesting mixture of 
players who all pose distinct pro- 
blems." 

Todd Christian, a 6-foot-6-inch 
junior guard from Newton and a two- 



year starter at Hutchinson Com- 
munity College, is the Cowboys' co- 
leading scorer with an average of 
13.6 points per game. 

"Christian can shoot so well from 
the outside," Kruger said, "as can 
Sylvester Kincheon (12.7 points per 
game) inside. Jay Davis (8.7 points 
per game) also provides good leader- 
ship at the point." 

Other probable Oklahoma State 
starters are Ray Alford ( 13.6 points 
per game) and Royce Jeffries (2.8 
points per game.) 

Probable starters for K -State are 
Mitch Richmond, Norris Coleman, 
Charles Bledsoe, Will Scott and Steve 
Henson. Kruger said he has been 
satisfied with how his players have 
accepted their roles. 

"We ask different things of dif- 
ferent individuals," Kruger said. 
"Everyone now has a pretty good 
idea of what we expect of them. We 
need to get a little better play out of 
Lance (Simmons) coming in off the 
bench, and I think we'll get it. 
Charles (Bledsoe) and Ron (Meyer), 
our pivot people, need to be more 



physical. 

One of the Wildcats' tough road 
tests of the season will be Wednesday 
when they play in Gallagher Hall — a 
6,700-seat arena that many refer to 
as the "barn." 

"Now, it really becomes important 
to play well on the road," Kruger ad- 
ded. "Stillwater's a tough place to 
play." 

NOTES: Howard Bonser, a 6-11 
freshman redshirt center from 
Manhattan, has reportedly quit the 
team. K-State coaches neither con- 
firmed nor denied the 
rumor... K-State leads the series with 
Oklahoma State 56-22, but OSU has 
won 10 of the last 13 meetings... The 
'Cats are on their way to setting a 
record for season scoring average. 
K-State averages 82.9 points per 
game, and the current mark, set by 
the 1952-53 team, is 81 points per 
game. .K-State reserve guard Lynn 
Smith is "coming along slowly," 
Kruger said, in recovering from 
stretched ligaments in his right 
ankle. He will be out for "a couple 
more games." 



Briefly In Sports 

Prep QB to sign with 'Cats 

High school quarterback Paul Watson announced Tuesday that he 
has decided to sign with K-State. 

Watson, a 6-foot-2, 185-pound quarterback, passed for more than 
5,000 yards and 52 touchdowns as a three-year starter for Park Hill 
(Mo.) High School. Last season he threw for 1,422 yards and 14 
touchdowns. 

Watson returned Monday from a visit to Florida State and said 
he'd decided to cancel trips to Missouri, Kansas and Minnesota. He 
said he will sign with the Wildcats Feb. 11, the first day high school 
seniors can sign national letters of intent. 

Bleczinski receives Big Eight honor 

The Lady Cats' Tracey Bleczinski was named the Big Eight Player 
of the Week for her efforts in K-State 's wins against Colorado and 
Kansas. 

Bleczinski, a 5-foot -8 forward, leads the Lady Cats in scoring dur- 
ing conference games with 14.0 points per game. She paced 
conference-leading K-State to a 71-61 win against Colorado with 17 
points and her 16 points was a team-high in the Kansas game. 

Against Kansas, Bleczinski nailed two free throws in the final 19 
seconds to send the game into overtime and scored five points in the 
extra period, K-State eventually outlasted the Lady Jayhawks 71-65. 



Comeback efforts miss 
as taller O-State squad 
drops Lady Cats, 75-67 



By CHASE CLARK 
Sports Writer 



According to Lady Cats* Coach Matilda 
Mossman, "it was bound to happen sooner or 
later." 

K-State's women's basketball team 
couldn't come from behind in this case and 
fell prey to the overpowering height of the 
Oklahoma State Cowgirls Tuesday at 
Stillwater, 75-67. 

The Lady Cats had seemed to be making it 
a habit to come from behind to win 
throughout the season, but were not able to 
make up a 10-point second half deficit 
against the Cowgirls. 

"We may have gotten a little bit too confi- 
dent in being able to come back after being 
behind," Mossman said. 

With the loss. K-State fell to 15-4 overall, 
and its Big Eight Conference record dropped 
to 4-2, creating a five-way tie for the con- 
ference lead between Oklahoma, Oklahoma 
State, Missouri, Nebraska and the Lady 
Cats. 

'it's anybody's race right now in the Big 
Eight," said Oklahoma State Coach Dick 
Halterman. "Every single game from now 
on really counts." 

K-State started out strong and built an 
eight-point lead late in the first half, mainly 
because the Lady Cats shot 65. 1 percent from 
the field, compared to Oklahoma State's 44 
percent. But the Cowgirls fought back with 
several key outside shots and a pair of free 
throws to tie the game at the half, 36-36. 

Tracey Bleczinski and Sue Leiding were 
the driving forces for the Lady Cats in the 
first half, scoring 10 points each. Cariisa 
Thomas collected four defensive rebounds in 
the half, moving her into the top spot on the 
Lady Cats' career rebounding chart. 

Foul trouble plagued K-State throughout 
the game as Theza Fitzpatrick went into the 
locker room with three personal fouls and 
Sue Leiding followed suit by picking up her 
third foul in the starting moments of the se- 
cond half. 

K-State finished the game with 22 fouls, 
compared to 15 for the Cowgirls. 

Oklahoma State scored on the first posses- 
sion of the second half and stole the lead from 
the Lady Cats. K State came back, and by 
the midway point had built a six-point lead, 
but things fell apart from there. 

With 8:43 left in the game, O-State tied the 
game at 53-53 and never looked back. Main- 
taining their lead, which climbed as high as 
10 points, the Cowgirls dominated the floor 
and the boards, and didn't allow K-State to 
pull any closer than five the rest of the game. 



Oklahoma State packed its defense in tight 
and forced the Lady Cats to 34 percent 
shooting from the field the second half. 
Shelia Hughes, a 6-foot-4 center for 
Oklahoma State, blocked six shots in the 
game. 

"At the end of the first half their defense 
really started to dictate what we could do of- 
fensively," Mossman said, "They made 
some changes that we didn't react to very 
welt and forced us to rush our shots a little 
bit." 

The eight-point "run at the end of the half 
definitely got us going," Halterman said. 
"We felt we weren't getting the easy shots to 
fall. So at halftime I told my kids to stick with 
the game plan and things would turn 
around." 

Top scorers for K-State were Bleczinski 
and Leiding with 15 points each. Susan 
Green. Elyse Funk and Thomas each pitched 
in eight, followed by Fitzpatrick with seven. 

Bleczinkski led the Lady Cats in reboun- 
ding with nine boards. Leiding hauled in six 
and Fitzpatrick collected five. 

Oklahoma State outrebounded the Lady 
Cats 41-32. Jamie Siess paced the Cowgirls 
with 10 boards, Shelia Hughes grabbed nine 
and Clinette Jordan had seven. 

Jordan led the Cowgirls on offense with 23 
points. Siess collected 16 points and Alisa 
Duncan, Dahrenda James and Hughes each 
scored eight. 

K-State will next see action Saturday when 
the Lady Cats play Missouri at Columbia. 
Big Eight Commissioner Carl James is cur- 
rently reviewing reports filed by Missouri 
and Oklahoma on a brawl that broke out 
following a conference game in Columbia on 
Jan. 17. 



K -STATE 
THOMAS 
BLECZINSKI 
LEIDING 
GREEN 
FITZPATRICK 
Matteucci 
Madsen 
Funk 
Davidson 
Lane 
Trtati 

O-STATE 

SIESS 

JORDAN 

KEPNER 

SOWARDS 

DUNCAN 

Daniels 

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Halftime reore: O-State 38. K-State 33 
Turnovers O-State 13. K-State 13 
Field goal percentage OStale «0, K-State 46 
Attendance: 350 




High flyer 



Staff /Gary Lytle 



Tony Coleman, freshman in pre-professional business administration, flies through a barrage of hands during an intramural basketball 
game Tuesday at the Chester E. Peters Recreation Complex. Coleman's Third Floor Marlatt team beat First Floor Moore. 52-34. 



Replacing legend 
not an easy chore 



There is a man in Manhattan 
whose feet are getting larger and 
larger by the week. 

As each basketball game 
elapses, and Lon Kruger's 
Wildcats turn in solid perfor- 
mances, K-State's first-year head 
coach comes closer to filling the 
shoes of the legendary Jack Hart- 
man. 

Kruger was a safe bet for 
Athletic Director Larry Travis to 
select as the Wildcats' coach 
when Hartman announced his 
resignation last year. Travis had 
other options, but only Kruger 
had been selected twice as the Big 
Eight Conference's Player of the 
Year and played on two K-State 
teams which won conference 
crowns. 

None of the other candidates 
had worked five years under the 
seemingly immortal Hartman 
either 




"If I can have anywhere near 
the success that (Hartman) had 
in the last 16 years, I'll feel ex- 
tremely fortunate," Kruger said 
before the 1966-87 campaign. 

Let's face it, Kruger is 
patriotic. He bleeds purple. He's 
not some roundball guru from the 
East who has tried to create a 
basketball biography called 
"How I Switched To Streetball 
and Won I" 

See COLUMN. Page 13 



Presidents' Commission to study issues 



By JENNY CHAULK 
Sports Writer 



In professional athletics, one 
always hears about player suspen- 
sions, arbitration proceedings and 
player-coach conflicts. Collegiate 
athletics are often considered to be 
immune to such problems. 

They aren't. 

The National Collegiate Athletic 
Association has the task of maintain- 
ing order in collegiate sports It does 
this through the work of committees, 
councils and an annual convention, 
which was held Jan. 6-10 in San 
Diego. 

Robert Snell. head of the Depart- 
ment of Civil Engineering, is 
K-State's faculty representative to 
the NCAA, and, according to Univer- 
sity President Jon Wefald, "speaks 
for the University" on matters con- 
cerning the NCAA. 

Snell attended the January conven- 
tion, at which 1,200 delegates acted 
upon 152 amendments to NCAA 
rules. A major decision to come out 
of the convention was the the NCAA's 
Presidents' Commission decision to 
hold a special conference. 



The 44-member Presidents' Com- 
mission will study ". .those issues 
that relate to containing the costs of 
intercollegiate athletics programs 
and to maintaining a proper balance 
between intercollegiate athletics 
programs and other institutional pro- 
grams, such issues to include the 
areas of recruiting, coaches* com- 
pensation, playing and practice 
seasons, coaching staff size and 
financial aid." 

Snell said Wefald is not a member 
of the Presidents' Commission. 
K-State and other Big Eight schools 
will be represented by University of 
Nebraska Chancellor Martin 
Massengale at the June conference 
in Dallas 

An article in the Jan. 14 issue of 
The Chronicle of Higher Education 
said some delegates at the annual 
convention viewed the special 
Presidents' convention as "...one 
more step by presidents to control 
college sports." 

K State athletic director Larry 
Travis disagreed with this state- 
ment. 

"I don't think they want to take 
control of the direction of college 



sports," Travis said. "It's more of 
wanting to be further involved in 
some of the decisions that are com- 
ing down in regard to athletics. Our 
president should know and be involv- 
ed with decisions involving our 
athletic programs." 

Snell regards the statement in The 
Chronicle of Higher Education from 
a different light. 

"Athletics is no different than any 
other department in the University," 
Snell said. "The president should be 
in control. The administration of the 
University has to be in the hands of 
the administrator. He can then 
delegate authority to whomever he 
chooses." 

Snell said amendments and rulings 
passed at the convention — such as 
the decision to cut scholarships in 
men's basketball (from 15 to 13) and 
football (from 30 to 25 for incoming 
freshmen) — which are scheduled to 
go into affect August of 1988, may not 
necessarily stand up. 

According to Snell, the Presidents' 
Commission has the power to set up 
proposals they want acted upon or 
revoted on at next year's convention 

"The presidents can set an agenda 



and have a significant influence on 
what happens." he said. 

The program used by the 
presidents at the special convention 
will contain rulings passed at the an- 
nual convention. Snell said the 
presidents could not make those rul- 
ings more severe. They could not, 
for example, decide to revote and cut 
the number of men's basketball 
scholarships to 12. 

Snell, who was part of an NCAA 
sub-committee that studied 
recruiting, said the committee 
recommended the recruiting period 
for men's basketball and football be 
cut from eight or nine months to a lit- 
tle more than four months. Snell said 
the convention approved this recom- 
mendation. 

John Slaughter, chancellor of the 
University of Maryland and chair- 
man of the Presidents' Commission, 
said in the article in The Chronicle of 
Higher Education that "the special 
summer convention will be a con- 
tinuation of the Presidents' commis- 
sion's reform effort that began at the 
19B5 special convention " 

See NCAA, Page 13 




1 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, WMkWsday, Jamiary 2S, 1MT 



Aid 



Continued from Page 



have been that this (the proposed 
education cuts) is ridiculous," he 
said. 

"Congress can say, 'We are not 
buying any of that,' and that's what I 
think will happen," Vitema said. 
"But this is the third time the presi- 
dent (Reagan) has proposed this. 

"We have to let Congress know 
we're scared and we don't want this 
to happen." 

Under the proposed funding cuts, 
the College Work Study program, the 
Supplemental Educational Oppor- 
tunity Grant, the State of Kansas 
Scholarship program and the Na- 
tional Direct Student Loan would no 
longer be available to K-State 
students, Vitema said. 

To fill the financial void left by the 
cuts, the government is testing a pro- 
gram at 10 institutions called the In 
come Contingent Loan program, he 
said. 

"The 1CL program isn't a whole lot 
different from the Guaranteed Stu- 
dent Loan program. It is similar, ex- 
cept the money would come from the 
federal government and not from a 
lending agency," Vitema said. 

The ICL program "might be 
somewhat of a nightmare to imple- 
ment," he said. "It doesn't make 
sense to wipe out these good pro- 
grams." 

One of the primary options 
students will have if financial aid is 
reduced is scholarships. 



K-State awarded about 2,600 in- 
dividual scholarships last year, 
Vitema said. The Office of Student 
Financial Assistance offers students 
a listing of hundreds of available 
scholarships totaling nearly $1.5 
million in awards. 

About 80 percent of K-State's 
scholarships are awarded on the 
basis of merit, or academic achieve- 
ment, alone, Vitema said now more 
than ever it may be necessary for 
students to keep their grades high 
enough to have the option of receiv- 
ing scholarships in case of decreased 
financial aid. 

Speaking to a group of eighth 
graders at Manhattan Middle School, 
Vitema said their parents would 
have to start putting aside about 
$4,000 to $5,000 a year in order to 
have enough money to finance their 
child's education at K-State. 

Vitema estimated that by the time 
these eighth graders are freshman in 
the 1991-92 school year, it will cost 
them about $12,500 a year to attend 
K-State. 

Vitema said students might con- 
sider getting a job or a scholarship in 
the next year or two in case the pro- 
posed student financial aid cuts are 
enacted. Students could also con- 
sider such options as ROTC or 
becoming a reservist with one of 
branches of the military, he said. 

Another alternative, Vitema said, 
was to join one of the branches of the 
military first, then obtain an educa- 
tion afterward, with the federal 
government supplying a substantial 
portion of the funding. 



Fee 



Continued from Page 1 



Under a contract to be signed with 
the Department of Intercollegiate 
Athletics in the event a fee is assess- 
ed, part-time students would not be 
eligible for reduced student ticket 
prices, but would be admitted free to 
non-revenue sports, Folk said. 

"I think we have to respect the fact 
that on this issue particularly, there 
will be the biggest difference of opi- 
nion between part-time and full-time 
students," Folk said. 

Since part-time students have the 
potential to benefit from the fee, Folk 
said, they should have to pay some 
amount. However, he proposed that 
it be decreased to $1.50 or $2. 

Not all task force members 
agreed. "I don't see your justifica- 
tion in that," Ligon said. In the past, 
fees for part-time students were one- 
half the amount assessed full-time 
students, he said. 

"I'd rather see them pay all of it, 
or none of it," said Kirk Caraway, 
task force member and senior in 
philosophy. 

"If we're going to decide not to 
assess a fee to them, I don't want to 
see them get into the games free," 
Ligon said. "Then the full-time 
students would get cheated." 

Decreasing the part-time student 
fee would have to be offset by an in- 
creased fee for full-time students, 
Marihugh said. 

Bill Majerus, task force member 
and graduate student in agronomy, 



Shuttle 



Continued from Page I 

the shuttle's solid rocket boosters are 
made; and at Rockwell International 
Corp. in Downey, Calif., manufac- 
turer of orbiter components. 

The National Air and Space 
Museum will show continuously 
"The Dream is Alive," which was 
shot during three shuttle flights. 
Resnik, Scobee and McNair appear 
in it. 

A memorial service is scheduled in 
the Fort Myer Chapel in Virginia, ad- 
jacent to Arlington National 
Cemetery, where Smith and Scobee 
are buried. 

NASA Administrator James C. 
Fletcher will speak. Representatives 
of the families, with the exception of 
McAuliffe's, are expected to attend. 



Concord, N.H., where McAuliffe 
taught high school social studies, is 
keeping its observances private. 
There will be an assembly at her 
school but no public ceremonies. 

"I feel the same way I felt at this 
time last year, and every day since," 
Barbara Morgan, runner-up in the 
teacher-in-space program, said Mon- 
day. "But you've got to look 
forward." 

A statue showing McAuliffe gazing 
up to the sky, made in part with more 
than 1 million pennies donated by 
schoolchildren, will be dedicated to- 
day in West Virginia. Bill Hopen 
melted some of the coins into the 
bronze for his $13,000 statue, which 
will be displayed at Charleston's 
Sunrise Museum. 

"Anytime children see it they will 
be reminded that tragedy can hap- 
pen, anything can happen, but that 
shouldn't stop you from reaching for 



the stars," said Melanie Vickers, a 
Kanawha County elementary 
teacher who organized the project 
and was a teacher-in-space finalist. 

At the University of Colorado, a 
ceremony will honor Onizuka, who 
earned bachelor's and master's 
degrees there. 

In Denver, an American flag 
recovered from the wreckage will be 
presented by a Boy Scout honor 
guard during a candlelight obser- 
vance. 

In Auburn, Wash., Sconce's former 
school, renamed Dick Scobee 
Elementary, will hold a memorial. 
Seattle elementary pupils will launch 
a small rocket. 

A 9-foot monument of polished 
black granite will be dedicated in 
Albany, Ga., to honor Challenger's 
crew and the three astronauts who 
died 20 years ago in the Apollo 1 fire. 




MID WEEK 
COMMUNION 

lite- 

5 



GATHERwTfH US AT NOON EVERY OTHER 

WEDNESDAY FOR COMMUNION AT 

DANF0RTH CHAPEL 

The Presbyterian Church (USA), The United 

Methodist Church, The United Church of 

Christ, The Church of the Brethren 

TODAY AT NOON 



said the majority of his constituents 
do not want to pay any more than 
they have to. 

The athletic department currently 
funds 66.83 of the allowed 89 non- 
revenue sports scholarships, which 
is about 77 percent. If the athletic fee 
funded 40 percent of those scholar- 
ships, as is now planned, the athletic 
department would have to pay the 
other 60 percent, relieving 17 percent 
of its obligations. 

Majerus also questioned whether 
the fee, if assessed, could be rescind- 
ed. "I have a feeling this will be a 
permanent fee," he said. 

Ligon said the fee could be rescind- 
ed, but added it had never happened 
before. "I doubt it will happen now," 
he said. 

Task force members decided to 
change the student referendum ques- 
tion to include the fact that summer 
school students would be exempt 
from the fee. 

The first reading of the athletic fee 
bill will take place in Student Senate 
Thursday in the Big Eight Room of 
the Union. 



Address 



Continued from Page 1 

Reagan did not say he, specifically, 
was guilty of any. Unlike his earlier 
statements on the subject, Reagan — 
in a single sentence — linked the ef- 
fort to open contacts with Iran with 
trying to win the release of the 
hostages. The administration in- 
sisted previously that release of 
hostages was merely a byproduct of 
establishing a relationship with 
"moderate" elements in Iran. 

Reagan did not offer any new 
revelations about the arms sale . 

While pledging to find out the facts 



and take any necessary action, 
Reagan said that "in debating the 
past, we must not deny ourselves 
successes of the future. Let it never 
be said of this generation of 
Americans that we became so 
obsessed with failure that we refused 
to take risks 

"Much is at stake here and the na- 
tion and the world are watching — to 
see if we go forward together in the 
national interest, or if we let par- 
tisanship weaken us," Reagan said. 
He added : ' ' Let there be no 
mistake about American policy; we 
will not sit idly by if our interests or 
our friends in the Middle East are 
threatened, nor will be yield to ter- 
rorist blackmail." 



r 



Your gift can make 
a difference. 



<> 



American Heart 
Association 

WETtf FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 




UV 



MORTAR 
CTTD BOARD 

A National Senior Honorary 

Alt juniors with a 3.3 grade average and above 

are eligible for Mortar Board. Applications 

are available in the activities center. 

Informational reception Feb. 8, 1 :30 & 3:30 

Union 207 (RSVP by Feb. 5. Call 776-0356) 

Applications due Friday, Feb.6, 5 p.m. 

Activities Center, 3rd Floor Union 



Godfather's Pizza 
Coupon Specials 

1118 Laramie 

In Aggieville by Mini-Mart 

539-5303 

Now's your chance to satisfy your pizza craving with 
great savings! Invite the gang over for a Giant 16" 
special pizza loaded with toppings. Or treat yourself to 
a delicious Hot Slice™. You'll love the taste, and the 
savings. But hurry, offer ends soon! 




Hot Sliceonly 

with this coupon 

Mon.-Fri. 11:30-1:30 Dine-in or Carryout only 



Not valid with other 
promotional offers. One 
coupon per person per visit. 
Valid only at: 1118 Laramie 

Offer expires 3/15/87. 




2fer*14! 




PLUS 
TAX 



Good for TWO Giant 16" special pizzas 
(The Super Pepperoni or The Four Topper) 
for only $14! Or, ONE for $9! 

GODFATHERS 
PIZZA 



On Sunday, your choice use this coupon or 
take advantage of our tree drink offer Sorry, 
cant do both! Not valid with Tapper or other 
promotional offers Add $1 for delivery 

Offer tiplrts 3/15/87. 



FOR? 



Valid only at: 1118 Laramie / 539-5303 



Slice 




with this coupon 

Mon.-Fri. 11:30-1:30 Dine-in or Carryout only 

Not valid with other 
promotional offers. One 
coupon per person per visit. 
Valid only at: 1118 Laramie 

Offer expires 3/15/87. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wdw— da y, Ja nuary «. ti g 



13 



! 



Column 



Continued from Page II 

The Cats haven't been a team 
characterized by rambunctious and 
disorderly play. Under Kruger they 
have played the kind of basketball 
Wildcat fans are used to — sensible, 
calculated (maybe a little more ex- 
citing than under Hartman), but 
most importantly, winning basket- 
ball. 

So, keeping in mind that recruiting 
is just as important as actual 
coaching in today's major college 
basketball climate, Kruger has my 
somewhat premature vote for the 
Big Eight's Coach of the Year. 

Kruger still has a few plateaus to 



reach. 

He first must keep raising his 
team's intensity level to elevate it to 
the once traditional Big Eight Tour- 
nament frenzy. 

Second, he has to keep on the 
recruiting trail while maintaining 
the integrity of the University's 
basketball program. 

And last, he must stay here long 
enough to coax the ghosts of basket- 
ball dynasty from the rafters of 
Ahearn Field House to the freshly in- 
stalled acoustic tiles of the Fred 
Bramlage Coliseum. 

We've all heard of the "Ahearn 
Tradition." Kruger will have the op- 
portunity to create the "Bramlage 
Tradition." 

Let's hope Kruger can coax those 
ghosts. 



Classifieds 



NCAA 



Continued from Page 11 



"Our responsibility as presidents 
and chancellors is to establish and 
maintain programs on campus," Ira 
Heyman, chancellor of the Universi- 
ty of California at Berkeley, said. 
"Our concern is to deal with the 
balance, and here, what we're talk- 
ing about, in the perspective of 
students, is athletics on one hand and 
academics on the other hand." 

Snell said good communication 
and understanding exists between 
academic and athletic personnel at 
KState. 



"I think at the present time we 
have an excellent relationship bet- 
ween our administrators and the 
athletic department," Snell said. 
"We have hired several new young 
coaches in the last 18 months or so to 
give us new enthusiasm and new 
direction." 

"However, an on-going difficulty 
with our program is money," Snell 
said. "We compete in a conference 
where everybody spends more 
money than we do. We have to be ex- 
tremely careful of how we spend our 
money because we have less of it." 

Snell said all Big Eight faculty 
representatives, athletic directors 
and presidents will be meeting 
March 6-8 in Kansas City, Mo. 



CLASSIFIED RATES 
One day: 15 words or fewer, $2.25, tS 
cents per word over 1 5; Two consecu- 
tive days: 15 words or fewar, $3.25, 20 
cents per word over 15; Three consecu- 
tive days: 15 words or lewar, $4.00, 25 
cents per word over 15; Four consecu- 
tive days: 15 words or (ewer, $4.50, 30 
cents per word over 15; Five consecu- 
tive days: 15 words or (ewer, $4.75, 35 
cents per word over 1 5. 

Classifieds are payable in advance unless cli- 
ent has an established account with Student Publi- 
cations. 

Deadline Is noon I he day before publication, 
noon FRIDAY FOR Monday s paper. ta 

Student Publications will not be responsible 
lor mote than one wrong classified insertion It is the 
advertiser's responsibility to contact the paper It an 
error exists. Noadjustmant will be made If the error 
does not alter the value of Ihe ad. 

Hems found ON CAMPUS can be advertised 
FREE (or a period not enceedlng ih we days They 
can be placed df Kedna 103 or by calling 53? obib 

Display Cleatllied Rales 

One day: S4 95 per Inch; Three constcullve 
days: 14.75 per Inch; Five consecullve days: M 511 per 
Inch, Ten consecutive days. *4 25 per inch (Deadline 
Is 4 30 p.m. two days before publication.) 

C I a 5 si I iod advs n i s' n g i s avai I abl e o n I y to I h o se 
who do not discriminate on Ihe basis of race, color 
religion, national origin, sei or ancestry. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



01 



and Uiilltm 



MARY KAY Cosmetic s-SK In care— glamour prod 
ucls. Free facial call Flons Taylor. 539-2070. Handi- 
capped accessible (76116) 

PEOPLE'S GROCERY Co-og, 81 1 Colorado, Is open 
10 everyone Wednesday and Friday. 9 am -1 p.m.. 
and Saturday, 9am -5 P m 6394811 (63.67) 

PLANNING A spnng wedding? Quality photographs 
al affordable prices, done the way you want Call 
Brad lor mote information 776-3785 (86-871 



by Doug & Dick 



ASK ME about Mary Kayl Janet Mllllken, 539-9469 
(69-881 

SPRING BREAK Hurry! Limited space available al 
these number one collegiate beach and ski desti- 
nations. South Padre Island. Deytona Beach. 
Steamboat Springs, Miami Beachifort Lauder 
date. Mustang islandfPort Aransas. Oalvaslon Is- 
land and Fort Walton Beach Call Sun chase Tour* 
Central Spring Break Toll Free Hot Linn today lor 
information and reservations— 1 -800-321-591 II 
(79-98) 

THE COMPETITION has arrived! Now available on 
campus— Avon Beauty Products Contact Kara, 
532-3291.(83 87) 

Bored with the United States? 
Gt» Internal tonal for Spring Break! 

MAZATLAN, MEXICO 

FOR $199. 

Call Shawn at 776-9533 

Informational Meeting 
Tonight 7 p.m. at Kite's 

Video tape to be shown 

HELP CHIL0REN learn The Friendship Tutoring Pro 
gram needs more tutors' Please call 778-6566 it 
you are willing lo volunteer to help a child on 
Thursday evenings (66-90) 

ONE CHOIR scholarship available lor tenor voice 
Call First Lutheran, 637 8532 (86-88) 



<>0 .lEFFltEY . 

WHKT'5 

VOUR 

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TAMDERlAY 

sn£Wi.E- 



(JUST'S.' 

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STUFF twO 

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Bloom County 



By Berke Breathed 



THE SCHMIVWuOC 
CH€5T emNPER 

wwtNmut 









By Jim Davis 



MERE I AM PALLING A6UEP 
FACE P0WN IN A 60W1 OF F0OP 




THI9 16 It- I'VE REACHEP THE 
PINNACLE OF LAZINESS ANP 
G(.0TTONV...HOW PEPRE65IN& 




Peanuts 



By Charles Schulz 



Hl.Wf NAME 15 UNUS... 
I SIT HERE IN THE 
PE5K IN FRONT OF YOU.. 


13L 



7fv 



VE BEEN SITTING 
HERE ALL YEAR ., 

Tf 




/aren't 

\OFOLP 



you KINP 
0LPF0RME? 




ftAUGH! 




ATTENTION 



02 



CHOCOLATE, VANILLA, strawberry Need 100 over 
weight people to try new Improved herbal weight 
control program with new flavors No drugs, no en 
erclse, 100*'. guaranteed Call 776-5114 or 776 
1*65 (76 961 

HERBALIFE INDEPENDENT J slribulor See us lor 
products Call 776 51 t4 or 7761465 (76 98) 

fcNOLAND, SCOTLAND, and Ireland lor under 
11.300 Travel to Europe lor It days. Includes air 
tare, meals, sightseeing and lodging Leaving Kan 
sas City May 18 Call nghl away lor more informa- 
tion 539-2 J83 185-891 



TO GIVE AWAY: 

FREE MONEY 

The $1,017 

Cold Cash Giveaway 

Listen tt. KMKF 101.7 FM 



LARGE TWO bedroom, partially I urn I shad basemen! 
apartment close lo campus. 14 1 1 Villa Lane Own 
entrance no pets, periling lot two cars Deposit 
plus rem. available now Pay own electricity Phone 
235-3550. Topeka. (79 88) 

L ARC E . WARM , I wo bedroom apart men I . I ive bloc k s 
from campus Nopels $300 Call 776-0181 (79tf) 

ADJACENT TO campus. 1124 Serf rand Nice, two 
bedroom with garage, washer and dryer VVe pay 
water. Irash. Asking $350 Call 537 1745 or 537 
4422 (62-90) 

MONT BLUE 
APARTMENTS 
Leasing for June 
•Studio, 1 & 2 Bedroom 
Apartments 
and Townhouses 
•Close to campus 
539^447 

NEAR KSU. quiel, clean, one-bedroom, furnished 
laundry, air conditioning, parking. Available June 
1 Call 776-7814 or 539-3803 (65-104) 

OUIET HILLSIDE selling. Ihird floor, nice Oldor 
home, private entrance, bath, kitchenette, bed- 
room, study room Utilities paid. JI80, prefer 
I emale( graduate, 776-3454 (85 88) 

1 Bedroom 

close to campus 

new furniture 

new paint 

$270 

call 539-1642 
or 

537^567 



NICE TWO bedroom apartmenl furnished, laundry 
facilities Near campus Free February rent 776 
8707(alter8pmi (86 8B| 



lor details 



KMCFI Q.+ 



GOVERNMENT SURPLUS' ! Overcoats. Held (ackets , 
camouflage doming, wool gloves and socks, cold 
weather bools, Carharll workwear. much morel ( 
Just 28 miles east on highway 24 Open Monday 
-Saturday. 9-5. SI Marys Surplus Sales. 1-437- 
2734 186 951 

FOR RENT-MISC 03~ 



RENTAL TYPEWRITERS-Correcling and non- 
correcting Typewriter ribbons tor sale, service 
available Hull Business Machines. 7tS North 
12th. Aggievllte. 539-1413 (27tl) 



CorreciahU: typewriters for rem on 
a daily, weekly or monthly basis. 
See us lor all your typing needs. 

776-9469 
5II Lcuvc rivvonh. iiwm>s I nun |mu oMicc 

FOR RENT, two bedroom mobile home. 1200 monlh 
plus deposit 537 7622 (85 93) 



FOR RENT-APTS 



04 



TWO BEDROOM luiury duple" Fireplace, garage 
weal of campus. M50 Call 539-4294 or 776 2536 
(6911) 

NICE ONE bedroom apartment Water, train, two- 
thirds gas paid, laundry facility Nice tor graduate 
Sludenl or couple S260rmonth 539 2482 »Mer 4 
pm (76661 

FREE RENT in January. Large two bedroom, nicety 
decorated, dishwasher, disposal No pels 1300. 
deposit required 539-1465 (85-68) 

ONE-BEDROOM, two bedroom apartments, tor 
nished or unfurnished, (new furniture) Wesfloop 
ares. Can 776 9124 (7811) 

TWO BLOCKS wesl of campus Quiet, well main, 
tamed one bedroom apartment for malure. non- 
smoking individual 1216 Lease No pals, water 
beds 5379686. 182 86) 

TWO BEDROOM lunury apartmenl. block from cam 
pus Also, live bedroom house, block and one- hall 
from campus 539 4363 (77 861 

ONE BEDROOM apsrtmenl. t20S/monlh Gas, heat, 
and water included Lease and deposit required 
Call 537 7794 evenings or weekends (78 88) 

TWO-BEDROOM lu*ury duple*, fireplace, garage. 
wesl of KSU Available now S425 Call 5394294 
(76tt) 

ONE BEDROOM, lurmshed apartment, bills paid. 

537-731 3or 539 840t One hall block from campus 

(83871 
TWO BEDROOM apartment, partially furnished, 

close to campus with an conditioning Rent 6255. 

Calf 539-7253 (83 BBi 
ONE BEDROOM apartmenl. five minutes from cam 

pus *250 per murth Call 537 7966 lor details 185 

861 



C rossword 



Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 
t Mr Anci/ 
S — i al 
(VIP? 

8 Unlit 
fabrics 

12 Knitralfi 
Isl«- 

13 IVrstmal 
ily part 

14 Htni-sp 
peats 

15 l-irgc Niini^ 

<>f CiLsIl 

17 Monster 

18 Spanish 
gentle 
man 

19 Seasoned 
21 Capon*' 

fi-aturf 

24 Irish 
si-a #>il 

25 ('reilil 
card 
lialanre 

28 r >|n-i :■ 

liiTnitif 
30 Kmrniiv 

33 — Mm 

34 Arcliii* 
llimkii 

Oft 

35 Hfforc 

36 Si iviet 

plane 

37 Skunk's 

I left' IIS*' 



38 (tin- 
cerniiiR 

39 (row 
41 Reddish 

hrovvn 
43 Stanley's 

wife 
4 ft Narrow 

groove 

so River 

duck 

51 Trie toji 

brass 

54 Spicy 

stew 

55 .Japanese 

vegetable 

56 Fencing 
sword 

57 Cleanse 

58 Diner 
check 



59 High 
tableland 
DOWN 

1 American 
socialist 

2 Great Ltke 
port 

3 Portent 

4 Most 
intimate 

5 Marsh 

6 Rude 
question? 

7 Trifles 

8 Soap plant 

9 Sequoias 

10 Farmer's 
field 

1 1 l -ei 111 

16 t; ram pus 
20 his 
mounted 



Solution lime: 25 minw, 
IStAG 




Yesiterday'fi answer 



22 Surroun- 
ded try 

23 Severity 

25 Female 
parent 

26 Yale man 

27 Large 
trans- 
actions 

29 Philip- 
pine 
Moslem 

31 Table 
scrap 

32 It 
precedes 
classic 

34 Rose or 

Cotton 
38 National 

hymn 
40 The (iod 

of Islam 

42 Ninny 

43 Pack 

44 Tissue 

45 llorder on 

47 Work as 
a cowlmy 

48 Followers 
of isms 

49 On a 
voyage 

52 Slw's 
"sweet as 
apple 
cider 

53 Sailor 




CRYPTOtJl'IP 
I 28 

A V N R KKNZZMKZ Y K Z E 

Q E O V X J VTKZgn'A R Y E F X 

T M M Y X I V T Z g 

Yesterday's Crvptoqiiip: WEARY. FAMISHEH HIE- . 
TER HAJt ONLY A SLIM CHANCE OF LOSING WEIGHT 

Today's Cryptuquip clue Z equals I. 



CITy OF Manhattans Parks S Recreation Depart 
ment is seeking to fill numerous full and part-time 
Spring and summer positions Positions include 
sports, art sre rafts, special population, and swim 
Instructors, scorekeepers, umpires day camp 
counselors, lifeguards, pool and concession work 
ers, laborers, qualified Ihealre director, piano ac 
companiat, vocal coach, puppal Ihealre stall, set 
designer and siage. sound and lighting techm 
clan Applicants should be 18 years old tor most 
positions Applications will be taken until posi 
1 1 tin* are '<"■: u 1988 employees are encouraged to 
re apply For full listing and application coma lo 
Ihe Personnel Office. City Hall tlth 1 Poyntf. 
Manhattan EOE-M/RH (86) 



FOR RENT— HOUSES 05_ 

TWO BEDROOM lunury dupiei. fireplace, garage. 

wesl ol KSU Available now S425 Call 539-429' 

(78tf) 
SHAHE THREE bedroom house close lo campus 

»H3 plus low utilities 7762450 (8688) 



FOR SALE-AUTO 



«_ 

1986 FORD F150 4x4, 351 VB 4B, supercab Low 

mileage Best orter 539-7409 IB1-9U 
1976 GRAND Prln, eicelleni condition, power 

brakes, steering, locks, windows, sun roof 537 

9282 afler 6pm 186 901 



FOR SALE-MISC 



07 



EX-60 SILVER Reed typewriter Best offer 539-7409 

(6191) 
KELSEY 12-chennei miner. *470: Mako bass guitar. 

|tB0; Kustom po.vr amp *200; prices negotiable. 

776-1925. (63.87) 
TYPEWRITER; SEARS Commentator t. erase ribbon, 

good condition. $150 539-9281 (84-88I 

ELEVENPIECE drum set for sale Slingerland 1 lew. 
nine toms. one kick, snare and hihat Flue cymbal 
stands Includes cases tor everything Also one 
AUG 012E bass drum microphone, one Sure 
SM56.andoneSurePE75L77624«-Oarren(88- 

901 
JVC CAR stereo digital nulo reverse, lader $120. or 

bast offer Can Bob 776 023* 186 881 
WOMEN'S '0 speed bicycle. 160 Jens Pede'sen. 

Cardweil 30t Call 532-6782 or F3f Jardme T*r 

race (8687) 

CORONA PC, dual disks. t28K. IBM compatible. SC 
3, mullimale Priced to sell 537-7228 186 90) 

COMMODORE 15<1 disk drive, used about sn 
months Excellent condiiion Offer Contacl Leon, 
532 4886 (86-68) 

RCA 13 Inch, blaekfwhife TV 637 9629 (86 88| 

Have* House of* .'Music 

DOD Effects 
30% Off 



327 Poynt/ 



776-7W3 



CENTREX STEREO complete with speakers, turnla 
ble. AMiFM cassette player 537 9629 (86 88) 

SHOTGUN -FOX t2 gauge, double barrel, side by 
side EnceMenl condition Case included S250 
Call 539-1371 (86-861 



10 



FOUND 

WOMEN'S WEDDING band found by Ackerl Han 
Call 776-2146 after 5 pm lo identify (84 88) 

FOUND— SET of keys cm a Bon Zilla key chain Call 
lo identity or claim S374 11 3 Ask lor Deanne I86- 
88) 



HELP WANTED 



13 



LOST !<_ 

LOST GOLD Chain necklace with angel chami II 
found, please call Oebi al 537-1570 (84 68} 

ORANGE BACKPACK eonlaining astorted tent- 
books Losl January 27 on road between KSU Un 
ion and Aggieville II found, please call Jell al 776 
0203 1 86 90) 



NOTICES 



15 



NEED MONEY for college? Wf us match you wllh 
scholarship and grant money tor which you can 
Quality For mora Information write Student Finan- 
cial Aid Services, 1613SW Chelsea Drive. Topeka 
KS 66604 (B2-9t) 

ATTENTION SCALPERS Need four KU-KSU basket 
ball lickels lot February 4 Company coming 537- 
7087 183-871 



SKYDIVE 

Info Meeting 

Thursday 7 p.m. 

Union 206 

Club meeting 

at 7:30 p.m. 

Members who want to 

jump this semester 

MUST ATTEND 

AND PAY DUES. 

Party this Friday 

Attend meeting for location 

VW REPAIRS done right Ihe first lime J a L Auto Ser- 
vice. 1494 2388 Drive a Utile and save money (86 
951 



EARN S480 weekly— H50 per hundred envelopes 
si u fled Guaranteed Homaworkers needed for 
company project stuffing envelopes and esiem 
bling materials Send stamped, sell addressed en 
veiope lo JBK Mailcompany. PO Bon 25 52. Cas 
laic, California 9»3»0 (761021 

AIRLINES, CRUISELINES hiring' Summer Career! 
Good pay Travel Call tor guide, cassette, newsser 
vice 1 1916) (Ma 4444 E>t *56 (76 135) 

THE KANSAS Cooperative Evtension Service has an 
opening for sludenl computer programmers The 
position is for 20 hours per weak, tlamtile sched 
ula. Applicants should be familiar with one ot Ihe 
following languages Pascal C. or PUI Summer 
employment is a possibility depending on per 
lormunce For more information contacl Dr Steve 
Wefch or Mary Knagp af 2 1 ' Umberger, phone 532- 
7019 A pp I leaf i on planks are available from Ihe 
above individuals or in the Computer Science Of- 
fice and will be taken during Business hours 
through February 6, 1987 (83 92) 

NEED EXTRA cashl Earn JIOOs weekly al home 
Free details! Rush salt addressed stamped enva 
lope: Sterling Enterprises. Bon 151* C Manhattan, 
KS 66502 (83 67) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT al Camp Uncoln'Camp 
Lake Hubert -Minnesota resident summer 
camps A strong commitment to working wilh chil- 
dren required, along wilh aclivity skills and leach 
ing experience Specific job information and appli 
cations are available al Career Placement 
Ol lice— H oil i Hall Sign up. m advance, lor per 
sonai interviews to be held on campus. Tuesday. 
February 3rd. and Wednesday, February 4ih. 1987 
(84 901 

BABYSITTER WANTED for 18 month old our home, 
Monday-Friday, 8- 1 p m Own i ran sport an on. n on- 
amoker, Lae school area 5398349. (65-861 

NEED PART TiMErtuff lime help al Kaw Valley Green 
houses Call 776-8565 oefween 2:30-5:00 p m on 
Thursday, January 29 (86) 

WAITRESSES. MUST be 21, at Bonkers. 1216 Lara 
mle. 537 9591 (86 90) 

STUDENTS WANTED lo help wltft taellilles mainte 
nance Of Throckmorton Greenhouse* 4-12 hours 
each per week Apply in person and be prepared lo 
i ake a compe te ncy te sf ( 30 - 45 ml nu lesl Te st score 
will determine who is caned tor an interview Work 
schedule la four hour time Mocks only lali morn- 
ing or all afternoon ontyl A lew hours every tltlh 
weekend Is required Apply In parson at O 107 (old 
dairy barn north ol Throckmorton Hall) See Tammy 
or Tom 186-871 

MOTHER'S HELPERS Live In beautiful seaside Con 
neclicul, one hour from New York City Choose 
from carefully screened families Asilat with 
chlldcare. light housekeeping Good salary dee 
room and board, transportation paid, 12 month 
■ley Care lor Kids, 203 8528111 PO Bon 27. Ro 
weylon.CT 06663 (86) 



PERSONAL 



16 



TO DARK haired guy m gray RX7 Am Haltered, but 
dont remember you Please introduce yoursel' 
Cute blonde In royal blue coat 185 861 

JORD- TODAY'S the day. but tomorrow you II pay 
We II dance all night and hang all day Have a great 
B day but no dancing on fables! Love. Ug 186) 

TO THE pups ol Oog Mow much would you pay for 
those doggies >n Ihe frame'' Be ready lo bark at 
5 30 No milkbones about if The Dognappers (861 

SKYDIVERS -GRAVITY works, even during Ihe win 
ler See Announcements (B6| 

FLASH FUOD' Warning To all men 6 '2* or taller; 

you will be eiperlencing visual and physical as 
saultlorthene*l24hoursShe'snowlegafMappy 
2»st Bordewick" £JS huh huh- huh (86| 

SHANNON - WHO D aver thought there would be a 
day. thaf I would be playing tor Misi Manhattan -K 
State 1 There s only one reason, you know it's Irue. I 
want lobe there lo cheer tor you' Congrats, buddy' 
Love-J («6V 

HEYi JUST a note to say 1 Hey Danny Marcos, 
you're a wing 1 jpms. you better study this semes 
ter I m gonna beat you' PS A good mood forever 
(Remember lhaPi And themes! important ot all to 
Shannon ynu re the besl and I love you'n Sin 
cereiy, Willie Wildcat (Alias Bill) (86) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 17_ 

MALE ROOMMATE needed- Across street from 

campus i13Srmonth plus utilities 776-9369 (76 

68) 
THREE MALES-To share iwobedroom apartmenl 

195/monlh. plus utilities Home — 539 5196 

work-776-2340atter4 p m (83-861 

MALE ROOMMATE -iwobedroom, lurmshed Mc 
CamLane Fireplace Call539 1167 alfer8pm(B2 
661 

MALE ROOMMAT E( Si wanted to share asm bedroom 
house Tola! e.pense about J160 per monlh No 
deposit, available now 776 9272 (83-87) 

ROOMMATE TO share a two bedroom partially tor- 

nished apartmenl Ctosetocampuswilhaiicondi 

Honing, renl and utilities, S150 Call 539 7253 |B3- 

881 
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to share new apartment 

Own room, St 55 per monlh plus utilities 537 434 7 

(83 8?) 
MALE ROOMMATE across street from campus al 

1230 Vat tier Ground floor private room, washen 

dryer, fireplace J135imonih plus utilities 776 

9369 (84 931 
FEMALE TO Share I wo bedroom apartmenl Lois ol 

rpomi 11 36Vmonth -split utilities. Call 776-5265 

after 6 30 pm 185-86) 

MALE ROOMMATE warned SI33plus utilities, own 

room, quiet, nice home 776- 1966 Ask for Lea 185 

881 
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanled-two. bedroom apart 

ment For more rnlormalion. call 776-0972 aMer 5 

p m (85-861 
ROOMMATE — RENT negotiable, own room, laundry 

facilities, neit to campus Call 776-3633 keep try 

•ng 166-901 
NONSMOKING FEMALE -large house, sundeck, 

washer/dryer Utilities paid own room (1T5( 

month. 5396628 (86 96 1 



SERVICES 



18 



PREGNANT? BIRTHRIGHT tan help Free preg 
nancy lest Confidential Call 537 9180 103 S 
Fourth SI , Suite 2* (llh 

PROMPT ABORTION and contraceptive services in 
Lawrence 913 841 5716 (3911) 

EXPERIENCED TYPIST— 11 IWpage Disc storage 
lei ter quality, reports, thesis, etc 532 5961 or 537 
9205. Dorinda (78-88) 

Courtesy Demonstration 

hy A ppt >int ment 
9 : .10-5 '.30 M ■ i w.1a v S;iiu rday 

nme nowrwr 



rv n.. (.« ,k. i . 



Mm Piwniz 



776-4535 



TVPINCWORD processing. Data sheets, resumes, 
letters term papers, dissertations, etc Mrs. Bur- 
den. 5391204 (80H91 

QUALITY TYPING lor si per page Contact John. 539- 
5639 (81 90) 

HEADY FOR graduation' We composeftype re 
sumea. dale sheets and lexers Resume Service. 
1 21 1 Mora. AggieviUe 537 7294 (84661 

OOALITY TYPING at economical prtea*. Oisserta 
tlons. Resumes. Theses, etc Call Caron al 532 
6294 or 776 2279 (86 951 



SUBLEASE 



20 



SUMMER SUBLEASE -three Mdroom. one and 
one hell balh. close to campus t466 Can 776 
5379 (66 90) 



WANTED TO BUY 



22 



WANTED JUDO gi lull, call 532 4802 ask lor Ri- 
chard (64-66) 

WANTED TWO tickets. KSU-KU game Call 537 
9249. ask lor Bruce (65 861 

HELP" NEED one KU -K State ticket Call Mike al 
5390905 (86901 



•wMt^Mil 



14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, 



, January 28, 1987 



Double coupons l^e 



Double Your Savings On All Manufacturer's "Cents OH" Coupons Up To And Including 50« In Value. I 

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—Bonus Special— 

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Jan. 28 Thru Feb. 3rd, 
1987. Not Included In 
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49 



With This 
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natural 
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Prices Effective 
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(Ad Not Effective In Pittsburg, Ks.) 
Limit Right* Reserved. 



Dillons Salutes Our Great 

State of Kansas in Kansas 

Day. Jan. 29. 1987. 



t 



i ■ ii r^fmm 



*** ■ ■■*«^«i««l»4^M*4l 



- 
■ 



Inside 



Weather 




Martial Art 



The Chinese martial art of 
tai chi combines silent 
rhythm and meditation. See 
Page 8. 




Partly Cloudy 

Partly cloudy and 
windy today, 20 per- 
cent chance for 
showers, high in the 
40s. Mostly clear 
tonight 




Fast Movei 



Jeff Reynolds has his main 
goal in track set — be one 
of the top 10 sprinters in 
the world. See Page 9. 



Kansas 
State 

Kansas Stale University 



Thursday 

January 29. 196? 




Merchants 



By TIM STALEV 

Collegian Reporter 



In an effort to prevent another Ag- 
gieville disturbance, a plan to control 
pedestrian traffic into Aggieville 
may be enforced following halftime 
of the K -State-University of Kansas 
football game this fall. 

This is one of the recommenda- 
tions members of the AggievUle Mer- 
chants Association will present in a 
finalized form at the March 3 
meeting of the Manhattan City Com- 
mission. The association presented 
preliminary plans to the commission 
in December, providing the basis for 
final recommendations. 

Ellie Brent, president of the 
association and owner of Woody 's 
Ladies Shop, 1225 Moro St., said the 
recommendations as they stand will 



serve as a base, but there will be a 
great deal of elaboration before the 
March 3 meeting. 

"We talked a long time with the 
police chief," she said. "We have a 
long way to go on working out the 
details with him and the legalities of 
everything. 

"This is our base," Brent said. 
"We feel this is the direction we 
should take, but we'll have to work 
out a lot of details." 

"The Aggieville group that is 
working to settle the problem is only 
an advisory group," said Jim Schot- 
tler, owner of The Casual Encounter, 
1208 Moro St. "We sifted through all 
the information, and we tried to find 
the feasible alternatives. 

"We went to the police depart- 
ment. We went to the University. We 
talked to people in Michigan; we 



talked to people in New Orleans; we 
talked to people in Dallas, and we 
sifted through all of the possibilities 
that we could come up with." 

The association came up with nine 
recommendations. 

"We will present these points to the 
city commission, and it's their deci- 
sion whether to implement them or 
to go some other direction," Schot- 
tlersaid. "We feel that (the city com- 
mission) will support us and follow 
our guidelines." 

The nine recommendations are: 

— Closing Aggieville streets to 
automobile traffic no later than 
halftime of the K-State-KU football 
game, including posting "No Park- 
ing after 2 p.m. Tow Zone" on Moro 
Street between 11th Street and North 
Manhattan Avenue. 

— Establishing controlled access 



for pedestrians into Aggieville, no 
later than halftime of the game, to 
prevent people from carrying any 
beverage containers into the area. 

— Establishing a citywide or- 
dinance prohibiting non-authorized 
access to roofs of all commercial 
buildings. 

— Placement, by March 1, of clear, 
permanent signs in Aggieville detail- 
ing city regulations concerning 
possession of open containers 
quoting both the ordinance and the 
fine. 

— Encouraging the K-State ad- 
ministration and student judicial 
board to review University policy 
outlining disciplinary measures for 
student misconduct, and urging 
them to set a strong tone in dealing 
with acts of violence and property 
destruction. 



- Strongly supporting Riley Coun- 
ty Police Department efforts to 
strictly enforce current laws and or- 
dinances of the city, county and 
state. 

— Strongly encouraging parents of 
underage children to keep them out 
of the Aggieville area that evening 
and to adhere to Manhattan's curfew 
law 

- Requesting that the University 
sponsor or promote a major enter- 
tainment event or other activities to 
provide alternatives to the Aggieville 
area that Saturday evening, 

— Developing a coordinated effort 
to clearly communicate these 
measures to the public well in ad- 
vance of the game 

Schottler said although the ex- 
ecutive committee decided on the 
final presentation, all of the Ag- 



gieville merchants contributed to the 
recommendations. 

"The merchants down here did a 
lot of the suggesting," he said. "I'd 
say 75 percent of what was used 
came directly from the merchants 
down here, who said 'We have to con- 
trol the crowd on the street. We've 
got to do this, and we cannot allow 
the beer in containers to be carried 
around.'" 

Schottler also said much of the 
responsibility for the success of next 
year's game rests with the students. 

"We need their support, their ac- 
tive involvement and especially their 
mature behavior," Schottler said. 
"We're trusting in them to show they 
are proud to be K-Staters; they are 
proud they have Ag gieville to me 

See MERCHANT. Page 12 




LEFT: Scott Rutherford, Manhattan, 
launches a model of the space shuttle 
Wednesday to commemorate the an- 
niversary or the Challenger explosion. 
ABOVE: Rutherford guides another 
rocket onto the platform he was using 
while launching his models on the in- 
tramural fields of the L.P. Washburn 
Recreational Area. 



House rejects 
approval of 
injection bill 

By The Associated Press 



Rebel troops leave Manila broadcast complex 

Inun Mcann mililarv adviser to 



By The Associated press Aauino vows to administer full punishment 

. „. ■,- ! 11 * AAA .alul * 



MANILA. Philippines - About 200 rebel 
troops agreed today to end their two-day oc- 
cupation of a broadcast complex after pro- 
government soldiers called off an assault, 
said Defense Minister Rafael lleto. 

"I'm glad to announce we have ended 
another episode in the history of distur- 
bances that have plagued us these many 
months," said lleto at a news conference also 
attended by air force Col. Oscar Canlas, 
leader of the mutineers. 

The announcement was made following a 
two-hour meeting at Camp Aguinaldo, the 
armed forces headquarters, between Canlas 
and top pro-government military officials in- 
cluding lleto and military chief of staff Gen. 
Fidel V. Ramos. 

Canlas refused to call the lifting of the 



siege a surrender, saying "we never left the 
armed forces." 

He was accompanied to the meeting at 
Camp Aguinaldo by 13 fellow mutineers, all 
armed with M-16s. He was wearing blue 
jeans, a blue T-shirt and brown civilian 
jacket. 

There was no indication that the mutineers 
had begun leaving the studios of Channel 7 
television and radio station DZBB. which 
they had occupied since early Tuesday. 

But private radio station DZRH reported 
that buses had been sent to pick up the 
mutineers. It said rebel soldiers and pro- 
Marcos civilians were still in the building. 

lleto said the question of punishment for 



the mutineers, who the government linked to 
ex-President Ferdinand E. Marcos, ■would 
be discussed later." 

Ramos said President Corazon Aquino was 
"perfectly satisfied with what was ac- 
complished" and he was sending her a full 
report. 

Aquino vowed Tuesday to punish "to the 
fullest extent of the law" hundreds of rebel 
soldiers who attempted to take over major 
media and military facilities in the capital. 

Pro-government troops surrounding the 
television and radio complex fired about a 
dozen tear gas cannisters shortly after a late 
Wednesday deadline expired, but did not at- 
tack. 



Jose Magno, military adviser to Aquino, 
said military chief of staff Gen. Fidel V. 
Ramos ordered a halt to operations against 
the rebels after a five-hour meeting with 200 
officers ranging in rank from lieutenant to 

colonel. 

Participants in the meeting told The 
Associated Press that they did not agree with 
the goals of the mutineers, and Magno said 
none of them actually refused to fight. 

However, officers said they believed an at- 
tack would threaten the unity of the military, 
and they interceded with Ramos because 
they were friends and classmates of some of 
the rebels. 

One of the officers who met with Ramos, 
Col. Gregorio Honasan. said he and his com- 
rades "were just hoping to keep the AFP 

See MANILA, Page 12 



TOPEKA — Capital punishment sup- 
porters were stunned Wednesday when the 
Kansas House failed to give tentative ap- 
proval to a bill that would make death by 
lethal injection a possible penalty for people 
convicted of premeditated murder. 

A motion to advance the bill for final 
passage failed on a vote of 59-60 after nearly 
4"^ hours of debate. Speaker Jim Braden 
said the measure remained under considera- 
tion on the House Calendar and could be 
brought to another first-round vote later. 

An aide to Braden said Wednesday night 
the speaker was "strongly leaning" toward 
bringing the bill to another vote Thursday 
Braden said earlier he doubted the matter 
would be raised again until Monday but add- 
ed any move to send the bill to a final vote 
could trigger another round of lengthy 
debate. 

Six of the 125 House members either were 
absent or were off the floor when the 
unrecorded vote was taken. Braden and two 
primary sponsors of the bill. Reps Clyde 
Graeber and Martha Jenkins, both 
R-Leavenworth, said the missing lawmakers 
could have cast pivotal votes. 

A commotion broke out on the floor after 
the results were announced, but Gov. Mike 
Hayden, who has promised to sign any death 
penalty bill that reaches his desk in proper 
form, said afterward he was not disturbed 

"I'm not angry at all." Hayden said. "I 
understand the process. I have full con- 
fidence in the speaker - that the leadership 
will get a favorable vote on it in both 
houses." 

Graeber said the additional costs of pro- 
secuting and defending capital murder cases 
coupled with the state's troubled financial 
condition may have led to an erosion of sup- 
port for the bill 

"I am surprised," Graeber said. "I did feel 
as if enough people would hang in there to 
give us 63 votes. But I anticipated for a cou- 
ple of days that the vote would be a great 
deal closer than people had expected." 

A capital punishment measure garnered 80 
votes last year when it faced a certain veto 
from former Gov. John Carlin. But House 
Majority Leader Joe Knopp said Hayden's 
pledge to sign a death penalty bill played a 

See PENALTY. Page 12 



Reagan's speech sparks 
protest from students 



By The Collegian Staff 



In response to President Ronald 
Reagan's Tuesday night State of the 
Union address. Students in Solidarity 
with Central America demonstrated 
Wednesday in front of the K-State 
Union. 

See related story Page 5 



"We wanted to take an opportunity 
early in the semester to show there is 
opposition to Reagan's foreign and 
domestic policies." said Justin 
Palmer, senior in philosophy and 
president of SISCA. "We also wanted 
to make our organization known so 
people would realize they had this 



avenue to express their feelings." 

Various speakers talked about the 
Iran arms sale, the diversion of 
funds to the Contras in Nicaragua, 
the increasing defense budget and 
the Strategic Defense Initiative. 

"We're here protesting Reagan's 
policies around the world and 
especially in Central America," said 
Kale Baldock, senior in modem 
languages. 

"We want to get people to wake up 
to the fact that Reagan is inept at his 
job and that he has been lying to us 
for a long time," Baldock said. 

"If there is more awareness, 
hopefully, once Reagan is out of of- 

See SISCA. Page 12 



Athletic fee figure creates confusion 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 



Some Athletic Fee Task Force 
members were confused when they 
read the Collegian Wednesday mor- 
ning. 

When the task force meeting end- 
ed Tuesday afternoon, the Non- 
Revenue Sports Scholarship Fee 
had been raised to $6.25. Thirty 
minutes later, the Senate Ex- 
ecutive Committee, which 
discusses proposed legislation, 
talked about a S6 fee. 

When all was said and done, 
however, the fee had been raised to 
16.50 for full-time students. The 
$3-a-semester fee for part-time 



students will remain the same. 

Kirk Caraway, senior in political 
science and task force member, 
said he attended the Senate Ex- 
ecutive Committee meeting in 
another room of the Student 
Government Services Office after 
the task force meeting adjourned. 

Committee members discussed a 
$6-a-semester fee, Caraway said 

"I left the task force meeting at 
4:30 (p.m.), went to Senate exec at 
5 (p.m.), and didn't find out about 
the $6.50 until I saw it in the Col- 
legian (Wednesday) morning," 
Caraway said. 

Because proposing an athletic fee 
bill was a majority opinion of the 
task force members, Caraway said 



he believed it was unfair to change 
the fee after the meeting without 
consulting all members. 

Two of the six sponsors of the bill 
were absent at the time of the deci- 
sion. Caraway said. They were Jen- 
nifer Leeds, sophomore in political 
science; and Becky Svaty, 
sophomore in education. Both had 
signed the bill for a $6-a-semester 
fee. 

Leeds said she found out about 
the increase Wednesday morning 

"I was a little surprised, but not 
too worried, since I wasn't at the 
whole meeting," she said. 

Student Body President Steven 
Johnson, junior in agricultural 
economics, said he was "a little 



confused" when he read the Col- 
legian Wednesday. 

"I attended the last part of the 
Senate Executive Committee 
meeting, and we talked about a $6 
fee," he said. 

Doug Folk, junior in electrical 
engineering and task force chair- 
man, said the executive committee 
should have known the fee had been 
raised. 

He said he went directly from the 
task force meeting and informed 
Jenny Johnston, secretary for stu- 
dent activities, about the change. 

"It wasn't that we changed our 
idea," Folk said. "We knew we 

See FEE. Page 12 



latMMtfk 



KANSAS »TAT1 COtLlQIAN, ThunOmf, Jiwwy », 1M7 




rieflv 



INTERNATIONAL 

Police probe possible terror ring 

MERZIG. West Germany - Police found an explosives cache after 
arresting a Lebanese terrorism suspect's brother and are in- 
vestigating whether he ran a terror ring from West Germany, of- 
ficials said Wednesday. 

The cache was hidden in a field six miles from the apartment in 
Merzig of Ali Abbas Hamadi, 28, a naturalized West German citizen 
arrested Monday night at the Frankfurt airport. His brother is 
Mohammed Ali Hamadi, 22, an alleged hijacker of a TWA jetliner in 
1985, who was arrested at the airport Jan. 13. 

West Germany's ZDF television network said Tuesday night that 
Ali Abbas Hamadi may have led a terror ring responsible for several 
bombings in France last year and a June 1965 bombing that killed 
three people at the Frankfurt airport. 

Federal officials in Bonn, speaking on condition of anonymity, said 
police were probing the possible link. "All of these things are being 
investigated, I can't tell you any more," one said. 

Ali Abbas Hamadi was arrested because police suspected he was 
involved in the abductions of two West Germans in Beirut after his 
younger brother was arrested. 

REGIONAL 

Liquor bill begins to take form 

TOPEKA - A bill to implement liquor by the drink in restaurants 
began to take shape Wednesday in the Senate Federal and State Af- 
fairs Committee with decisions to allow sale of liquor on Sundays and 
election days in liquor establishments, including restaurants and 

clubs. 

The decision to expand the liquor implementation bill sparked 
debate on the committee and angered at least one member, Sen. 
Arasmith, R-Phillipsburg. 

Arasmith objected to the bill containing anything other than 
specific language needed to implement and regulate establishments 
which will serve liquor by the drink to the public. The legislation is 
needed before a constitutional amendment adopted by voters in 
November can take effect. 

"I'm just trying to get a simple bill drafted to implement liquor by 
the drink," Arasmith said. "It should include licerusing fees and call 
for regulation by the (alcoholic beverage control)." 

However. Sen. Ed Reilly, R-Leavenworth and committee chair- 
man, said the liquor implementation legislation should contain a 
number of provisions which would enact sweeping reforms of current 
state liquor laws, including revision of the existing tax system and 
distribution network. 

Dole, Hayden to speak at dinner 

TOPEKA - U.S. Sen. Bob Dole and Gov. Mike Hayden are 
featured speakers for Kansas Republicans' annual Kansas Day din- 
ner Saturday night at the Downtown Ramada Inn here. 

The state party's annua) celebration of the state's entry into the 
union usually features an outside speaker. But this year, with Dole in 
the limelight as a leading contender for the party's presidential 
nomination in 1968 and Hayden the party's first governor in eight 
years, the GOP went with its homegrown talent. 

Other highlights include the formal announcement Friday night by 
the Native Sons and Daughters of Kansas of the selection of George 
Nettels Jr. of Pittsburg as the Kansan of the Year and a meeting 
Saturday afternoon of the Republican State Committee to elect Fred 
Logan as new state party chairman and Jack Ranson as a member 
of the GOP National Committee. 



Neil 



Dog Days Special 1 . 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Jan. 29-30-31 



Just tell one of our 
friendly employees, 
"Charles and I love 
froxen yogurt!" and 

receive a small, 
medium or large cup 

or cone of ICBIY's 

French Vanilla 
Frozen Yogurt 

(Charles' favorite) at 

50% Off 



OPEN: 

1 1 a.m. 11 a.m. Owl, 

Moon 11 a.m. Sundays 

Nautilus Tswtrt 

liiAfftovMt 



It's Dog-gone Good Stuff! 



Charles, a Wntt Highland Whit* Ter- 
rier. 1* one of our regular customers. 
His owners. Bonnie and Larry Hansen 
of Manhattan, treat him to K'BIVs 
frozen yogurt every evening. 



I Cant Believe Its 

YOGURT! 

BOSH) Yoqurt Stores 



TM 



You Name It . . . 
We've got it! 

Find out how you can get it. 
Information on the re-organization 
of a 57-year-old KSU Fraternity. 

Tuesday, Feb. 3, 7 p.m. 

Room 207 

K-State Union 

The New Fraternity 
of Alpha Kappa Lambda 



By The Associated Press 



NATIONAL 

Engineer denies using drugs in cab 

BALTIMORE — Rick Gates, the 39-year-old Conrail engineer 
whose locomotive caused the fatal Amtrak train crash Jan. 4, denies 
smoking marijuana in the cab that day. 

"No!" Gates said when asked whether he smoked in the cab with 
brakeman Edward Cromwell, a longtime friend. Gates added, "What 
I do on my own time is my own business." He declined to elaborate. 

Blood tests taken from Cromwell and Gates after the accident 
showed both had traces of marijuana in their systems at the time of 
the crash. Federal investigators have said there was "a sufficient 
amount" of marijuana to indicate recent or chronic use. 

In his first interview since the accident that killed 16 people, the 
14-year veteran engineer said a psychiatrist has been helping him 
deal with the guilt of surviving the worst accident in Amtrak history. 

Gates and Cromwell were operating the three linked locomotives 
which skidded through a crossover switch into the path of a high- 
speed Amtrak train carrying more than 600 passengers. More than 
170 people were injured. 

Gates declined to comment specifically about his actions Jan. 4. 
But he essentially stood by earlier accounts that a initial track signal 
told him to slow down and proceed through an upcoming switch. He 
also said he knew nothing about a muted cab whistle that would have 
alerted him to a second track signal telling him to stop. 

Jury acquits president of assault 

BOSTON — A jury Wednesday found the ousted president of 
Westfield State College innocent of sexually assaulting a student. 

The Suffolk Superior Court jury deliberated RMs hours before ac- 
quitting Francis J. Pilecki of two charges of indecent assault and 

battery. 

Pilecki faces a second trial on two charges stemming from an 
alleged sexual assault of a second student. Each charge carries a 
maximum penalty of five years in prison. 

The case, which was moved across the state following intense 
publicity, prompted statewide investigations into the use of college 
funds after it was disclosed that a student was secretly given a 
$10,000 payment from college funds in connection with the sexual 
assault charges. 

Pilecki hugged his wife Juliana and their son and daughter after 
the verdict was read. 

Pilecki 's attorney argued during the trial that the student, 21 at the 
time of the alleged assault, could have rebuffed the president's ad- 
vance or left the room when Pilecki, 52, asked him to disrobe and 
then grabbed his buttocks. 

The former student declined to comment on the verdict. 

Shultz calls for federal prosecution 

WASHINGTON -- A federal judge empaneled a grand jury 
Wednesday to piece together the Iran-Contra puzzle, while Secretary 
of State George P. Shultz said people responsible for channeling Ira- 
nian arms sales proceeds to Nicaraguan rebels should be prosecuted. 

Answering questions during an appearance before the House 
Budget Committee, Shultz acknowledged that U.S. anti-terrorist 
policy around the world has been thrown "slightly off stride" by the 
revelations of recent weeks, while the White House said President 
Reagan is sending national security adviser Frank Carlucci on a Cen- 
tral American fact-finding tour. 

While there were continuing recriminations about a series of 
clandestine sales of American weapons to Tehran, the former com- 
mander of U.S. military forces in Central America painted a bleak 
picture of chances that the Contra counterrevolutionaries will topple 
the leftist Sandinista regime. 



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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

U-LEAKN ii looking lor * few good volunteer! 
tor this spring Don't waste away the ipring hour* 
- be a U -LearN volunteer Call 532-6+42 or stop 
by Kolton Hall 02 

ALPHA Ml' ALPHA: All resumes are due Fri- 
day and members should contact Teresa Leighty 
Also, there will be a lield Inp Friday to Hallmark 
Members should contact Angle Rowland If in 
terealed 

MORTAR BOARD application! are available in 
Union Activities Center and are due Feb • at S 
pm 

CONGRESSIONAL TEACHER SCHOLAR- 
SHIP PROGRAM information and applications 
forms available in Rluemont 0)7. 

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT will 
be showing tapes prepared by the College Place- 
ment Council in HolU 107b Today's tapes will be 
"Interview Preparation" and "The Interview" at 
1:30 p.m "The Interview" and 'Interview 
Follow-up" will be shown at 3:30 p.m Friday 

FACULTY AND STAFF MEMBERS are in- 
vited to attend a reception honoring Darwin D 
liverance for his leadership ol Personnel Ser- 
vices at the University The reception will be 
from I to 4 p.m. Tuesday in the Union Sunflower 
Room. 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION STUDENT 
tot) NCI L applies trow are available in Bluemont 
13 and are due Monday 

TODAY 

AG AMBASSADORS meet at S p m in Waters 
137 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL 

ENGINEERS meets at 1:30 p.m In Ackert t» 

ALPHA MU ALPHA meets at 4 p.m in Union 
Stateroom 3. 



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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION STUDENT 
COUNCIL will have a reception for anyone in 
terested in participating In the council at 4:30 
p.m. in Bluemont 106 

SPEECH UNLIMITED meet* at 4 pm. In 
Nichols 102. 

SAILING CLUB meets at T p.m. In Union 308 

THETA XI LITTLE SISTERS meet at 7 pm at 
theTheta Xi house 

NATIONAL SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTURAL 

ENGINEERS meeta at 4:30 pm in Union Forum 
Hall 

GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

meets at 8:30 in Union 113. 

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH will host five ac- 
tors from the London Stage presenting "Pinter 
This Evening" at 8 p.m. in Nichols Theatre. 

PARACHUTE CLUB meet* at 7 p.m. In Union 



ANOREXIA NERVOSA AND ASSOCIATED 
DISORDERS meeta at 7:30 pm in Union 205 

TAU BETA PI meeta at 7 p.m in Durland 
Pas lay Lecture Hall 

RODEO CLUB meet* at 7 30pm in Ackert 231 

ALPHA ML' ALPHA meeta at 4 pm in Union 
Stateroom 3 

ICTHUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP meet* at 
S p.m. in Union Little Theatre 

PARACHUTE CLUB meet* at 7 pm in Union 
201. 

GRAIN SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY meet* at 

8:30 p.m in Shetlenberger ill 

ARTS AND SCIENCES AMBASSADORS meet 
■14:30 in Union MB. 




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Area north of Union may get facelift 



By TOM PKRRIN 
Collegian Reporter 



Two University presidents and 25 
years later, Bob Page may finally 
have the support he needs for his 
pet project of revamping the island 
between the K-State Union and 
Sea ton Hall. 

Page, associate professor of land- 
scape architecture, and Richard 
Forsyth, associate dean of the Col- 
lege of Architecture and Design, 
chose 12 designs for the proposal 
from projects completed by two of 
their design classes and displayed 
them last December in the Union. 

Some of the drawings include 
plans to totally relandscape the 
area from Ahearn Field House to 
Anderson Hall, while other projects 
do not cover so much space. The 
elements in some of the plans are a 
new auto arrival area, a garden 
area, a fountain, an amphitheater 
and covered eating areas. 

"Part of the concern is that the 
area is one of the most visible 
places on campus," said Page, who 



was a K-State student from 1961-*5 
and has been a professor since 1971 
"Practically every visitor to the 
campus sees the area. It's a key 
area... I think it's a great opportuni- 
ty to create a positive image." 

In addition, President Jon Wefald 
visited the class and said he wants 
to see the project become a reality 
before his tenure ends. 

"I think it would be a really nice 
thing to do," Wefald said. "George 
Miller (vice president for ad- 
ministration and finance) and I 
looked over the student projects 
and they all looked great. Any one 
of them would be good." 

The one stumbling block is the 
estimated cost of the project — $1.5 
million. That translates to about 
$15-20 per square foot, Page said. 

"The most expensive part will be 
the paved areas. It costs more to 
tear up paving than to put down 
new paving," he said. "There will 
be quite a bit involved in demoli- 
tion." 

How the money for the project 
will be raised has not yet been 



determined. However, a possibility 
exists that a fund-raising move- 
ment may be organized by this spr- 
ing. 

"The money probably won't 
come from capital improvements, 
although it could if it was put on the 
priority system," Page said. 
"There are two more ways it could 
happen. One is through a major 
fund drive, similar to what's been 
done on the dairy barn. Another 
way is a student referendum — 
another fee increase." 

While Wefald said he is en- 
thusiastic about the project, it is not 
too high on the priority list. Under- 
takings such as an art museum, 
other building and capital improve- 
ment projects and raising addi- 
tional scholarship money are 
higher priorities, he said. 

Page had presented proposals to 
former University presidents 
James A. McCain and Duane 
Acker. Now with Wefald, Page said 
he is more optimistic than ever that 
the project will come about. 

"The president seemed really en- 



thusiastic about the physical ap- 
pearance of the campus when he 
was hired," Page said. "I asked 
him if he would like to see the pro- 
ject done and he said, 'Yes.'" 

Page's students have worked on 
the project as a class assignment 
each year for the past 15 years. 

"We use it for two reasons — it's 
very handy and it's a real-life situa- 
tion that we can study every day," 
he said. 

As long as the Union has been in 
existence, the area's appearance 
has remained essentially the same. 

"It looks the same as it did 25 
years ago when I was in school 
here, except now there are bar- 
ricades (to keep cars out)," Page 
said. 

Mark Taussig, University land- 
scape architect, is another who 
likes the possibilities of the pro- 
posal. 

"I'm really excited about the 
potential," he said. "I can't say 
enough good things about the pro- 
ject." 



Project revitalizes older dwellings 



Design classes create housing program 



By The Collegian Staff 

For many people, owning a house 
in Kansas City is only a dream, but a 
program designed by K-State ar- 
chitecture professors and students 
could increase the possibility. 

Last semester, two K-State ar- 
chitecture professors and 28 students 
designed an affordable housing pro- 
gram that could revitalize older 
residential sections in Kansas City 
while allowing more people to own a 
house. 

Bob Burnham, head of the Depart- 
ment of Architecture, and Ray 
Streeter, assistant professor of ar- 
chitecture, challenged their students 
in design studio to develop affordable 
housing designs to blend in with ex- 
isting homes in older neighborhoods. 

Burnham said he developed the 
idea for the project because he is 
concerned about the rising costs of 
housing during the last 15 years. 

While various people and groups 
have shown interest, Burnham said 
he doubts any construction firm will 
adopt the program as developed by 
the design class. 

"I think there are good principles 
(in the project) that people will look 
at," he said. 

The professors developed basic 
ground rules for the project and 
defined the guidelines for the class to 



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"When we received the project, I 
don't think anyone said it couldn't be 
done, but the feeling was that it 
would be very hard to do it and still 
remain within the ground rules," 
said Mike Smith, senior in architec- 
ture and member of the design team. 

"By creating our own design 
criteria, we created our own pro- 
blems," Smith said. 

The students were forced to adhere 
to a strict budget for cost and space 
considerations, something that they 
did not have to do in previous design 
classes, he said. 

The designs had to be cost-efficient 
enough to be within the purchase 
power of a household earning $22,560, 
which was the goal targeted in the in- 
itial calculations on affordability. 
The size of the design houses had to 
be practical for average-sized lots — 
typical of the areas of Kansas City 
being considered for the projects. 

"It was a different project than we 
were used to and a challenge to deal 
with the cost and space limitations as 
opposed to 'the sky is the limit at- 
titude' on some other projects," said 
Diane Fox, senior in architecture 
and member of the design team. 

"We couldn't always use the 
materials and construction we were 
used to," Smith said "The design 
had to be less elaborate, yet still 




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seem big and remain elegant. Nor- 
mally, we have free reign to do what 
we want as far as space and 
materials are concerned." 

After many weeks of cautious pro- 
gress, a variety of designs began to 
emerge. Four different styles of 
homes, each paired with a rental 
unit, were the result. 

The concept was formulated so the 
purchaser of the home would be able 
to lease the other unit. This would 
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ing unit. 

Burnham said he hopes such 
designs can be used as a pilot pro- 
gram in Kansas City so that other 
cities will see it working and and con- 
sider the benefits it may hold for 
their respective communities. 

Although he said he's not surprised 
by what the team accomplished, 
Smith said he is happy with the final 
results. 

"It just shows what you can do 
with a little creativity, a good im- 
agination and good professors." 




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KAH1A» 8TATI COLLEOIAH, Thurtday. January », 1MT 

Americans remember 
anniversary of tragedy 



By The Associated Press 

With monuments and memorial 
services, Americans mourned the 
seven Challenger astronauts 
Wednesday on the first anniversary 
of history's worst space disaster. 

Thousands of workers at 10 Na- 
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration centers around the na- 
tion observed 73 seconds of silence, 
the length of Challenger's final 
Hight, at 11:38 a.m., the time the 
shuttle roared off an icicle-draped 
launch pad at Cape Canaveral. 
Wednesday also was cold, with a low 
of 33 degrees, a reminder of the con- 
ditions that contributed to 
Challenger's loss. 

President Reagan, in taped 
remarks played at NASA centers, 
said school teacher Christa 
McAuliffe and her six fellow 
astronauts had taught a "lesson of 
courage, spirit and love to America's 
children, and now it is for all of us to 
learn the lesson from them.'' 

Vice President George Bush met in 
his office with relatives of three of 
the astronauts. 

At the Kennedy Space Center at 
Cape Canaveral, where the 
Challenger took off on its last flight, 
some employees cried openly, other 
fought back tears and several hugg- 
ed one another, and tourist buses 
stopped in their tracks at 11:38 am. 

"A lot of people just wanted to be 
with themselves," said Terry Ed- 
dleman, a spokesman for the Mar- 
shall Space Flight Center at Hunt- 
sville, Ala. "It is not a happy day." 

Killed in the accident were Cmdr. 
Dick Scobee, Pilot Michael Smith, 
McAuliffe and crew members Judy 
Resnik, Ronald McNair, Ellison 
Onizuka and Greg Jarvis. 

Jarvis' widow, Marcia, shunned 
any public appearance on the an- 



niversary. "I'm going to spend that 
day quietly on a trail 
somewhere... because we always did 
things outside," she said. 

Junior high school students paused 
for 90 seconds at 11:38 a.m. at Lake 
City, S.C., McNair's hometown. 

Onizuka's family planned a hap- 
pier observance Saturday, gathering 
in Houston for a Hawaiian-style luau. 
"We promised Ellison a luau when 
he got back.. .and the luau never oc- 
curred," said Claude Onizuka, his 
younger brother 

Texas Gov. Bill Clements 
designated Jan. 28 as "Challenger 
Memorial Day" in his state. 
Oklahoma Gov. Henry Bellmon join- 
ed about 100 school children and 
others in 73 seconds of silence at the 
state Capitol. 

The Washington state Senate 
unanimously adopted a resolution 
honoring the "bravery and citizen- 
ship" of Scobee, a Washington 
native, and Minnesota Gov. Rudy 
Perpich announced plans for an en- 
dowed scholarship in memory of 
McAuliffe, with a goal of $9 million in 
public and private money. 

For some, it was a day to 
remember two disasters in the na- 
tion's space prorgram. 

About 90 people attended the 
dedication of a granite monument at 
the Michigan Space Center in 
Jackson, Mich., to Jarvis and to 
Roger Chaffee, who died in the 
Apollo I launch pad fire 20 years ago 
Tuesday. Both were Michigan 
natives. 

"I think each of us lost something 
on that day a year ago," former 
astronaut Jack Lousma, commander 
on the third shuttle flight, said at the 
dedication. 





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Editorial 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thursday, January 29, 1987 - 4 



Kansas 
State 



Coflfl 




EDITOR 

Jonie Trued 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Sue Dawson 
NEWS KIM TOR 

Erin Eichcr 



EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 

Deron Johnson 
PHOTO/GRAPHICS EDITOR 

Andy Nelson 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Sheila Hutinett 



KIHTOKI U HOAtit) Susan Baird. Su« Dawson. Jim Dieti, Erin Etcher, Judy Goldberg. Ron Honig, Pit Hund, 
Deron Johnwin, Judy Lundslrom, Stoll Miller. Andy Nelson. Palti Paxion, Julie Reynolds. Chris Stewart, Teresa 
Temme. Jonif Trued Unsigned editorials represent the majority opinion o( the editorial board 

Hi) COLLBBMN 1 1 SI'S m kv> is published by Student Publications Inc . Karauu Slate University, daily except 

Saturdays. Sundays, holidays and University vacation periods un-'ll Ks arc in the north wing of Kedzle Hall, phone 
&32-65S5* SECOND t I.ViS POSTAliE paid at Manhattan. Kan. 66502 SCBSUUPTION RATES: calendar year, HO, 
academic year, *35 . semester. 120 . summer term, 110. Address changes and letters to the editor should be sent to the 
Kansas Stale Collegian, Kerfzie KM. Kansas State University, Manhattan. Kan 66506 



Compromise enables 
group to produce bill 



In its long consideration of an 
athletic fee, the Athletic Fee 
Task Force has seen several 
variations on how such a levy 
would be imposed and exactly 
who would benefit from it. The 
latest — to which it has given its 
approval — is clearly the most 
workable, and the result of the 
task force's commitment is a bill 
that will be presented to Student 
Senate tonight. 

If Senate approves the 
measure, and Student Body 
President Steven Johnson doesn't 
veto it, it will come before 
students for approval during the 
Student Governing Association 
elections Feb. 10-11. 

That the bill has made it this 
far is a considerable achieve- 
ment. It took a significant 
amount of concession by the task 
force as well as Athletic Director 
Larry Travis before a version of 
the bill could even be placed 
before Senate. 



Although Travis maintains the 
fee has always been intended for 
non-revenue sports, task force 
members have said that's not 
always been clear. Furthermore, 
if it was understood the fee was to 
be for non-revenue sports, there 
was some doubt about whether 
that would always be the case. 

There was a perception that 
once in the Athletic Department's 
hands, the money could be used 
as administrators saw fit. Provi- 
sions in the proposal before 
Senate guarantee that will never 
happen. 

Although there is considerable 
debate remaining over whether 
the fee is justified and whether 
students will lend their support to 
it, it is encouraging that at least 
students will be able to vote on it, 
provided Senate passes the bill 
and Johnson doesn't veto it. 

This bill has been discussed 
long enough. It's time to give it to 
the students. 



Dwyer's suicide poses 
grisly ethics dilemma 



Pennsylvania State Treasurer 
R. Budd Dwyer, facing a jail 
term for defrauding the state, 
called a news conference Jan. 22 
to proclaim his innocence. He 
then pulled a pistol from a manila 
envelope, put it in his mouth and 
killed himself in front of 12 
reporters and photographers. 

The cameras in the room pro- 
vided a graphic record of the 
suicide, and the incident produc- 
ed a dilemma for newspaper and 
television news editors. 

The question was: Which, if 
any, of the pictures of Dwyer 
preparing to commit or actually 
committing suicide should have 
been used? Two Pennsylvania 
television stations chose to show 
Dwyer shooting himself and fall- 
ing to the floor, as did several 
newspapers across the country. 

It's true a picture can tell a 
thousand words, but the picture 
taken immediately after Dwyer 
pulled the trigger was not 



necessary to the public's 
understanding of the story and, in 
fact, its rejection was warranted 
by its graphic nature. Those 
television stations and 
newspapers which used that pic- 
ture violated standards of taste. 

Dwyer created a news story by 
killing himself at the news con- 
ference he called. In a sense, he 
used the media to tell his 
gruesome story, and it's disturb- 
ing to think others may do the 
same in the future. Although it is 
impossible for anyone to prevent 
such a morbid public display, 
news organizations should choose 
not to use the graphic pictures 
which may result. 

Yes, questions such as these 
often face editors and decisions 
must be made within minutes. 
But editors are presumed to know 
when such images are justified, 
and those who chose to use the 
pictures of Dwyer ending his own 
life made the wrong decision. 



Gov. Hayden's budget 
positive for University 



Granted, there is room for im- 
provement. 

But, budget recommendations 
made by Gov. Mike Hay den in his 
first State of the State address 
Friday left Kansas universities 
practically unscathed when com- 
pared with other state agencies. 
A major recommendation 
Hayden made was that of restor- 
ing $3.06 million to the base 
budget of the University. 

The money was K-State's share 
of the 3.8 percent state agency 
budget cuts mandated by Hayden 
in November 1986. Those cuts 
were "a serious quality blow" to 
the University, according to 
President Jon Wefald. Their 
restoration was "the No. 1 thing" 
the University had to have to 
maximize its service to the 
students, he said. 



Also recommended was a 
change in the enrollment cor- 
ridor, a regulation that bases a 
university's budget on its enroll- 
ment from the previous two 
years. Under the current regula- 
tions, K-State stands to lose more 
than $1 million on July 1, 1987, 
Wefald said. With the new recom- 
mendation, that amount would be 
decreased to about $350,000. 

Hayden's proposals, if approv- 
ed, will prevent at least $4 million 
in cuts at the University next 
year, Wefald said. 

Hayden doesn't have much 
money to work with. At a time 
when cuts and minimal budget in- 
creases are becoming daily oc- 
currences, it is refreshing to 
know our governor shows some 
commitment to higher education. 





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Repression exists in America 



When one hears about political prisoners, 
they usually associate this subject with 
repressive countries such as South Africa, El 
Salvador or the Soviet Union. Being im- 
prisoned for political beliefs is a fact of life 
people in these and many other countries 
must face every day. 

In the past, I have written about a few of 
these repressive regimes, expressing my 
disgust for their policies. My columns have 
centered mostly on those countries sup- 
ported by the United States. This isn't to imp- 
ly there is not repression on the other side of 
the fence, but I believe it to be important to 
clean our own house before we start criticiz- 
ing someone else's housework, ft is extreme- 
ly contradictory for the United States to 
criticize the Soviet Union for human rights 
violations when 50,000 civilians in Guatemala 
have been murdered in the last six years 
with the support and blessing of the U.S. 
government. 

But in my fervor to expose these gross 
violations of human rights by U.S. client 
states, I may have overlooked an important 
issue. Does the United States oppress its own 
citizens for their political beliefs? Are there 
political prisoners in the United States? Is 
there an Orwellian-style big brother govern- 
ment that "silences" political dissent from 
the American public? 

In 1978, Andrew Young, then U.S. Am- 
bassador to the United Nations and currently 
mayor of Atlanta, remarked that "hundreds, 
perhaps thousands" of people were in U.S. 
prisons because of their political beliefs and 
not because of the crimes they were charged 
with. 

What could Young be talking about? This is 
America, the land of the free. How could 
something like this go on before our very 
eyes? But after taking a closer look at the 
facts, the assertion seems to be true. 

The United States has had a long history of 
political repression. Eugene Debs and hun- 
dreds of other socialist and radical 
organizers were jailed during World War I 
and during the well-publicized raids of At- 
torney General Palmer after the war There 
were mass arrests of socialists and pacifists 
during World War II and the Korean War. 
And let us not forget the thousands of 
Japanese-Americans who were put into in- 
ternment camps and their property ex- 
propriated because of questions of their 



'l 


KIRK 
CARAWAY 

Collegian 
Columnist 


£flk 



"loyalty." Try asking why German- 
Americans were not interned also. 

There were also scores of people arrested 
under the Smith Act. This Act, passed by 
Congress in 1940, forbade the teaching or ad- 
vocacy of a revolutionary doctrine. Then, 
there were the people who were jailed for 
refusing to cooperate with the communist 
"witch hunts" of Sen. Joseph McCarthy. 

And the list goes on. U.S. prisons today 
hold many political prisoners, including 
members of groups such as the Black Libera- 
tion Army, the Black Panthers, the Republic 
of New Africa, MOVE, the American Indian 
Movement and the FALN. Scores of other 
Black, Chicano, Puerto Rican and Indian ac- 
tivists have also been jailed in recent years. 

Perhaps the most oppressed group of peo- 
ple are the American Indians Throughout 
history, we have seen Indians being 
massacred, forcibly relocated and deprived 
of their land. The U.S. government has 
broken every treaty it has ever made with 
the Indians, and to this day the government 
is trying to exterminate these native 
Americans. A Government Accounting Of- 
fice study unearthed some horrifying 
evidence of massive involuntary sterilization 
programs being conducted against Indian 
women. It was estimated that perhaps one- 
fourth of Indian women of childbearing age 
were sterilized under these programs. Soon 
there may be no Native Americans left to op- 
press. 

Then there is the case of Russell Means. 
Means, a leader of the American Indian 
Movement, has survived four assassination 
attempts, most of them occurring while 
under 24-hour FBI surveillance. He was 
charged with several trumped-up charges 
and was finally sentenced to four years in 
prison for failing to stand when the judge 
entered the courtroom where Means was at- 
tending a trial of another AIM leader. 



There also seems to be evidence "Big 
Brother" is alive and well and living in 
America. There are at least 20 different 
federal agencies that carry out surveillance 
of American citizens. It is estimated the U.S. 
government spends $10 million a year on in- 
telligence operations. This a rough estimate, 
for the Central Intelligence Agency refuses 
to disclose its budget, even to Congress. 

The CIA actually owns several businesses 
and uses the profits to fund covert opera- 
tions. It can spend this money any way it 
wants and could even keep the president in 
the dark about the way it spends its money. It 
is a dangerous situation when an agency as 
powerful as the CIA can achieve such a 
degree of self-sufficiency that cannot be con- 
trolled by any branch of government. Add to 
this an executive order signed by President 
Reagan in 1981 allowing the CIA the freedom 
to spy on American citizens inside the coun- 
try and images of George Orwell's "1984" 
become vivid. 

There is a pattern to the political repres- 
sion in this country. Those groups who press 
for changes in our economic system are 
singled out, while right-wing extremists are 
given an OK, if not direct support, to carry 
out violence against leftist or civil rights 
organizations. 

For example, in 1979 in Greensboro, N.C., 
Ku Klux Klan and Nazi members fired on a 
non-violent rally organized by the Com- 
munist Workers Party, killing five people. 
Even though they were filmed by a television 
news crew, the murderers were found inno- 
cent by an all-white jury. Further investiga- 
tions revealed that federal and local police 
agents organized the attack and provided 
automatic weapons to the attackers. 

Adam Smith, who is known as the father of 
capitalism, once said government was "in- 
stituted for the defense of the rich against the 
poor." James Madison, the fourth president 
of the United States and signatory of the Con- 
stitution, expressed this very idea in 
Federalist Paper No 10. Using this kind of 
thinking, is the U.S. government really a ma- 
jority rule democracy, or an aristocratic 
regime that protects the wealthy elite from 
the poor majority? According to these ideas, 
anyone who campaigns for redistribution of 
wealth is an enemy of the state and must be 
eliminated. Now that's some kind of political 
freedom. 



Letters 



Voice your opinion 

Editor. 

I do not believe the issue of the representa- 
tion enhancement referendum is dead yet. 
This week, there is a table in the Union for 
the petition drive. We are collecting 
signatures to put the referendum back on the 
ballot. 

By signing the petition, you are not enforc- 
ing the referendum. All you are doing is see- 
ing that the referendum is put back on the 
ballot where Senate originally put it As a 
student at this University, you are entitled to 
voice your opinion on how you are 
represented. Don't let anyone take that right 
away from you. 

Elrene Tatham 
senior in construction science 

Why kill people? 

Editor. 

Very soon we may expect the state 
Legislature to debate a bill to reintroduce the 
death penalty as a method of punishment for 
first -degree murder. The arguments against 
the death penalty as an effective method for 



dealing with violent crimes are many and 
often backed with reliable evidence: 

—The death penalty does not deter crime. 
It cannot be proven that a state which passes 
a death penalty bill will show a reduction in 
its murder rate. 

—The death penalty is subject to human 
fallibility just as all legal practices are. 
Since 1900. at least 25 innocent people have 
been executed. 

—Evidence strongly indicates a racial bias 
in the application of the death penalty, with 
the killers of whites being far more frequent- 
ly convicted than those who kill blacks. 

—Studies of other states clearly show that 
the reinstatement of the death penalty costs 
many millions of dollars beyond the cost of a 
non-capital punishment system. The 
Legislature is debating the bill without any 
cost analysis by the state, even though 
evidence has been provided suggesting a 
figure in excess of $50 million before a single 
execution takes place. 

Can Kansas afford — morally or financial- 
ly—to reintroduce such legislation on the 
basis of an emotional desire to exhort 
retribution on behalf of the victim? To the 
very best of my knowledge, that is the only 
argument put forward in favor of reinstating 
the death penalty. 



Yes, society needs to overcome the tragic 
consequences of violent crime, and yes, peo- 
ple should be able to conduct their lawful 
business protected from such despicable 
crimes 

It is vitally important that senators and 
representatives are made aware of the facts. 
After all, why do we kill people who kilt peo- 
ple to show people that killing people is 



wrong ' 



HoK cr Beaman 

post -doctoral research associate 

Department of Chemistry 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

pertaining to matters of public interest 
are encouraged All letters must be 
typewritten or neatly printed and 
signed by the author and should not 
exceed 300 words. The author's major, 
classification or other identification 
and a telephone number where the 
author can be reached during business 
hours must be included 

Letters may be brought to Kedzie 116 
or mailed to the Collegian Editorial 
Page Editor, Kedzie 103. Kansas State 
University. Manhattan, Kan. 66506 



■ w i i ■ p— tm 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Thursday, January 29, 1907 



DREAM House provides help for unwed mothers in need 



By KRISTt BARANCIK 
Collegian Reporter 

While most people have dreams, 
few have the ability or opportunity to 
turn their dreams into reality. Billye 
Martin is doing just that through 
Dream House Inc. 

Martin's DREAM — Delivering 
Refuge, Encouragement and 
Assistance to Mothers in need — 
Dream House Inc., is a non-profit 
organization which helps unwed 
mothers through counseling and con- 
tinuing education programs. 

"Our dream is to help (unwed 
mothers) through, see more babies 
bom and help the mothers fulfill 



their dream to continue their educa- 
tion with a guilt -free conscience," 
Martin said. 

"We have plans to be in operation 
within two months," she said. The 
exact opening date will not be set un- 
til office facilities are secured. 

Martin's vision of the Dream 
House is "a sorority -type situation 
that is a maternity home for college- 
age women." 

Dream House will not have an ac- 
tual residence for unwed mothers 
immediately. The board of directors 
is working on the fine points of the 
counseling and educational systems 
which will be available in an office 
setting. 



"We want to set up our own classes 
because it is uncomfortable to be in a 
class of glowing young couples when 
you're trying to do this on your own," 
Martin said. Counseling will be 
available in prenatal care, natural 
childbirth and postnatal care. 

Dream House is an alternative to 
abortion, she said. 

"We know (abortion) happens, and 
we forget to take it seriously. We 
become numb," Martin said. She 
said statistics show about 4,000 
reported abortions every day in the 
United States. 

"We all have our lives to live," she 
said, "but we have to leave a small 
wound open so that we remain sen- 



sitive to the situation." 

"Dream House is a visible option 
to young women," said Chaplain 
Norbert F. Dlabal, of St. Isidores 
Catholic Church. Dlabal is a member 
of the board of directors of Dream 
House. 

"As soon as we have a place of 
operation, we are going to start 
advertising as aggressively as our 
money will allow," Martin said. "We 
want to compete with anti-life adver- 
tising and balance the scale as much 
as we can." 

"Hopefully, funding will be pretty 
broad-based, not just local," Dlabal 
said. Funding will be based on per- 
sonal contributions and grants. 



"We intend to depend primarily on 
the pro-life Christian community," 
Martin said. 

Martin said she was active in pro- 
life organizations in Hutchinson until 
she moved to Manhattan 24 years 
ago. 

"I wanted to carry on pro-life ac- 
tivities here. There wasn't a 
mainstream Right to Life organiza- 
tion here so I organized one in 
January 1986." She began plans for 
Dream House, a separate organiza- 
tion, in April 1986. 

Dream House is currently taking 
applications for volunteer workers in 
its counseling services, she said. 



Dream House is governed by a 
board of directors, including David 
DeShazo, family life pastor at 
Westview Community Church, and 
Glenda Gould, member of the 
Assembly of God Church, along with 
Martin and Dlabal. 

Although Dream House is separate 
from other organizations in Manhat- 
tan, members can refer people to 
Birthright shepherding homes in 
which families volunteer to house 
unwed mothers. 

"We aren't trying to duplicate any 
services," Martin said. "We are just 
trying to work with the other ser- 
vices and fill in the blanks." 



Protesters face surveillance, investigator says 



By JUDY GOLDBERG 
Staff Writer 

While peaceful protesters marched 
in front of the Union Wednesday 
afternoon, an investigator for the 
K-State Police Department took pic- 
tures of the event. 

Investigator Richard Hen-man 
said the police department records 
most campus events where crowds 
gather. 

"It's nothing new," he said. "We 
always take pictures of anything of 
protest — peaceful or not." 

About 30 members of Students in 



Solidarity with Central America 
marched in response to President 
Ronald Reagan's State of the Union 
Address, aired Tuesday night. 
Members expressed their discontent 
with Reagan's stand on issues in- 
cluding aid to Nicaraguan Contra 
rebels, increased military spending 
and the Strategic Defense Initiative. 

Herrman said photographs are 
taken of participants and audience 
members at organized protests and 
Landon Lectures. University basket- 
ball and football games are also 
recorded on videotape, he said. 

"It's just an investigative pro- 



cedure," he said. "If violence erupts, 
we have a record of those involved." 

While videos of games are taped 
over after the event ends, 
photographs are kept on file. 

Pictures in the "intelligence file" 
are for future use if a related inci- 
dent occurs, Herrman said 

Photos are dated and titled for 
each event but subjects are not iden- 
tified unless necessary, he said. 

Although he could not recall any 
occurrences where photographs 
were used to identify someone after a 
protest, Herrman said they would be 
beneficial if, for example, an au- 



dience member began harassing a 
protester. With a description of the 
agitator, the photo could be used to 
confirm his identity. 

Pictures did help the police depart- 
ment identify two or three illegal 
aliens who attended a Landon Lec- 
ture given by Sheikh Ahmed Zaki 
Yamani in 1983, Herrman said. 

He said the department's reason 
for taking photographs has nothing 
to do with its opinion of the 
demonstrators. 

"They've got their right to 
demonstrate, and there was nothing 
wrong with that protest today." 



SGA releases official list of candidates 



By The Collegian Staff 

The Student Governing Associa- 
tion released Wednesday the official 
list of candidates seeking election to 
Student Body President, the Board of 
Student Publications and Student 
Senate. 

Seeking the Student Body Presi- 
dent position are: Bill the Cat 
(Stephen Bell, sophomore in nuclear 
engineering); Michelle Benoit, 
junior in agricultural economics; 
Kent Bradley, junior in nutrition 
science; and Brett Bromich, senior 



Four file for student body president 



in marketing. 

Board of Student Publications can- 
didates are; Wes Alexander, junior 
in radio-television; Jada 
Allerheiligen, junior in journalism 
and mass communications; Jim 
Dietz, junior in journalism and mass 
communications; Laura Johnson, 
freshman in math education; Mike 
Riley, senior in political science; and 
Judi Walter, junior in journalism and 



1 



- ■>- 



mass communications 

Eleven students in the College of 
Agriculture filed for five seats. 

Three students in the College of Ar- 
chitecture and Design filed for three 
seats. 

The College of Arts and Sciences 
has 12 seats, and 29 students filed for 
those positions. 

In the College of Business Ad- 
ministration, 19 students filed for 



eight seats. 

Five students in the College of 
Education filed for three seats 

The College of Engineering has 
eight seats, and 18 students will run 
for those positions. 

Two students filed for six seats in 
the Graduate School . 

The College of Human Ecology has 
six students filing for three seats 

One student in the College of 
Veterinary Medicine filed for one 
seat. 

Student elections are Feb 10 and 
11. 



Senate to scrutinize 
$6.50 athletic fee bill 



By MICHAEL MORRIS 
Collegian Reporter 



The non-revenue sports scholar- 
ship fee referendum will go 
through its first reading tonight at 
Student Senate. 

If the bill is enacted, the student 
body will vote during general 
elections Feb. 10-11 on the athletic 
fee, increasing full-time student 
fees by $6.50 a semester and $3 a 
semester for part-time students 

The resolution also states that 
no student monies will be col 
lected until Department of Inter- 
collegiate Athletics officials sign 
an agreement stating the fees will 
only be used for non revenue 
sports scholarships. 

Senate will also complete its 
discussion and vote on the propos- 
ed resolution objecting to the ser- 
vice charge on the gross receipts 
of student-funded agencies. 

The resolution is being propos- 
ed because of the University's an- 
nouncement of a 3 percent service 
charge on the K -State Union, Stu- 
dent Publications Inc. and Lafene 
Student Health Center. 



The directors of the three agen- 
cies, Walt Smith of the Union, Dr. 
Robert Tout of Lafene and David 
Adams of Student Publications 
will attend tonight's meeting. 

If the resolution passes. Senate 
will then encourage the directors 
of the agencies to adjust the pro- 
posed changes with the Universi- 
ty, based on a prior agreement 
between the University and the 
agencies 

The resolution recommends 
that the proposed changes be 
withheld until an agreement is 
reached between the University 
administration and the agencies 

Senate will explore measures to 
arrange the service charge as a 
temporary measure and to ar- 
range an independent audit of the 
three agencies in order to account 
for the actual value of the ser 
vices, the resolution states. 

Also on the agenda, Student 
Body President Steven Johnson, 
junior in agricultural economics, 
is a sponsor of a proposal that 
would allow a student body presi 
dent to be eligible for re-election 



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Introspection inspires new works 

'Different' 
art vessels 




Staff/Brett Hacker 



Jan Massad, teacher's aide at Emporia State University, will have her works 
displayed at the Ambry Art Gallery In West Stadium through Feb. 12. 



on display 

By The Collegian Staff 

Round, rust-colored clay vessels 
with sprinkles and coils of various 
earth tones sit on display platforms 
throughout the tiny Ambry art 
gallery at the north end of West 
Stadium. 

Ceramic artist Jan Massad, 
graduate student in art at Emporia 
State University and creator of the 
vessels, set up her display Tuesday 
afternoon. She said her ceramics are 
done "pretty much with the in- 
vestigation of the inner and outer 
relationship of vessels with space." 

Inspiration comes through "strong 
introspection of we ourselves and our 
relationship to the space around us," 
Massad said. 

The pieces were completed last fall 
and don't follow a distinct pattern 
but come from four, five or six dif- 
ferent directions, the artist said. 

"This exhibit is something dif- 
ferent from what I've done in the 
past, this doesn't even look like what 
I was doing a year ago," Massad 
said. "I've enjoyed having the 
chance to put it up at K-State." 

Massad presented a talk to art 
students at the opening of her 
display. Much of the inspiration for 
her ceramic pieces, she said, has 
come from working with Angelo Gar- 
zio, K-State professor of art. 

The vessel display, sponsored by 
the Department of Art, will be on 
display through Feb. 12. 



Nicaraguans release accused spy 



By The Associated Press 

MIAMI - Sam Nesley Hall, a 
self-styled soldier of fortune accus- 
ed of spying in Nicaragua, flew 
home to the United States today 
after telling the Nicaraguan people 
he was sorry he "tried to ambush 
them." 

He left Nicaragua this morning 
and stopped in San Jose, Costa 
Rica, before arriving in Miami 
about 12:25 p.m. 

Hall departed the plane with 
several men and was led quickly to 
a waiting van, which then drove 
away. Hall did not acknowledge 
shouts from numerous reporters 
crowded behind a fence near the 
runway. 

Rep. Tony Hall, D-Ohio was in 
Miami today to greet his brother, 
said Michael Gessel, a spokesman 
in the Ohio congressman's office. 
Gessel said he did not know the 
brothers' plans afterward. 

Airport spokeswoman Joanne 
Fabatino said she understood 



Hall's brother was waiting for him 
in the van. 

Earlier, Hall had delivered a par- 
ting message to Nicaragua. 

"I just have one thing to say to 
the Nicaraguan people," the 
49-year-old Hall told reporters 
before boarding a flight to Costa 
Rica this morning after being 
released from custody. "I'm sorry I 
tried to ambush them." 

Hall, who has been held since his 
arrest Dec. 12, said he was not 
mistreated during his detention, 
adding, "Prison authorities were 
terrific. They treated me like a 
human being." 

Asked how he felt about going 
home, he said, "Terrific." 

The Sandinistas say Hall was 
released because he is mentally 
unstable. He was brought to San- 
dino International Airport this mor- 
ning and put aboard a flight for 
Costa Rica on the Nicaraguan na- 
tional airline, accompanied by 
family lawyer Gary Froelich of 
Dayton, Ohio, who arrived in 



Managua on Monday night. 

Froelich said Halls family was 
trying to arrange for him to receive 
a complete medical examination in 
Miami before going on to Dayton. 

Hall was arrested in a restricted 
area of the Punta Huete air base, 13 
miles northeast of Managua. 
Authorities said they found maps 
and sketches of military targets, 
crudely drawn on hotel stationery, 
stuffed in his socks, and threatened 
to try him for espionage. 

But Javier Chamorro Mora, 
deputy foreign minister, told a 
news conference Tuesday night 
that Hall was being released ' 'so he 
may be taken to the United States 
and receive adequate treatment at 
a specialized institution." 

He said a psychiatrist and a 
clinical psychologist had found Hall 
to be "a very unstable 
personality... inclined to carry out 
acts that could end his own life." 

As a result, he said, Hall had been 
"declared exempt from respon- 
sibility" 



Senator wants investigation 
of low-level waste agreement 



'Dear teacher': Excuses run gamut 



By The Associated Press 

LEESVILLE, La, — "My son is 
under the doctor's care and should 
not take P.E. today," one parent 
wrote "Please execute him." 

That death sentence was in- 
advertently recommended in a note 
which a parent who was in a hurry or 
possessed of an uncertain 
vocabulary wrote to excuse a child's 
absence from school in Vernon 
Parish. 

Duplicated copies of some of the 
parish's more astonishing excuse 
notes were given out at a School 
Board meeting this month. 



"Some of them were obviously 
made up by students," said Richard 
Carter, assistant principal of 
Leesville High School. But most, he 
said, were probably legitimate ex- 
cuses written by parents in the rural 
northwest Louisiana parish. 

In these samples, names were 
replaced with either Fred or Mary to 
protect innocent and guilty alike. 

One parent appeared to have taken 
drastic action: "Please excuse Mary 
for being absent. She was sick and I 
had her shot." 

Another had a more comprehen- 
sive request: "Please excuse Fred 
for being. It was his father's fault." 



"Please ackuse Fred being absent 
on Jan. 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 and 33," 
wrote a parent who lives by an 
unusual calendar. 

"Mary was absent from school 
yesterday as she was having a 
gangover," wrote one who apparent- 
ly expected the school to be tolerant 
of social follies. 

In a confusion of office work and 
medical terms, one parent wrote: 
"Please excuse Mary from Jim 
yesterday. She is administrating." 

And several had a racier tone: 

"Please excuse Fred for being ab- 
sent. He had a cold and could not 
breed well." 



By The Associated Press 

TOPEKA — Sen. Paul Feleciano, 
D-Wichita, Wednesday asked At- 
torney General Robert T. Stephan to 
study the Central Interstate Low- 
Level Radioactive Compact and see 
what it would take for Kansas to drop 
out of the five-state agreement. 

In a letter to the attorney general, 
Feleciano said he was concerned 
Kansas would be picked to host a 
low-level radioactive waste dump for 
the five states which are members of 
the compact — Kansas, Nebraska, 
Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana. 

"First, I request that you deter- 
mine whether low-level radioactive 
wastes are considered hazardous 
wastes under Kansas law and, if so, 
whether the ban on the below-ground 
disposal of hazardous wastes 
precludes the below-ground disposal 
of low-level radioactive wastes in 
Kansas," Feleciano told Stephan in 
the letter. 

"Second, I would like to know if it 
is possible for Kansas to prohibit the 
'disposal' of low-level radioactive 
waste in the state, but allow for the 
'storage' of such wastes without 



coming into conflict with the com- 
pact. 

"Finally, I would like to know the 
fiscal impact, both short-term and 
long-term, of Kansas withdrawing 
from the compact." 

Feleciano's action follows by one 
day the introduction of a bill in the 
House which would ban the burial of 
radioactive waste anywhere in the 
state. 

Rep. Keith Roe, RMankato, spon- 
sored the bill, which is similar to a 
bill already before the Legislature 
that would prohibit storage of 
radioactive wastes in the salt mines 
near Lyons, 

The bills and letter, reactions to a 
recent disclosure of studies being 
conducted for the compact, have 
made it clear north-central Kansas 
is the most likely location for a 
regional radioactive waste dump. 

Feleciano is particularly upset 
that the compact will not make the 
final decision over which state will 
host a low-level radioactive waste 



dump. The final decision will be left 
to private developers who will con- 
tract with the commission to run the 
dump. 

"To allow the developer to select 
the site, independent of the political 
process, is to nullify the fundamental 
processes for decision-making in a 
Democratic society," Feleciano 
said. "I am also concerned about the 
technology to be used to 'dispose' of 
low- level radioactive wastes. Since 
there are no proven methods for the 
disposal of such wastes without en- 
vironmental damage, we must be 
very cautious about the technology 
we accept for management of low- 
level wastes." 

Feleciano asked Stephan to assign 
the investigation "top priority" 
because of the pending decision on a 
host state for the dump and the possi- 
ble need to enact legislation prior to 
the end of the 90-day legislative ses- 
sion. 

The five states signed the compact 
agreement in 1982 




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Discover LAUNDRY LAND 

Drop off your laundry ... we'll do it for you 
7 days a week! 

Bring us ail your washables 

for same day wash -dry-fold laundry service. 

Dry cleaning and self service also available. 

Try our quick professional service, you'll be glad you did! 

V 2048 N. Tuttle Creek Blvd. 776-1939 J} 



Thursday, January 29, 1987 

For information on any UPC event, call 532-6571 



GUITAR & AMP 

SALE 



•J^BrAJBW «i 



TOaye^ House of rjTVIusic 

n, iitn,r inH Dirr flutter I Accnnc fluaila-hlp 



fENOER 
GIBSON 
CRATE 



776-7983 



Guitar and Bass Guitar Lessons Available 

327 POYNTZ, MANHATTAN 



UPC 



All they wanted 
was their chance 
to be men... 
and he gave it 
to them. 



wrjii.H , .'A\V'fa 



Musi 



A John Wayne Classic! In this 
movie, Wilt Anderson (John 
Wayne) Hires iocal boys to drive 
cattle to the market. On the 
harrowing drive, the boys are 
transformed into men. 

Saturday, January 31st, 2 p.m., 
and Sunday, February 1st, 2 & 
7 p.m. All shows in Forum Hall 
$1.50; KSU ID Required; Unrated 



nsmcDi 



Ferris Bueller is no 
ordinary student, and 
the day that Ferris takes 
off is no ordinary day! 
Stars Matthew 
Broderick. 

Tomorrow and 
Saturday, 7 & 9:30 
p.m.. Forum Hall $1.75; 
KSU ID Required; Rated 
PG-13 



LEISURE 
RULES 

MATTHEW BRODERICK 

FERRIS 
BUELLER'S 

PAYOFF 

One man's struggle to take it easy. 

[PD-lil-BB- A PARAMOUNT PICTURE V? 



• luM^nHHMi 



" k-state union 
Jupc feature films 



THE SNOBS AGAINSTTHESLOBS. 



GET INVOLVED ON CAMPUS 
WITH THE UNION PROGRAM COUNCIL 

Volunteers Wanted: Individuals interested in 
serving for the *87'88 year as committee chairs to 
coordinate social, recreational, educational and 
cultural programs for the benefit of the KSU 
community. 

Union Program Council is a student volunteer organization 
imllilllillg of approximately 100 students who select, plan and 
promote 500 programs Ifilms, trips, entertainers and more) 
each academic year UPC is broken up inio nine committees: 
Pmmohons, Travel. Special Events. Outdoor Recreation. 
Kaleidoscope Films, Issues and Ideas. Feature Films, Eclectic 
Entertainment. Arts 

President- Presides over the UPC Executive Council, sils on 
the Union Governing Board, coordinates events and activities 
thai involve the total UPC membership Our highest leadership 
posiiiun. 

Arts— Coordinates Union An Gallery exhibitors, print sales, 
an remaJs. the Arts and Crafts Sale, the Photo Contest and 
Mid-Day Am. 

Eclectic Entertainment— Provides the best in live c me ruin 
mem, professional comedians, singers and student entertain - 
mem 



CBETH 



*Shakespeare Festival* 
This is director Roman Polanski 's adaptation of 
the great Shakespearean tragedy. It contains all 
the classic tragic elements of murder, guilt, and 
revenge. 



Issues and Ideas— Selects, organizes and publicizes lectures 
highlighting current cvenis or popular topics of inierest. 
Organizes the "Let's Talk About ll" series 

Kaleidoscope Films— Selects and publicizes innovative, 
artistic and internal lonal films on Wednesdays and Thursdays 
in the Union. They also show weekend matinees and midnight 
films 

Travel— Coordinates and publicizes winter and spring break 
trips for the K Slate com mu nil y Sells an International Student 
ID card and maintains a Travel Resource Center 

Feature Films— Selects and BattfeaM popular films every 
Friday and Saturday nighl in the Union. They also show 
weekend matinees and midnighl films. 



Today, 3:30 p.m. in Little Theatre, and 
tonight, 7:30 p.m. in Forum Hall, $1.75. 
KSU ID required, unrated 




Special Events— Selects coordinates and publicizes desired 
events or activities that do not fall under another committee 
area, including dances, the Activities Carnival, "Laic Night ai 
the K -State Union" and some types of live entertain merit . 

Promotions— Deals with ihc visual image of the entire council. 
Pastes up Collegian ads Publishes ihc "Programmer" 

calendar and other publications to promoie UPC 

Outdoor Recreation— Offers a wide variety of outdoor -related 
trips and programs based on a "cooperative wilderness 
adventure "structure . 

Applications Tor Leadership (Commiliee Chairs) are available 
now. Deadline: 4 p.m. Friday, February Wh. 

Applications may be picked up and submitted in the Activities 
Center, 3rd floor of the K-Sute Union For mure information, 
call 532-6571. 



Caddyshack 

A Jon Prterf Production 

"CADDYSHACK" 

CHEVY CHASE- RODNEY DANGERFIELD 

TED KNIGHT MICHAEL O'KEEFE 

M BILL MURRAY-Ci/t 

Orajnal Sonp bj KINNt lOGGlNS • Mu« Compoitd t>r JOHNNY MANDEl 

Wntten br MIAN fXTf li-MLHuW S HAROLD RAMtS 1 DOUGLAS UNNET 

Exkimm Produce* JON PETIM- Produced t* DOUGLAS KINNET 

Dmcudbr HAROLD RAMIS .►-.„.»• 

i k-state unio n 

Jupc feature films 



[■ 



3 



Buthwood Country Club, bastion ot thm wall-todo, 
rmgularly host* a hilarious mrrmy ot eccentric 
mmmbmn and zmny ampioymo*. It ramify bacomas a 
tram-tor all whan ftodnay Dangartrald arrtvaa! 

Tomorrow and Saturday. Midnight, Forum Hall 
$1.78; KSU ID Required; Hated ft 



» , 



>^W*"**i 






Visitors to Nicaragua 
discuss trip at dinner 



By The Collegian Staff 

Back from a visit to Central 
America, Manhattan residents spoke 
Wednesday at a rice and beans din- 
ner sponsored by the Manhattan 
Alliance On Central America. 

As a result of the trip, MACA 
began a sister city relationship with 
Nindiri, Nicaragua, through the 
Friendship Cities program. 

"Nindiri is unofficially our sister 
city," said Cia Verschelden, a 
delegate from the Friendship Cities 
project. "It is a totally non-political, 
non-partisan arrangement, and has 
no administrative affiliation. 

"This is important because people 
really want to get involved, but shy 
away from getting into the political 
aspect of all of this. 

"We try very hard to provide 
cultural exchanges with the people, 
not the government," Verschelden 
said. 

Verschelden said MACA's monthly 
meetings were important because 
the forum helps bring people with 
mutual interests together. 



"Our goals are to raise people's 
awareness of the Central American 
issue," she said. "We also provide 
the means for people to react, to take 
part in political lobbying, and to ac- 
tually do something about the situa- 
tion." 

Denise Grimm, senior in 
economics and the only K-State stu- 
dent who went on the Nicaraguan 
trip, attended the dinner. 

Grimm, a member of Students in 
Solidarity with Central America, 
said she and other members of the 
group will be speaking at various liv- 
ing groups in the next few weeks. 

"We will be taking our slides we 
took while in Nicaragua," Grimm 
said, "and we'll try to educate the 
student body on exactly what is hap- 
pening." 

The dinner at St. Isidore's Catholic 
Church had its biggest turnout since 
MACA's organization two years ago. 

"There is no doubt that the recent 
trip and the slide presentation are of 
interest to the people," said 
Margaret Conrow, treasurer of 
MACA. 



Communists expel 
top-ranked leaders 



By The Associated Press 



MOSCOW - The Communist Par- 
ty expelled two old guard stalwarts 
from its highest ranks Wednesday 
and gave Kremlin leader Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev greater control of the 
powerful secretariat, but it did not 
make some reforms he proposed. 

The two-day general assembly of 
more than 300 Centra] Committee 
members did not fulfill the rumors of 
dramatic leadership changes, and its 
results suggested disagreement over 
some programs Gorbachev included 
in his lengthy speech Tuesday. 

It endorsed Gorbachev's insistence 
on accelerated economic change and 
more openness in Soviet society, 
however. A final resolution said, 
"there is nowhere we can retreat." 

No mention was made in the 
resolution of the 55-year-old leader's 
call for more than one candidate and 
secret ballots in elections for the 
regional party committee, which in- 
dicated lack of unanimity on such a 
significant change in party practice. 

Removal of the former 
Kazakhstan party leader, 74-year-old 
Dinmukhamed A. Kunaev, from the 
ruling Politburo eliminated one of 
the last Brezhnev-era leaders from 
the national leadership. 

The Central Committee, which 
groups the top party members from 
Moscow and the 15 Soviet republics, 
also retired 72-year-old Mikhail S. Zi- 
myanin from the party secretariat 



"for health reasons." 

Kunaev's ouster was considered a 
foregone conclusion after his 
dismissal Dec. 16 as party chief of 
Kazakhstan, a Central Asian 
republic the state-run press had call- 
ed a hotbed of corruption and 
mismanagment. 

Replacement of Kunaev, a 
Kazakh, with Gennady Kolbin. an 
ethnic Russian, prompted student 
riots in Alma Ata, the Kazakhstan 
capital. 

Alexander N. Yakovlev, propagan- 
da chief of the Kremlin, was elevated 
to candidate membership of the 
Politburo. 

No successor to Kunaev's full 
membership was named and the 
Politburo now has 11 full, voting 
members. Kunaev joined the Polit- 
buro in 1972 during the regime of 
Leonid I. Brezhnev. 

Vladimir V. Shcherbitsky, party 
boss of the Ukrainian, is the leading 
representative of the old guard still 
on the Politburo. Although his 
removal has been rumored for some 
time, he not only iurvived the 
general assembly but delivered a 
speech Tuesday. 

The official news agency Tass said 
the Central Committee chose two 
new party secretaries, alternate 
Politburo member Nikolai N. 
Slyunkov and Anatoly I. Lukyanov. 

Those appointments, along with Zi- 
myanin's removal, mean all party 
secretary posts now are held by Gor- 
bachev appointees. 




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* 

* 

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* 
* 



STUDENT BODY 

PRESIDENTIAL 

DEBATE 

Come hear the presidential 

candidates discuss the current 

campaign issues! 

Sunday, Feb. 1st 

8 p.m. 

Putnam Hall Living Room 

Co-sponsored by KSUARH and Putnam Hall 



* 
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************************************ 




f The All-Campus 
Leadership 
Workshop 
is coming 

Saturday, Jan. 31st is the day for . . 
Leadership: Accept the Challenge 

K-State Union Little Theatre 
8:30-11:55 a.m. 

Programs Include: 

Delegation Goal Setting 

Motivation Leadership Styles 

Attitudes SGA Funding 

Burnout Campus Issues 

Everyone Welcome 

Sponsored by 

Student Governing Association, 

University Activities Board, 

Mortar Board 




J 



1 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thursday, January 2». MW 



Rolling Thunder's Biggest_Ever 



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Announcing Rolling Thunder's biggest 30-Hour Sale beginning at 9 a.m. 
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Digital Loudspeakers 



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9-10 a.m. Sat., Jan. 31 



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Head Unit Alarm interface 

Burglar Alarm Systems tor your car 
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Noon-1 p.m. Fri., Jan. 30 

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Cassette Deck 

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All items may not be exactly as pictured. 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tnureday, Jamiir* 2», 19B7 



Martial art 
coordinates 
body, mind 

By ERIN ML L (AH V 
Collegian Reporter 

Lee Shih Wu moved in silent 
rhythm and meditation Wednesday 
in the Union Courtyard during her tat 
chi demonstration, the first in a 
series of Union Program Council 
Midday Arts presentations. 

Wu has been demonstrating the 
Chinese martial art, tai chi (pro- 
nounced tie jee), for six years. A 
native of Taiwan, Wu has been a resi- 
dent of Manhattan for four years. 

"One thousand years ago the exer- 
cise ( tai chi) began for a healthy con- 
cern," Wu said. "It brings back 
nature." 

The leaders of the Taoist Move- 
ment began practicing tai chi nearly 
1,000 years ago to emphasize total 
physical control of the inner body. 
Chang San-Feng is the founding 
father of tai chi, Wu said. 

The words tai chi refer to the 
Chinese symbol yin yang, she said. 
The yin yang is a circle parted in the 
middle with a serpentine line. One 
half of the circle is dark and 
represents femininity, a negative 
connotation. The other half is white 
and represents masculinity, a 
positive connotation The two 
necessary and complementary parts 
of the symbol help bring one back to 
nature, Wu said. 

Tai Chi requires no music or 
words. It is neither a dance nor a per- 
forming art. Tai chi is a total body 
exercise combined with self-defense, 
she said. 

"You have no weapons for 
defense," Wu said. "Your collective 
inner energy makes a more powerful 
defense because you're in tune with 
your body." 

Unlike most jazzercise and aerobic 
workouts, tai chi requires no 
strenuous calisthenics. The exercise 
stresses extreme slowness, silence 
and one continual movement from 
beginning to end without breaks or 
pauses, she said, Wu compared the 
entire movement to an ocean tide. 

"Whatever benefits you want out 
of tai chi you can get," Wu said. "It 
( tai chi ) develops humans' inner soul 
to live a more rigorous and healthy 
life." 

In Wu's native country, the 




Chamber modifies its stance 
on possible uses for windfall 



Stiff/ Andy Nelson 

Lee Shih Wu demonstrates tai chi, a Chinese martial art, in the Union Cour- 
tyard Wednesday at the Union Program Council Midday Arts program. 



Chinese practice tai chi in parks, 
homes and large outdoor squares at 
least twice a day. Wu exercises mor- 
nings and nights for 30-40 minutes. 

"The more slow, the more (your 
body) benefits," she said. 

Tai chi benefits both the young and 
the old. 

"It is very good for the elderly 
because it is soft," Wu said. "It is 
very good for the young because it 
establishes balance. Balance helps 
younger (children) gain power." 



There are 108 forms in tai chi, she 
said. The forms are repetitions or 
variations of 37 basic movements 
The forms have names such as 
"stork spreads wings," and "hit 
tiger at right" to describe 
movements. 

Wu taught a tai chi course through 
University For Man last semester. 
She didn't offer the course this 
semester, but continues to meet for 
recreation with other tai chi en- 
thusiasts every Tuesday night in 
Seaton Hall. 



By The Associated Press 

TOPEKA — The Kansas Chamber 
of Commerce and Industry has 
modified its stand on whether state 
government should return to tax- 
payers all of the revenue windfall the 
state stands to gain as a result of 
federal income tax reform. 

KCCI's board of directors 
previously advocated returning all of 
the windfall — estimated at between 
$100 million and $150 million — to 
taxpayers. 

However, the board recently 
adopted a resolution which ad- 
vocates adjusting both individual in- 
come tax rates and corporation in- 
come tax rates "to remain com- 
petitive with surrounding states." 

Bud Grant, vice president of KCCI, 
said today that means the state 
chamber believes the state can keep 
some of the windfall, but should give 
some of it back to the taxpayers who 
pay it in order to make Kansas' tax 
structure more competitive with 
those of Missouri, Oklahoma, Col- 
orado and Nebraska . 

Kansas will see its income tax 
revenues increase if it doesn't adjust 
its tax rates or amend its exemptions 
and deductions to match the new 
federal tax code. Without the ad- 
justments, Kansas taxpayers will 
pay less in federal taxes, meaning 
they will have less of a deduction on 
their state tax returns and thus will 
have a higher state tax liability. 

Gov. Mike Hayden, in his proposed 
Fiscal Year 1988 budget delivered to 
the Legislature last Friday, built a 
$129 million general fund balance by 
retaining all of the federal tax wind- 
fall in the state treasury. He 
estimated the windfall at $143 
million, meaning if all the windfall 
were returned to taxpayers, his 
budget would have a $14 million 
deficit. 

Hayden said during his successful 
campaign for governor last year that 
he advocated giving back all of the 
windfall except for modest amounts 
needed to exempt Social Security in- 
come from state taxation and to ex- 
pand the mineral severance tax ex- 
emption to cover more stripper oil 
wells. 

"Kansas, in most respects, is a 



high-tax state in the region, especial- 
ly in competition with Missouri, so 
economic development considera- 
tions suggest taking a serious look at 
lowering effective tax rates," KCCI 
said in its "Tax Letter" mailed to 
members this month. 

Grant said Kansas' corporate tax 
rate of 6.75 percent is "significantly 
higher" than the average 5 percent 
rates of surrounding states, and that 
Kansas' top individual income tax 
rate of 9 percent is "somewhat 
higher" than those of neighboring 
states. 

"We're not necessarily saying the 
money that comes to the state as a 
result of the windfall should be 
returned dollar for dollar to the peo- 
ple who pay it — mainly those mak- 
ing $50,000 and above," Grant said. 

"What we're saying is they should 
use this windfall prudently to 



enhance the business climate of Kan- 
sas, both from a personal and cor- 
porate income tax position 

"We were violently opposed, and 
still are, to the 'booster tax.' If you 
spend this windfall, you're simply 
imposing another booster tax on 
Kansas taxpayers. 

"We've simply got to address these 
economic development issues, and 
our board feels we've got to do 
something positive with this money 
and not simply have it disappear into 
the state general fund.'' 

The booster tax was the name ap- 
plied to a tax change the Legislature 
put into effect for tax years 1984 and 
1985. It generated about $45 million a 
year additional income tax revenue 
by limiting the amount of federal in- 
come taxes which Kansas taxpayers 
could claim as deductions on their 
state returns. 




LAFLIN 

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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thursday, January 29, 1987 - 9 



'Cats outgun OSU Cowboys, S8-77 



By JENNY 4 H All K 
Sports Writer 



Confidence and composure down the 
stretch helped K-State's men's basketball 
team garner its second Big Eight Conference 
victory on the road by defeating Oklahoma 
State, 88-77, Wednesday in Stillwater. 

Free throw shooting was the vital factor in 
the Wildcats' win. The 'Cats were 34 for 40 
from the charity stripe, while Oklahoma 
State was 8 for 16 from the line. K -State's 85 
percent shooting from the line overshadowed 
a career-high 23-point performance from 
OSU's Jay Davis and the Cowboys' 60.8 per- 
cent shooting from the field. 

K-State guard Will Scott continued his 
record-setting pace, going five for five from 
the line. He has made 27 straight free shots 
and has not missed a free throw attempt 
since the Wichita State game Dec. 13. 



"Our concentration was good down the 
stretch," said Assistant Coach Dana Altaian. 
"If you're going to shoot free throws well, it 
makes it awful tough on teams." 

The Cowboys, however, were tough on the 
'Cats for a short while in the second half. 
They battled back from a 15-point deficit in 
the first half to tie the game at 50-50 with 
13:03 left in the game. 

It was all K-State, though, for almost the 
entire first half. Mitch Richmond hit two 
three-pointers and Scott hit one to propel the 
'Cats to an early 9-0 lead. 

Hot outside shooting pulled Oklahoma 
State out of its zone defense and into a man- 
to-man, which hampered the 'Cats. K-State 
battled the tough Cowboys' defense and took 
a 36-29 lead into the lockerroom at halftime. 

"We've got to learn to respond to physical 
play a little bit better," Coach Lon Kruger 
said. 



K-State forward Norm Coleman was 
double- and triple-teamed for most of the 
period and finished the half with just six 
points. But freshman guard Steve Henson 
stepped in and scored 11 points to pick up the 
slack and finished the game with a career- 
high 19 points. 

The second half saw the Cowboys slowly 
nibble at the Wildcats' lead. K-State was 
outscored, 21-14, in the first seven minutes of 
the period. Todd Christian, Oklahoma State's 
leading scorer, came alive and scored 17 
second-half points after scoring just two in 
the first half. So did the "Sarge," who led the 
'Cats with 22 points. 

"At that point (when Oklahoma State tied 
the score), everybody was looking around, 
wanting someone to pick them up," Kruger 
said. "Norris really did an excellent job of 
stepping forward and getting a couple of 
baskets." 



K-State pulled ahead for good, 55-54, on a 
three-point shot by Will Scott. After a 
technical foul was called on the Oklahoma 
State coach Leonard Hamilton, the Cowboys 
scored seven unanswered points to pull 
within two, 64-62 Eighteen straight free 
throws by the Cats ensured the 11-point vic- 
tory. 

"Any time you go on the road and get 
ahead, it's likely it'll be close at some point," 
Kruger said. "I'm really pleased with the 
way we pulled away when we had to." 

With the win, K-State improved its record 
to 14-4 overall and 4-1 in conference play. 
Oklahoma State dropped to 5-13 overall and 
1-4 in the Big Eight. 

K-State's Ron Meyer did not suit up for the 
game. He has a bruised thigh and Kruger 
said his status for Sunday's game with 
Missouri is questionable. 



K STATE 


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Halftime score: K Stale 36. O-State 20 
Turnover* K-State IB. Stale 18 
Field goal percentage K-State 49 3, O State 60 1 
Attendance: 6.750 



Dallas star 
hits 10,000 
in 5th year 

By The Associated Press 

DALLAS — Mark Aguirre's 
10,000th NBA point came on a hustl- 
ing play which the temperamental 
forward might not have made in the 
past. 

Washington's Charles Jones stuff- 
ed a shot back in the Dallas 
Mavericks' face in the first quarter 
of Tuesday night's 118-113 victory for 
the Bullets. 

Aguirre fought for the ball again 
then put it in the basket over the 
bewildered Jones. 

In just five short years, Aguirre. a 
former All-America n at DePaul, had 
become the first player on the expan- 
sion Mavericks to reach the 10,000 
point plateau. 

Referee Earl Strom stopped the 
game as the 17,007 fans in Reunion 
Arena applauded Aguirre and gave 
the ball to Dallas Coach Dick Motta 
for safekeeping. 

The loss took out most of the joy for 
Aguirre, who was named this week to 
the Western Conference NBA Ali- 
Star team for the second time 

Aguirre said "getting 10,000 points 
doesn't mean an awful lot at the mo- 
ment. I wish we'd gotten all that gar- 
bage — the 10,000 points and All-Star 
team — over sooner. To me, it's a 
distraction and I'm glad it's over 
with." 

Aguirre has taken on a business- 
like demeanor this season. 

His celebrated feuds with Dallas 
Coach Dick Motta have been put on 
the back burner. 

As a result, the Mavericks are 
leading the Midwest Division and 
were 11 games over .500 at mid- 
season. 

"I'm very relaxed and dedicating 
myself to concetrating on my main 
goal — winning games and getting 
into the NBA championship series," 
Aguirre said. 

Aguirre averaged 24.4 points per 
game over 406 games to reach the 
10,000 point goal. 

He has been Dallas' scoring 
machine since his rookie year when 
he averaged 18.7 points per game as 
he broke into Motta 's system, which 
keys around scoring by the smalt for- 
ward. 

There was talk Aguirre might be 
traded in the offseason but owner 
Don Carter interceded and has pro- 
ven to be a settling influence. 



Injury won't slow 
sprinter Reynolds 



By JEFF RAPP 
Sports Writer 



Jeff Reynolds, one of the bright 
spots in K-State's men's track 
squad during its first indoor meet 
this season, is down but not out. 

Reynolds, a transfer sprinter 
from Butler County Community 
College in El Dorado, won the 
500-meter dash Jan. 17 at the 
Nebraska Invitational in Lincoln. 

For Reynolds, originally from 
Akron, Ohio, it was quite a debut as 
a Wildcat because he defeated a 
defending Big Eight Conference 
champion in that race. 

Reynolds, however, sustained a 
groin injury in practice that will 
keep him out of action for at least 10 
days. The determined Reynolds 
said the injury, although very pain- 
ful, will inspire him to train even 
harder for the remainder of the 
season. 

"I want to be world class. I want 
to work hard to eventually be one of 
the top 10 in the world," Reynolds 
said. "Being injured is not helping 
me achieve that goal at all." 

Assistant coach Darryl Anderson 
said Reynolds has the right kind of 
personality to achieve such lofty 
goals. 

"He's a real determined and 
hard-working kind of guy, and be 
does just about everything you tell 
him to do. He's one of the most 
dependable guys on the team," 
Anderson said. 

It's not difficult to believe what 
Reynold's said about being world- 
class. After all, his brother Harry 
"Butch" Reynolds — a sprinter at 
Ohio State University — recently 
set a world record in the 600- meter 
dash. 

Reynolds said his brother's 
achievement is a great inspiration. 
"That's very exciting. That gives 
me the momentum, the drive, the 
enthusiasm to work that much 
harder. Because if he can do it, I 
know I can, too," Reynolds said. 

Anderson agreed, but also gave 
Reynolds credit for his own 
abilities. 

"One of the things that's affected 
his personality is striving to be as 
good as his brother and the other 
thing is his own strong desire to be 
successful," Anderson said. 
Anderson tried to convince both 



brothers to be Wildcat sprinters, 
but Harry opted to attend Ohio 
State. That left Jeff to make the 
transition from Butler County, 
(where both of them were 
tracksters), to K-State. 

"What made me come to Kansas 
State is Coach Anderson and Coach 
(John) Capriotti. You see, at the 
time K-State didn't have a head 
track coach. But once they hired 
head coach Capriotti, he started 
talking to me and that just boosted 
me even more to come here," 
Reynolds said. 

Reynolds' coach at Butler County 
was John Francis. Before moving 
to Pratt Community College this 
year, Francis had guided the 
Grizzlies to several appearances in 
the NJCAA indoor and outdoor 
championships in track. Reynolds 
said Francis had some input in his 
decision to become a Wildcat. 



'I want to work hard to 
eventually be one of the 
top 10 in the world/ 

— Jeff Reynolds 



"He told me that Kansas State 
would be a better school, as far as 
academics and track to succeed, 
than Ohio State would be," 
Reynolds said. 

Francis, in agreement with 
Anderson, said Reynolds was a joy 
to work with. 

"He's probably one of the best 
kids that I've coached talent -wise," 
Francis said. 

"He was a good person that work- 
ed hard and he was always one of 
the first guys to arrive at practice 
and one of the last guys to leave." 

Reynolds said he is glad he made 
the decision to stay in Kansas to fur- 
ther his education as well as his 
athletic career. 

"I like the campus, I like the 
classes and I like the atmosphere 
here. It's not all that noisy here and 
sort of laid back. That helps me get 
my books in order," he said. 

Reynolds said the typical 
"dangers" of college are still pre- 
sent in Manhattan, though. 

"You can slip and go down to Ag- 
gie v ill e and party and drink But 
I'm not going to slip." 




Stall Jim Dieu 

Despite a recent injury. Jeff Reynolds, a sprinter on the K-State track team, has been training with determination in 
an effort to reach his goal of being among the top 10 sprinters in the world. 



QB reflects on feeling 
that goes with losing 



By The Associated Press 

HONOLULU - John Elway has had a 
chance to reflect on that empty feeling 
that goes with being a Super Bowl loser. 

"It's like we were never even there," 
the Denver Broncos quarterback said. 

And "It's like the Giants are the only 
football team there is." 

Still, Elway also learned that even after 
the 39-20 loss to New York in Pasadena, 
Calif., last Sunday, the world went on 
spinning. 

"I was happy to see that the sun still 
came up Monday morning," Elway said 
with a smile. 

"I rehashed the game afterward, 
thought of the things I could 've done dif- 
ferently, but you do that with every game. 

"It was such a buildup for a game," 
said Elway, one of five Denver players in 
Hawaii for Sunday's Pro Bowl. 

"We would like to have won, of course, 
but you never know what to expect. 

"It was disappointing for us and for our 
fans back in Denver, but we still had a 
great season, and we'll have the chance to 
make it back to the Super Bowl again." 

"If we improve in some areas, we can 
play with anybody." he said. 

Elway, blossoming in his fourth pro 



season, actually played very well in the 
Super Bow). 

He wound up with 22 completions in 37 
attempts for 304 yards, with one intercep- 
tion. He threw for one touchdown and ran 
for another. 

But although he passed the Broncos 
down the field on four of their first five 
possessions, they came away with just 10 
points. 

In the second quarter, the Giant defense 
held Denver three times after the Broncos 
had first -and -goal at the New York 1, then 
Rich Karlis missed a 23-yard field goal. 

Later in the period, after Elway had 
been sacked in the Denver end zone for a 
safety, he came back to lead the Broncos 
to the New York 16, But, after the drive 
stalled, Karlis missed again and Denver 
led just 10-9 at halftime 

The New York defense then stiffened in 
the second half, and quarterback Phil 
Simms , passing almost flawlessly, led the 
Giants to 17 third-quarter points as they 
took command 

"It really hurt us when we couldn't get 
the ball into the end zone when we had it 
first -and-goal down there," Elway said 

Elway said he'd like to finish the season 
on a winning note, with an AFC victory 
over the NFC in Sunday's all-star game 



Tigers halt Huskers, 87-71 



By The Associated Press 

Derrick Chievous had 26 points as Missouri 
held off a late Nebraska rally to take an 87-71 
win in a Big Eight Conference game Wednes- 
day night. 

The Tigers led by as many as 10 in the first 
half, but a Nebraska rally tied the game at 30 
points. Missouri took a narrow 37-35 lead into 
the locker room. 

With Chievous scoring 10 of Missouri's first 
12 points in the second half, the Tigers took a 
six-point lead just after intermission 
Nebraska cut into that lead several times in 
the second half, closing the margin to four 
points with just over seven minutes to play. 
But Missouri went on a 8-0 run in the next two 
minutes to clinch the win. 

Poor free-throw shooting hurt Nebraska, 
as the Huskers hit only three of 17 shots from 
the line. 

Chievous was joined in double figures by 
Lynn Hardy with 21 points and Lee Coward 
with 14 points. 

Nebraska was led by Brian Carr with 16 
points. Anthony Bailous and Henry 
Buchanan each added 14 points. 

Missouri is now 14-7 overall and 4-1 in the 
Big Eight. Nebraska drops to 11-7 and 1-4 in 
the conference. 

Florida M, Alabama ho. OT 

Senior forward Joe Lawrence hit two 
3-point field goals to open the overtime 
period and No. 19 Florida pulled away to a 
90-BO victory over ninth-ranked Alabama 
Wednesday night. 

Florida grabbed a share of the 



College 

Basketball 

Roundup 



Southeastern Conference lead and ended the 
Crimson Tide's 12-game winning streak. 

Lawrence's two long jumpers in the first 
1:30 of overtime gave the Gators an 80-74 
lead. Florida, 16-4 overall and 8-1 in the con- 
ference, then made eight of 11 free throws to 
hold off Alabama. 15-3 and 8-1. 

Florida guard Andrew Moten finished with 
25 points to lead the Gators. 

Indiana 69, Illinois 66 

Dean Garrett scored the go-ahead basket 
with l 35 to play, then had a key blocked shot 
and made a free throw as No. 4 Indiana edg- 
ed No 12 Illinois 69-66 to take over first place 
in the Big Ten basketball standings Wednes- 
day night. 

Garrett, who finished with 20 points, made 
the first shot of a 1-and-l situation with 11 
seconds left to close the scoring. The lllini 
then had Doug AJtenberger and Ken Norman 
miss 3-point shots with Norman's despera- 
tion jumper bouncing off the rim as time ran 
out. 

The victory gave Indiana a 16-2 overall 
record and made it 7-1 in the conference. 



good for a one-half game lead over Iowa and 
Purdue. Illinois fell to 14-5 and 5-3. 

North Carolina 108, Clemson 99 
Kenny Smith scored a career-high 41 
points as No. 1 North Carolina rallied from a 
12-point halftime deficit to defeat No. 14 
Clemson 108-99 in an Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference basketball game Wednesday night. 
The Tar Heels outscored Clemson 22-5 over 
a six-minute span in the second half to erase 
a 78-73 lead and take a 95-83 lead with 2:49 
left. Smith, whose previous high was 23 
points, had eight points during the run as the 
senior guard scored 27 points in the final 20 
minutes. 

The Tar Heels, who improved to 18-1 
overall and 7-0 in the ACC, 2 x i games ahead 
of the Tigers and Duke. North Carolina has 
now defeated every ACC foe once this year. 
Clemson is 18-2 and 4-2. 
How the top 15 teams in The Associated 
Press' college basketball poll fared Wednes- 
day: 

1. North Carolina (18-1) beat No. 14 Clem- 
son 108-99. 2. Iowa (18-1) did not play 3. 
Nevada-Las Vegas (19-1) did not play. 4. In- 
diana (16-2) beat No. 12 Illinois 69-66. (tie) 
Purdue < 15-2) did not play. 

6. Syracuse (17-2) did not play. 7. Temple 
(19-2) did not play. 8 DePaul (17-1) did not 
play. 9, Alabama ( 15-3) lost to No. 19 Florida 
90-80, OT. 10. Oklahoma ( 15-3) did not play. 
II Georgetown (14-3) lost to Providence 
82-79. 12. Illinois (14-5) lost to No. 4 Indiana 
69-66. 13. Duke (15-3) did not play. 14. Clem 
son (18-2) lost to No. 1 North Carolina 106-99 
15 St John's (14-3) did not play 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thursday, January 29, 1987 



Students, senators discuss campus issues on SGA hotline 



By ERIC BARNHART 
Collegian Reporter 

Trie number of callers using a 
hotline established to increase com- 
munication between members of Stu- 
dent Senate and their constituents 
has been less than expected, said Sal- 
ly Traeger, senior in marketing and 
Senate chairwoman. 

"We have been averaging about a 
call an hour and around 10-15 calls a 
day," said Ken Paulie, junior in 



political science and hotline worker. 

"The main issues we have been 
hearing about are the (Student 
Senate Representation Enhance- 
ment) Referendum and the Athletic 
Pee Task Force," he said. "I think 
that once we get some advertising 
out and people know we have this, 
the number of calls will increase." 

"All that we're getting now is 
prank calls from friends because the 
line has not been advertised 
enough," said Sally Routson, coor- 



dinator of student activities. Routson 
said a request will be made to Senate 
tonight for hotline advertising 
money. 

Students with concerns or com- 
plaints about campus issues can talk 
to a student senator by calling 
532-7777. Senators are also available 
to take calls from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Students wishing to speak with a 
senator in person can also visit the 
Student Government Services Office 



on the ground floor of the Union, 
where a senator will be available 
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. 

The program is designed to get 
more students involved in govern- 
ment and to keep senators in touch 
with their constituency. 

"It's kind of like the U-LearN line 
— the students can call in and ask 
questions," said Candy Leonard, 
junior in home economics and mass 
communications and Student Senate 
Communications Committee 



chairperson. "But with this line, they 
can air their complaints or thoughts, 
whether they are aimed at student 
government or not." 

The hotline is funded through the 
office of the vice president of institu- 
tional advancement. 

The concept of a hotline came to 
mind last semester through the Com- 
munications Committee, but due to a 
lack of time the hotline did not go into 
action until this semester. 

"The idea stemmed from the 



thought that senators need to keep in 
touch with the people who elected 
them to this position." Traeger said. 

Senators participated in a mini 
training session provided by the 
Manhattan Crisis Center. Senators 
learned how to handle questions and 
any emergencies that may occur. 

A future project SGA has in mind 
for the hotline is having the student 
body president candidates answer 
phones during their campaigns to 
take questions from callers. 




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Group claims responsibility 
for abduction of 4 in Beirut 



assifieds 



KANSAS STATE COLUOIAN, Thwrtdgy, January *»■ 1 ** T L 1 



By The As sociated Press 

BEIRUT, Lebanon — A group catl- 
ing itself Islamic Jihad for the 
Liberation of Palestine claimed 
responsibility Wednesday for the ab- 
duction of three Americans and an 
Indian professor from a west Beirut 
campus. 

In London the Church of England 
said the Archbishop of Canterbury 
had received assurances that his en- 
voy, Terry Waite, was safe and conti- 
nuing his mission to free foreign cap- 
tives in Lebanon. 

"These assurances have been con- 
veyed to the Church of England from 
leaders of the Druse community who 
are Mr. Waite's hosts during his mis- 
sion to Lebanon. These leaders held 
conversations today with leaders of 
the Shiite community," a church 
statement said. 

The four professors were "con- 
spirators under the pretext of educa- 
tion," said the handwritten Arabic- 
language statement delivered to the 
west Beirut office of a Western news 
agency. The group had not been 
heard from before. 

The statement was accompanied 
by a Polaroid picture of one of the 
hostages, American professor 
Robert Polhill, 53, of New York City, 
a lecturer in accounting. 



PoIhUl and three others were seiz- 
ed Saturday at the campus of Beirut 
University College by gunmen pos- 
ing as Lebanese riot police. 

The other hostages are Alarm 
Steen, 47, of Areata, Calif., a com- 
munications instructor; Jesse 
Turner, 39, of Boise, Idaho, a visiting 
professor of mathematics and com- 
puter science; and Mithileshwar 
Singh, 60, a visiting professor of 
finance. 

Singh is a native of India and resi- 
dent alien of the United States. 

The group said in its statement: 
"The Islamic Jihad Organization for 
the Liberation of Palestine, as it an- 
nounces its debut, declares respon- 
sibility for the abduction of four 
Americans who are conspirators 
under the pretext of education. 

"They have been using the facade 
of teaching to carry out American in- 
trigues at Beirut University 
College," the statement said. 

The Beirut newspaper An-Nahar 
said it received the same claim of 
responsibility along with a Polaroid 
picture of Singh. 

It could not be determined whether 
the group is related to Islamic Jihad, 
or Islamic Holy War, the pro-Iranian 
Shiite Moslem extremist faction that 
holds American and French hostages 
kidnapped in west Beirut in 1965 



and Stmrs 



The fate of Waite had been uncer- 
tain following unconfirmed reports 
by the official Kuwaiti news agency 
that he was placed under house ar- 
rest by Shiite Moslems who have 
held two Americans hostage since 
1965. Waite vanished Jan. 20 after 
leaving his hotel to negotiate with the 
captors. 

In other developments: 

— U.S. Embassy chief of security 
Jim McWhairter said Lebanese 
police escorted an American, whose 
name he would not reveal, out of 
west Beirut so he could leave 
Lebanon from the Christian port of 
Jounieh. 

Fewer than half a dozen American 
men remain in west Beirut. An 
estimated 50 American women are 
there, most of them married to 
Lebanese Moslems. 

In Washington, the State Depart- 
ment announced restrictions on 
travel to Lebanon in an effort to force 
U.S. citizens to leave and discourage 
other Americans from coming here. 

He said he also supportetd "acts of 
kidnapping carried out to exert 
pressure aimed at defending the 
causes of Islam, including the abduc- 
tion of the two ( West) Germans to ob- 
tain the release of a Moslem arrested 
in Germany, which wants to hand 
him over to America." 



by Doug & Dick 



CLASSIFIED RATES 
Ona day: 1 S words or tower, $2.25, 15 
cants per word over 1 5; Two consecu- 
tive days: 15 words or fewer, $3.25, 20 
cants per word over 15; Three consecu- 
tive day*: 15 words or fewer, $4.00, 25 
cents per word over 15; Four consecu- 
tive days: 15 words or fewer, $4.50, 30 
cents per word over 15; Five consecu- 
tive days: 1 5 words or fewer, $4.75, 35 
cents per word over 15. 

Classilieds ara payable In advance unless cli- 
ent has an established account with Student Publi- 
cations. 

Deadline is noon the day be lore publication 
noon FRIDAY FOR Monday's paper 

Display Cie.titled Rate* 

Ona day ** 95 pa' inch, Three consecutive 
days: S4 75 per Inch; Five consecutive days 14 50 par 
inch, Ten consecutive days: S4 25 par inch (Deadline 
ts 4:30 p.m. two days before publication.) 

C I as si f led adva rt i s i n g i s avail able on I y to t ho»e 
who do not discriminate Oh the basis Of race, color, 
religion, national origin, sei or ancestry 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



01 




MARY KAY Cosmetics- Skin cam— glamour prod 
uct s Free facial calt Fiorls Taylor. 53*2070 Handi 
capped accessible (7B-1 1&) 

ASK ME about Mary Kay! Janet Milllken, 539-9*89 
(69-88) 

K-STATE GREEK Newspaper Statl will meet Thurs- 
day, January 30th at 4 p m In Stateroom »2 Every 
one plan to attend (87) 

SPRING BREAK Hurry < Limited space available at 
these number one collegiate beach and ski desti- 
nations. South Padre Island. Daylona Beach, 
Steamboat Springs. Miami Beach/Fort Lauder 
dale. Mustang Island/Port Aransas. Galveston Is 
land and Fort Walton Beach Can Sunchese Tours 
Central Spring Break Toll Free Hot Line today lor 
information and reservations— 1800-321 -591 1 1 
179-981 

THE COMPETITION has arrived' Now available on 
campus— Avon Beauty Products. Contact Kara, 
532-3291 (8347) 

TO GIVE AWAY: 
FREE MONEY 

The $1,017 

Cold Cash Giveaway 

Listen i<> KMKF I0I.7 FM 

lor details 



KH/KF 




Bloom County 



PEOPLE'S GROCERY Co-op. 811 Colorado. IS open 
to everyone Wednesday and Friday. 9am- 1 p.m. 
and Saturday. 9 a-m -5 p.m 539-481 1 (8347) 

PLANNING A spring wedding? Quality photographs 
at affordable prices, done the way you want Call 
Brad lor mora information 776-3785 (86-87) 

H E LP C H IL DRE N learn The F riendsh i p Tu ton ng Pro 
gram need) more lutotsl Please call 776-6566 It 
you are willing to volunleer to help a Child on 
Thursday evenings 186-90) 

ONE CHOIR scholarship available tor tenor voice 
Call First Lutheran, 537-8532 (88-88) 



By Berke Breathed ATTENTION 



02 



/-« I.UH. 

/if > M5H 10 PtM- 

CMtfFW OFFICIAL 
ARHOLP 

scimPiimtMK 







30 W CMST 

m miCK en pup£ * 




i mum 'if we might 
earner ws im/SficnoN 
wtnmr auRTiNb ham 
m civ/uter worn,? 

IN m fflK£55 

\ 




sub Hev. 

WHY 7M CM5T 
MiVPAlP, 

pwe? ■ 



m 

SHH\ 





By Jim Davis 



1 CAT TOO MUCH 0ECAUSE I'M 
pePR£66EP,ANP TM PEPRES5EP 
0ECAO5E I EAT TOO flrtOCH 





Peanuts 



By Charles Schulz 



CHOCOLATE, VANILLA, strawberry Need 100 over 
weight people to try new improved herbal weight 
control program with new flavors No drugs, noe* 
ercite, 100*. guaranteed Call 776-5114 or 778 
1485 (78-981 

HERBALIFE INDEPENDENT distributor See us lor 
products Cat) 778-51 14 or 778 1*65 (76 98) 

SKYDIVE 

Info Meeting 

Tonight 7 p.m. 

Union 206 

Club meeting 

at 7:30 p. in. 

Members who want to 

jump this semester 

MUST ATTEND 

AND PAY DUES. 

Party this Friday 

Attend meeting for location 

ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, and Ireland lor under 
it.300. Travel lo Europe lor 11 days; includes air 
tare, meals, sightseeing and lodging Leaving Kan 
sas City May 18 Call right away for more informa- 
tion 539-2883. 185-891 

GOTERN M E NT SUftPUJ S ! ' Ove rcoat s . t lei d I ac kete, 
camouflage clothing, wool gloves and socks, cold 
weather boots. Carhartt work wear, much more 1 ' 
Just 28 miles east on highway 24 Open Monday 
-Saturday. 9-5 St Marys Surplus Sales. 1-437- 
2734 (86-961 




I TRY TO TALK TO THIS 
6.RL, SEE, BUT ALL SHE 
EVER 5AV5 IS/AR6NT YOD 

KINP0FOLP FOR ME?" 




IUJA5pORNINOCT06ER.,. 
SHEUIASBOKHINDECEMBEK. 
I'M ONLY TWO MONTHS 
tXPER THAN SHE! 




OBVIOUSLY, THE 
61 RL THINKS SHE'S 
STILL APUPFY! 




FOR RENT-MISC 



03 



RENTAL TYPEWRITERS-Correctlng and non- 
correcting Typewriter nbbons for sale, service 
available Hull Business Machines, 7t5 North 
12th. Aggievllle. 539-1413 <27tf| 

Edelaines Weddings Plus 
TUX SPECIAL $39.99 

on tuxes ordered by 2-28-87 
for any occasion-anytime 
421 POYNTZ 



776-4498 



C rosswqrd 



ACROSS 39 S»< « or DOWN 19 City train 

1 Did stable 40 Director 1 Daltle 21 Naval 

Wl) rk Howard memento affinn- 

5 Howler or 42 Overrun 2 Hearty ative 

bonnet 46 Light 3 Likr a 24 Lid 

H Hair do benders DC. 25 Ej«s 

12(>rotto 49 "la" uiuloer office 26 Air mail 

13 "Long — 50 Doc's org 4 Refuses mstrip 
and Far 52 Sticky 5 Like an lion 
Away" s,llfl optimist's 28 New, in 

14 Droplet 53 Crucifix glass? Nuremberg 

15 TV's 54 Haider 6 Longevity 29 Pores! 
Thicke dash 7 Imple- tract 

ment 30 Certain 

8 Repenting colonist 
one 31 Bread 

9 Crystal tyi»e 
line rock 36 Bits of 

10 Fury food 

58 Hymn end 1 1 Mouthward 37 Affix 

2« mm* 38 M y s,ef y 

<• Choice 

US! 



hoar 

56 Motel's 
fore 
runners 

57 Ultimate 



Solution time: 

I5TT 



16 Stellar cat 55 Hull or 

1 7 < iymnast 
Korhtil 

18 Kind of 
map or 
pitcher 

20 Came 

down 
22 Santa's 

helper 
23 1 IK 

24 Hi lilt h t-' 

foes 
27(riiir goal 

32 Actress 
( iardner 

33 (j rant's tot 

34 Some 
amount 

35 St i irk 
share price 

38 Noted 
art dei o 
artisi 




',C|E 

AL TED, 
luERfli 

(Ml M l|E.0,N 
I GJO^lE R E 

itotRtf CsTO 

iAN 



Yesterday's answer 



word 

42 Cross 
in si -rip 
tion 

43 Light gas 

44 Merit 

46 Bridge 
coup 

47 Canyon 
animal 

48 "Now I've 
— every 
thing!" 

1 29 61 Wit 

tntsin 




CRYPTOQCIP 



1 29 



V K N V 



B I II 



i y u x v f 



X Y S K O Y V C 



I K II 



It 



Yesterday's 



R P C B I) 

Cryptoqulp: THIS 



s y i» v v 

u h u 
SKILLR'L 



N . " 
111 'LA 



DANCRR C< H 'LDNT SHAKE OFF HER COLD. 
Today's Crypl<H|Uip clue B equals O 



FOR RENT. I wobedroom mobile home, 1200 month 
plus deposit. M 7- 7622 (65-93) 



FOR RENT-APTS 



04 



FOR RENT- HOUSES 



05 



TWO BEDROOM luiury dupiei, fireplace, garage, 
west of KSU Available now 1429. Call 538-4294 
|78tl| 

SHARE THREE bed room house close to campus. 
1113 plus low utilities 776 2440 (86 881 



FOR SALE-AUTO 



06 



t986 FORD F'50 4x4, 351 VB 4B, supercao Low 
mileage Best oiler 539 7409 (8191) 

1976 GRAND Prix excellent condition, power 
brakes, steering, locks, windows sun roof. 537- 
9282 alter 6pm (88901 

TOYOTA PICKUP. 1964. clean, eiceltenl condition 
five speed, long bed. topper 776-0529 (87 93) 

1987 MUSTANG -very good condition— make oiler 
Call Jim 537 4211 (87 88) 

FOR SALE. 1978 Fdrd Maverick V* automatic, air, 
reclining seats. 50.000 miles i 485-2266 (67-88) 

1981 DODGE Omni for sate Four-door yellow Call 
532 3818 (87491 

GA NtOU buy Jeeps cars 4 k 4s sailed in drug raids 
lor under 1100'' Call 'or facts today 602*37 3401 
Eit S 7*4 (87) 



FOR SALE-MISC 



07 



EX 60 SILVER Reed typewriter Sesl Offer 539-7409 
(61-91) 

KELSEV 12-cnannel miner S470, Make bass guitar. 
HBO Kuslom powr amp. 1200: prices negotiable. 
776-1925 (83-871 

Edelaines Weddings Plus 

Wedding Dresses 
20-50% off 

421 POYNTZ 77f>4498 

ELEVEN-PIECE drum sat lor sale Slingertand flew, 
nine loms. one kick, snare and hi hat Five cymbal 
stands Includes case* tor everything Also one 
AKG D12E bass drum microphone, ona Sure 
SM58. and one Sure PE 751. 778-2448— Darren. (88- 
90) 

JVC CAR stereo digital, auto reverse, fader 1120. or 
bast offer Call Bob, 776-0234. (86-88) 

''HalVC* ll<>USC of* :Mu*.C 

DOD Effects 
30% Off 

.*27 Poyni/ 776-798.1 

WOMEN S 10 speed bicycle, 180 Jens Pedersen. 
Cardwen 301. Call 532-8782. or F31 Ja/din* Ter 

race 166 87) 

CORONA PC. dual disks, 128K. IBM compatible. SC 
3, multimate. Priced to sell 537-7226 (88-90) 

COMMODORE 1541 disk drivt, used about *l( 
months Excellent condition Otler Contact Leon. 
532 4886 (8848) 

RCA 13 inch, black/white T.V. 537-9829. 186 88) 




SUN 
CONNECTION 

5 sessions 
for $ 15 

LARGEST TANNING SALON 
IN MANHATTAN 

1126 Laramie 776-2426 

CENTREX STEREO complete with speaker*, turnta- 
ble. AM/FM. cassette player 537-9829 (88-88) 

SHOTGUN— FOX 12-geuga. double-barrel, side-by- 
side Excellent condition Case Included 12*0 
Call 539-1371 196-88) 

BASKETBALL-SEASON ticket, best offer Call 537 
0663 (87 88) 

FOR SALE -MOTORCYCLES 01 

YAMAHA 22S. ihree-wheel ATV Electric alert aheft. 
full suspension, good condition MOO Call 539- 
3807 187-90) 



FOUND 



10 



TWO BEDROOM luaury dupiei Fireplace, garage, 
west of campus, 8450 Call 539-4294 or 776-2536, 
(6911) 

FREE RENT In January. Large two-bedroom, nicely 
decorated, dishwasher, disposal. No pats 8300. 
deposit required 539-1485 (85-88) 

ONE BEDROOM. I wo bedroom apartments, fur- 
nished or unfurnished, (new furniture) Westtoop 
area. Call 776-9124.17811) 

ONE BEDROOM apartment. t205/rnontn Gas, heat. 
and water included Lease and deposit required 
Call 537 7794 evening* or weekends (7668) 

TWO- BEDROOM luxury dupiei. fireplace, garage, 
west of KSU Available now. 8425 Call 539-4294 
(7811) 

MONT BLUE 
APARTMENTS 

Leasing for June 
•Studio, 1 & 2 Bedroom 
Apartments 
and Townhouses 
•Close to campus 
539-4447 

LARGE TWO- bed room, partially lumlshed basement 
apartment close lo campus, 1411 Vista Lane. Own 
entrance, no pets, parking lor two cars Dapoin 
plus rent, available n?w Pay own electricity. Phone 
235-3550. Topeka (79-881 

LARGE.WARM,two-bed room apartment , five block * 
from campus. No pets (300 Call 776-0181 (7911) 

ADJACENT TO campus. 1224 Bertrand. Nice, two- 
bedroom with garage, wasner and dryer Wa pay 
water, traih Asking 8350 Call 537 1745 or 53? 
4422 182-90) 

ONE BEDROOM, furnished apartment, bill* paid. 
537 731 3 or 539-8401 One-halt block from campus 
(63-87) 

TWO BEDROOM apartment, partially furnished, 
Close lo campus with air conditioning Rent 125$ 
Call 539-7253 (6346) 

1 Bedroom 

close to campus 

new furniture 

new paint 

$ 270 

call 539-1642 

or 

537-4567 



NEAR KSU. quiet, clean, one-bedroom, furnished, 
laundry, air conditioning, parking. Available June 
1 Call 776-7814 or 538-3803. (85-104) 

NICE TWO-bsdroom apartment, lumlshed. laundry 
lac 1 1 ill as Near campu* Free February rent, 778- 
8707 (after 8 p ml (86 88) 

ROOMMATES WAN TEO— Share nice apartment 
aero** from Ford Hall 1125/month and lew ulili 
tits 1230 Clallln. apartment three Call 537-0657. 
(87-89) 



FOUND-SET of key* on a Bon Zllla key chain Call 
to identify or claim. 537-4113 Ask tor Deanne (88 
68) 



HELP WANTED 



13 



EARN 8480 weekly— 160 per hundred envelopes 
stulled Guaranteed Homeworker* needed for 
company project stuffing envelopes and assam 
blmg material*. Sand stamped, self- addressed en 
velope to JBK Mailcompany, PO Bon 25-52. Cas 
tale, California 91310 {76-109) 

AIRLINES, CRUISELINES hiring! Summer. Careen 
Good pay Travel Call lor guide, cassette, newsser- 
vice' (916)944-4444 Eit #58 (76-135) 

THE KANSAS Cooperative E< tension Service has an 
Opening for student computer programmers The 
position is for 20 hours per week, flexible sched- 
ule. Applicants should be familiar with ona ol the 
following languages Paacal. C. oi PUl Summer 
employment l* a possibility depending on per- 
torment e For more Informal ion contact Or. Steve 
Welch or Mary Knapp al 21 1 Umberger. phone 532- 
7019 Application blanks are available from the 
above Individuate or in the Computer Science Of- 
fice and will be taken during buainess hours 
through February 6. 1987. (83-92) 

NEED EXTRA cult? Earn 1100's weakly at home 
Free details I Rush sell addressed stamped enve- 
lope Sterling Enterprises. Bon 151 4-C, Manhattan. 
KS 66502 (83-87) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT al Camp Lines In/Camp 
Lake Hubert — Minneaola resident summer 
cam ps Aslrongcommlt ment laworkingwilhchif- 
flren required, along with activity skills and teach- 
ing en perle nc e Spec I lie |ob i n formation and appl i - 
cations are available al Career Placement 
Ol lice— Hoi ti Hall Sign up, in advance, tor per 
Sonal interview* to be held on campus, Tuesday. 
February 3rd, and Wednesday. February 4th, 1967 
(84 90) 

WAITRESSES, MUST be 21. al Bonkers, 1216 Lara- 
mie. 537-9591 186 90) 



STUDENTS WANTED to help with facilities r 
nance of Throckmorton Greenhouses 4-12 hours 
each per week Apply in person and be prepared to 
lake a competency lasi (30-45 mmutesl Test score 
will determine who is railed for an interview Work 
schedule It four nour time blocks only {all morn- 
ing or all afternoon only) A lew hour* every fifth 
weekend is required Apply in person al D 107 (old 
dairy bam north of Throckmorton Hall) See Tammy 
or Tom. {86-87) 

TYPIST NEEDED. 50-55 word* per minute, know! 
edge of WordStar preferred 10- IS hours per week. 
13 35-83 75 per hour Work study preferred Call 
Dora al 532-6842 (87 901 



LOST 



14 



LOST: GOLD chain necklace with angel charm II 
round, please can Debi al 537 1570 184-881 

ORANGE BACKPACK containing assorted tent- 
books. Lost January 27 on road between KSU Un 
ion and Aggievills II found, please call Jeff at 776 
0203. (86 90) 

CAMOUFLAGE WALLET. Wednesday in Union TV 
room Important IDs Reward ottered Call Brill. 
7843180 (8748) 



NOTICES 



IS 



NEED MONEY lor college'' Let us match you with 
scholarship and grant money lor which you Cen 
qualify For more Information write Student Finan- 
cial Aid Service*. 1613 S W. Chelsea Drive. Topeka, 
KS 66604 (82 91) 

ATTENTION SCALPERS Need (Our KU- KSU basket- 
ball ticket* lor February 4 Company coming 537 
7087 (83-67) 

VW REPAIRS done right the first time J 6 LAulo Ser 
vice. 1-4942366. Drive a little and save money (66 
95) 



PERSONAL 



16 



TO CUTE blonde Anytime this weekend You name 
the lime and place Darkhairad guy in grey RX7 
187) 

KfSSIFUR rCKJ-Wt 22 and I lota you!! Happy Birth- 
day. Shelly (87) 

SPENCER- HEY of timer' Happy 22nd Birthday I 
hope Ihis day and all the rest to come are special' I 
Love Ye' Linda (87) 

PARACHUTE CLUB Super Dave *ays "We ar» due for 

a parly" Thi* Friday -come 10 the meeting tor lo- 
cation 1671 
JACKIE— CONGRATS on your *coop~ lm really 
proud, but not surprised I always had faith in you 
and alway* will I L.Y. —Johnny impossible (87) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 



17 



MALE ROOMMATE needed — Acroi* street 'rom 
campus 1135/month plus utilities 7789369 (76 
88) 

MALE ROOMMATEISI wanted lo share a in bedroom 
house Total eipense about 8160 per month No 
deposit, aval I able now 776-9222 163-87) 

ROOMMATE TO share a Iwo bedroom partially fur 
nisned apartmeni Close to campus with a>r condi 
Honing, rent and utilities SI 50 Call 539-7253. (83 
881 

MALE ROOMMATE wanted to share new apartment 
Own room. S1SS per month plus ulihiles 537 4347 
(63-87) 

MALE ROOMMATE across street trom campu* at 
1230 Valtier Ground floor private room, washer- 
dryer fireplace f135rmonth. plus utilities 776 
9369. (84-931 

FEMALE TO that* two bedroom apartmeni Loll of 
room' S130)month- split utilities Call 776-5265 
alter 6:30 p m (85-881 

MALE ROOMMATE wanted; 1133 plus utilities own 

room, quiet, nice home 776-1988 Ask for Lee 185 

86) 
ROOMMATE— RENT negotiable, own room laundry 

facilities, neil to campu* Can 776 3833 k*ep try 

Ing (86-90) 

NONSMOKING FEMALE -large house. Sundeck 
w**h*r/dry*r Utilities paid own room SI 751 
month. 5396628 (86-95) 

RESPONSIBLE MALE to share two-bedroom house 
in Keats (8 miles west of Umon| St 00 deposit . 1100 
rent, one-hall uliiilie* S39-8541 attar 7pm (87 9ti 



SERVICES 



18 



PREGNANT -1 birthright can help Free preg- 
nancy led Conlident.ai Call 537-9180 103 S 
Fourth St Suite 25 (HI) 

PHOMPT ABORTION and contraceptive service* in 
Lawrence 913-841 5716 (39tt| 

EXPERIENCED TYPIST-SI 10/page Disc *lor*ge, 
letter quality, reports, thens. etc 532-5961 or 537 
9205. Don n da (7668) 

TYPING1WORD processing Data sheets, resumes 
letter*, term paper*, dissert a lions etc Mr* Bur 
den. 539-1204 (60-691 

Courtesy Demonstration 

by Appointment 
9: 30-5;. K) Monday -Saturday 

1W fWr fcr *- UW *»•' 

308 Pnymz 7764533 

QUALITY TYPING for Si per page Contact John. 539- 
5839 181-90) 

OUALITV TYPING al economical price* Oi»*ena 
tion*. Resume*. Theses , etc. Cell Ceron al 532 
8294 or 776-2279 (66 951 

MARTIE-S TYPING Service Won) Processor. 1011 
Juliette, 537-3314. Term papers, the***, disserta- 
tion* 8am lo5pm. (87-80) 



SUBLEASE 



20 



SUMMER SUBLEASE -three-bedroom, one and 
one-half bath, close to campu*. S466 Call 776- 
5379 (8640) 

WANTED 21 

WANTED: A lew good KSU men to sham a unique *x 
penence The ra-organtiallon ol Alpha Kappa 
Lambda. Room 207, K Stale Union. 7 p,m . Febru 
ary 3. 167911 



WANTED TO BUY 



22 



WANTED JUDO gi ault. Call 532-4802 aak tor Ri 
chard (84-88) 

HELP" NEED one KU -K State ticket Call Mike al 
539-0906 (86-90) 



■ ■ ■ m *^*+^**m*mm*m*j&l 






> 



12 



KAHKH STATE COLLEGIAN, Thursday. January 2», 1M7 



Penalty 



Continued from Page I 



role in the proposal's defeat. 

"It forced a lot of people to look at 
the issue a lot closer," said Knopp, 
R-Manhattan, who added he believed 
some of the missing legislators 
would have voted against the 
measure. 

A leading opponent of the death 
penalty, Rep. John Solbach. 
D-Lawrence, said he was pleased 
with the outcome, which he claimed 
might lead to a greater public 
understanding of the proposal. 

"I think this is a great victory for 
the people of the state of Kansas," 
Solbach said. "I think this sends a 
message out that this is a very com- 
plex and costly issue." 

Braden blamed the outcome on an 
alleged plan by Democrats to vote en 
masse against the bill in order to 
gain leverage to restore some of the 
$11.7 million in welfare cuts the 
Legislature passed during the first 
week of the session. 

"The votes are there," said 
Braden, R-Clay Center. "Apparently 
some people are playing games with 



the death penalty." 

Another key reason for the defeat, 
Braden said, was that the vote 
wasn't recorded. He claimed 
Democrats were instructed at their 
caucus meeting Wednesday morning 
to vote against the bill, while he told 
GOP lawmakers to vote according to 
their consciences. 

House Minority Leader Marvin 
Barkis, D-Louisburg, denied he had 
given marching orders to the 
Democrats at the caucus but he said 
there was some sentiment among 
legislators from his party to use the 
death penalty vote as a negotiating 
tool for restoration of the welfare 

cuts. 

Rejection of the bill was especially 
surprising after lawmakers voted 
68-50 during debate to turn down an 
amendment that would have remov- 
ed all references to the death penalty 
from the bill and would have inserted 
a requirement that convicted 
murderers serve 30-year minimum 
prison sentences. 

At least three dozen legislators 
spoke during the marathon debate — 
and of nine proposed amendments to 
the bill, four were adopted. 

A change narrowing the scope of 
the bill to cover only premeditated 
murder was adopted 63-54. That 



amendment, offered by Rep. Dale 
Sprague, R-McPherson. deleted 
language that would cover murders 
committed without forethought dur- 
ing the commission of most felonies. 

Under that language, the only in- 
stances in which prosecutors would 
not have to prove premeditation in 
order to gain a capital murder con- 
viction would be in connection with 
killings committed during kidnapp- 
ings, rapes or sodomies. 

A second change, which was ap- 
proved 57-56, would require an en- 
tirely new jury be empaneled for the 
sentencing stage of a capital murder 
trial. As introduced, the bill called 
for jurors to first determine the guilt 
or innocence of a defendant and then, 
during a second proceeding, decide 
whether a guilty defendant should 
receive the death penalty or life im- 
prisonment. 

Rep. Bill Roy Jr., D-Topeka, who 
successfully promoted the amend- 
ment, said the effect would be to 
allow death penalty opponents to 
serve on juries that hear the first 
stage of a capital murder trial. 

Roy said he was sure the provision 
would increase the costs of capital 
murder trials. An estimate released 
Wednesday from the Legislative 
Research Department showed even 



without the new language requiring 
the second jury, capital murder 
trials would consume an extra $10 
million in state and local tax money 
each year. 

The bill provides that sentencing 
juries must find one of seven "ag- 
gravating circumstances" exist and 
that they are not outweighed by 
mitigating factors before recommen- 
ding a death sentence. The recom- 
mendation could be overturned by 
the trial judge and the conviction 
would be automatically reviewed by 
the Kansas Supreme Court. 

Other changes in the bill the House 
approved Wednesday included 
language that would permit those ac- 
cused in capita) murder cases to 
select the Kansas attorney of their 
choice to defend them — at state ex- 
pense — as well as to donate their 
organs after they are convicted and 
the sentence is carried out. 

Kansas had capital punishment by 
hanging until a 1973 U.S. Supreme 
Court decision struck it down along 
with the death penalty statutes of all 
other states. 

The high court reinstated capital 
punishment with a 1976 decision. The 
Legislature has passed four capital 
punishment measures since 1978 only 
to see them vetoed by Carlin. 



Sisca 



Continued from Page 1 



flee, people will take more respon- 
sibility for what the government is 
doing around the world and in our 
country," he said. 

Picket signs were numerous, in- 
cluding two that stated "Student Aid, 
not Contra Aid" and "War is the Real 
Enemy." 

Merchant 



"We're here to show our opposition 
to what Ronald Reagan describes as 
the State of the Union. His perspec- 
tive on it is full of lies," said Steve 
Milligan, graduate student in 
chemical engineering and vice presi- 
dent of SISCA 

As the demonstration wound down, 
two students walked out of the Union 
— one wearing a Reagan mask, the 
other waving a "Ronbo" poster. 

Striding across the courtyard, the 
Reagan supporters yelled, "Go, Ron- 
ny, go!" 



Continued from Page 1 



and enjoy and we trust that they will 
show their responsibility as adults 
when they come down and enjoy 
themselves in Aggieville. 

"I think (the students') main in- 
volvement is to act responsibly and 
show leadership," he said. "Ag- 
gieville has been adopted by the 
students for years. We cater to the 
students' needs. Whenever there's a 
fund-raiser, the Aggieville mer- 
chants are the first ones they ask, 
and we try to support them as much 
as we can. 



Enjoy smooth, creamy 

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OPEN: 11 a.m. -11 p.m. Doily 
Noon- II p.m. Sunday* 

Nautilus Tower j- Aggie ville 



Manila 



Continued from Page I 



(Armed Forces of the Philippines > 
intact." 

Honasan was formerly security 
chief to ex-Defense Minister Juan 
Ponce Enrile and played a key role in 
the February military revolt against 
Marcos which propelled Aquino to 
power. 

Honasan was allegedly linked to 
the aborted coup against Aquino last 
November which led to Enrile's 
dismissal. 

Up to 1,000 heavily armed soldiers, 
marines and riot police took posi- 
tions around the walled broadcast 
center in suburban Manila. It was 
the last position held by rebels who 
had attempted a pre-dawn coup 
Tuesday, the most serious challenge 
by right-wing military men since 
Aquino came to power 11 months 



ago. 

Heavily armed troops wearing gas 
masks moved toward the station in a 
five-truck convoy. Marines in 
civilian clothes and wearing yellow 
armbands — the color of Aquino's 
"people power revolution" against 
Marcos — were on standby to move 
in. 

The deadline passed, and five tear- 
gas grenades were fired near the sta- 
tion wall as warnings. There were no 
reports of fire by the mutineers. 

During a lull in the tear gas 
volleys, an unidentified woman in- 
side the broadcast center issued a de- 
fiant warning over DZBB that the 
mutineers would not give up. The 
woman was among about 50 pro- 
Marcos civilians who joined the 
estimated 190 mutinous military 
men. 

"Why are you doing this to us, Mrs. 
Aquino?" she asked in an emotion- 
choked voice. "We are not moving 
out of here. It will be sweeter for us if 



SKYDIVE 

. Info Meeting Tonight 7 p.m. 
Union 206 
Club Meeting at 7:30 p.m. 

MEMBERS WHO WANT TO 
JUMP THIS SEMESTER 

MUST ATTEND AND PAY DUES. 

Party this Friday— attend meeting for location 






"THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED' 1 

Study/Discussion Group 

9:45 a.m., Sundays 

DANF0RTH CHAPEL 

This is a six-week discussion group focusing on Scott 
Peck's popular book with emphasis on the sections of 
Love and Grace. In view of our own experiences we will 
explore the myth of romantic love, dependency, love as 
risk, discipline, separateness and mystery. We will also 
concern ourselves with the nature, the mystery and 
power of frace, biblically and in personal growth. 

EVERYONE WELCOME! 

Sponsored by Lutheran Campus Ministry 

1021 Denison, Don Fallon, campus pastor, 539-4451 

Kansas State University 

and 

Univ. of Calif.— Santa Barbara 

present 

S Actors From The 
London Ska 9 a 

Thurs., Jan. 29 

Pinter This Evening 

Readings from Harold 
Pinter's Plays 

Nichols Theatre 

8 p.m.— $5/$3 

Fri. & Sat., Jan. 30 & 31 

The Tempest 

by William Shakespeare 

McCain Auditorium 

8 p.m.-.$8/$4 

Kansas 

Committee for the 
Humanities 



For Tlckttt Call 

532 6398 

Men. -Fri. 12-5 B.m 




A*l»t44l« el lh« Millonil fcnd.wm«ftl <or Ihc HvmanHfrfc 



you kill us with bullets rather than 
tear gas." 

Ramos had ordered the rebels to 
surrender during a 45-minute 
meeting outside the station with 
Canlas before dawn Wednesday. 

Canlas told reporters Wednesday 
afternoon he was ready to surrender 
but wanted time to arrange details. 
Authorities feared he was stalling in 
hopes that pro-Marcos rein- 
forcements would come to his aid. 

Canlas denied any links to Marcos 
and claimed the takeover was aimed 
at dramatizing the Communist 
threat and titer military grievances. 
Some military officers have criticiz- 
ed Aquino's peace overtures toward 
Communist rebels. The government 
has negotiated a cease-fire with the 
Marxists and has held peace talks to 
end the 18-year-old insurgency. 

At his home in exile in Honolulu on 
Tuesday night, Marcos answered, 
"No, no, no, no," when asked if he 
directed the rebellion. 



Fee 



Continued from Page 1 

were going to have to raise the fee 
when we talked at the meeting. I 
thought everybody understood that." 

Folk said he did not see what the 
problem was because the members 
who were complaining were not 
sponsors of the bill. 

In addition to Folk and Leeds, 
sponsors of the bill attending the task 
force meeting were Roger 
Haymaker, junior in business ad- 
ministration; Steve Ligon, senior in 
animal sciences and industry; and 
Sandy Marihugh, sophomore in 
business administration. 

Svaty, the sixth sponsor, did not at- 
tend the meeting. 

Kelly Lamborn, senior in jour- 
nalism and mass communications 
and task force member, said the task 
force meeting was over when the fee 



was raised to $6.50. 

"As far as I know, Doug (Folk) 
raised the fee," Lamborn said. 

Bill Majerus, graduate student in 
agronomy and task force member, 
said he found out about the 16.50 fee 
Wednesday. The fee was still $6 25 
when the meeting was adjourned, he 
said. 

A $6 fee for full-time students and a 
$3 fee for part-time students would 
have been about $4,000 short of the 
estimated $193,000 needed to fund 40 
percent of the non-revenue athletic 
sports scholarships. 

Based on fall 1966 enrollment 
figures, the extra 50 cents a semester 
would generate about $9,700 more 
than the estimated amount needed. 

"The people who made the deci- 
sion to raise the fee another 50 cents 
are screwing up the whole issue," 
Caraway said. "We were closer to 
the 40 percent figure when we were 
$4,000 short than we are at $10,000 
over," 




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Inside 






Stage Presence 

Five actors have been on 
campus sharing their ex- 
pertise and knowledge of 
Shakespearean theater. See 
Entertainment Plus. 



Weather 



Sports 




Mostly Sunny 

Mostly sunny today, 
high in the low to 
mid-50s. Winds 
variable 5 to 10 mph. 
Increasing cloudiness 
tonight. 




- 

■ ■ 









Derrick Chievous will lead 
the University of Missouri 
Tigers against the Wildcats 
in a Sunday conference 
matchup in Columbia, Mo. 
See Page 7. 



Kansas 
State 




Friday 

January 30. ISft? 



Kansas State University 



Manhattan. Kansas 66506 



Volume 93, Number US 



Student Senate approves athletic fee measure 



Senators debate nearly four hours on issue 



By JUDY LUNDSTROM 
Collegian Reporter 



The Non-Revenue Sports Scholar- 
ship Fee Bill is on its way to a student 
referendum. 

A special orders vote during first 
readings of the bill in Student Senate 
just after midnight Thursday made it 
possible to skip second readings next 
Thursday and send the bill directly to 
a referendum vote during Senate 
elections Feb. 10-U. 

Nearly four hours of discussion 
and debate preceded the vote, with 
the greatest amount of dissension 
coming from senators representing 
the graduate school. 

"You have the right to reject this 
proposed bill, and I strongly en- 
courage you to do so," said Ron 



Hughes, graduate in curriculum and 
instruction. 

A law may be passed by a referen- 
dum if one-third of the student body 
votes and one-half of those voting 
concur, or if two-thirds of those 
voting concur, regardless of the total 
number of votes cast, according to 
the Senate Constitution 

A law passed by referendum may 
be repealed by a three-fourths ma- 
jority vote of the total membership of 
Senate or a subsequent referendum, 

Larry Travis, director of the 
Department of Intercollegiate 
Athletics, and Mike Jones, the 
department's business manager, 
answered questions about the con- 
tract to be signed between the 
athletic department and the KSU 
Student Governing Association in the 



Committee locates 
Iran-Contra money 



By The Associat ed Press 

WASHINGTON - The Senate In- 
telligence Committee has traced Ira- 
nian arms sales profits, apparently 
Intended for Nicaragua's Contra 
rebels, to a secret Cayman Islands 
bank account, the panel's chairman 
said Thursday. 

But Sen, David Boren said a newly 
written committee report has not yet 
determined "the ultimate resting 
place of this money." 

The report, released Thursday 
night, said information regarding the 
flow of money was in part "based on 
sources of unknown reliability," 
whose statements could not be in- 
dependently verified by the commit- 
tee, 

Boren said the report includes "no 
direct evidence that would state" 
that President Reagan knew of the 
diversion or "that he directed the 
diversion of funds" to the Contras. 

"You cannot finally resolve that 
question when you don't have the 
testimony of North and Poindexter 
and others," Boren said of two 
departed administration figures, 
Vice Adm. John M Poindexter and 
LI. Col. Oliver L. North, 

Across the Capitol, sources said 
the House panel investigating the 
Iran-Contra connection had notified 
independent counsel Lawrence 
Walsh that it might have to make a 
decision on granting limited immuni- 
ty to witnesses sooner than he 
wishes. 

These sources, who spoke on condi- 
tion of anonymity, said the panel 
notified Walsh of its feelings in a let- 
ter. "The House has to make its own 
judgment," said one source, noting 
that while Walsh may take many 
months to complete his work, the 
committee's charter expires in Oc- 



tober. 

Walsh had earlier written the 
panel that a grant of limited immuni- 
ty might create barriers to possible 
prosecution. Poindexter and North 
have refused to answer questions, 
citing their constitutional rights 
against self-incrimination. 

Boren said the Senate Intelligence 
Committee report reveals that 
Reagan met a number of times with 
North, then a deputy on the National 
Security Council staff, generally 
with others present. 

The White House denied last year 
that Reagan ever met alone with 
North over the past two years. 

Of the Iran-Contra money connec- 
tion, Boren said: "We take it one 
more step, the Cayman Islands ac- 
count. The creation of that, of course, 
is tied to the ultimate beneficiary be- 
ing in some way the Contras, But in 
terms of showing the final trail in 
terms that absolutely nail down the 
fact that they received the funds, 
no." 

In the past the Contras have used 
Cayman Island bank accounts — pro- 
tected by bank secrecy laws in that 
small island nation — for transfers of 
funds to pay for military operations 
in their war against the leftist San- 
dinista government in Managua 

The report said that after the com- 
mittee completed its initial in- 
vestigation last Nov. 28, the panel 
received information "indicating 
that profits from Iranian arms sales 
were deposited in account! s> in a 
Swiss bank called Credit Fiduciere 
Services (CFSt and that such ac- 
counts were opened and-or controll- 
ed by Richard Secord, Thomas 
Clines and Theodore Shackley. CFS 
then transferred money to its sub- 
See PROFITS. Page 10 



Police apprehend 22 
for drug possession 



By The Collegian Staff 

Twenty-two people had been ar- 
rested as of Thursday afternoon 
on charges related to the posses- 
sion, sale or distribution of illegal 
drugs in four area counties, but 
none have been identified as 
K-State students, said Capt. 
Larry Woody ard of the Riley 
County Police Department 

Woodyard said none of the peo- 
ple arrested in Riley, Pot- 
tawatomie, Geary or Clay coun- 
ties were listed as K State 
students on arrest reports. 

All but one of the arrests stem- 
med from eight months of in- 
vestigation by a federal Drug En- 
forcement Administration task 
force, he said The task force is 
made up of state, local and county 
law enforcement agents. 

Woodyard said 12 of the people 
arrested had been indicted by a 



grand jury on federal charges and 
nine were arrested on state war- 
rants issued by the Riley County 
District Court. One person was ar- 
rested on a 1966 state warrant 

The drug charges were for il 
legal substances including co- 
caine, marijuana, LSD and 
methamphetamines . 

Woodyard said the task force is 
still in pursuit of drug distribution 
suspects, but did not say how 
many people they were looking 
for. 

"Legally, I can withhold that 
(information* because I feel that 
it may affect the outcome of our 
abilities (to arrest the suspects)," 
he said 

Jerry Weis, associate professor 
of biology, said he heard some 
materials stolen from the Divi- 
sion of Biology over Christmas 
break might have been recovered 
in the arrests 



event the fee is assessed. 

Under the contract, the revenue 
from the fee will be placed in a 
restricted account and will be chan- 
neled directly to the Office of Student 
Financial Assistance to be used sole- 
ly for non-revenue sports scholar- 
ships, 

Students will be admitted free to 
all non-revenue sports events if the 
fee is assessed, the contract states. 

A concern of several senators was 
a clause in the contract stating if any 
of the conditions were not met, the 
fee would be terminated. 

The Kansas Board of Regents has 
the final say as to whether a fee will 
be assessed or not. In a memoran- 
dum attached to the contract, 



See FEE, Page 10 



Directors criticize agency service charges 



By The Collegian Staff 

Senate passed a resolution pro- 
posal Thursday night objecting to 
service charges imposed by the 
University on receipts of three 
student -funded agencies. 

The three agencies being con- 
sidered under the proposal are the 
Union, Lafene Student Health Center 
and Student Publications Inc. 

David L. Adams, director of Stu- 
dent Publications, said his agency 
gives back its service charge in ser- 
vices it provides to students. Dr 
Robert Tout, director of Lafene Stu- 
dent Health Center, and Walt Smith, 
director of the Union, agreed. 

The directors also said if the ser- 
vice charges are implemented, it is 
possible that increases in services 



for students would occur in order to 
offset the 3 percent service charge. 

All three agencies plan to pay for 
the service charge through their 
reserve accounts. 

In the proposal. Senate requests 
the service charges be enacted for 
this ficsal year as a temporary 
measure to assist in the University's 
current financial difficulties. 

However, George Miller, vice 
president of administration and 
finance, said President Jon Wefald 
has stated the service charge would 
be a permanent measure. 

Senate encourages the directors of 
the three student-funded agencies to 
withhold payment of the proposed 
charges until a agreement is 
negotiated between the University 
administration and the agencies. 



Athletic Director Larry Travis was 
available to Student Senate Thurs- 
day evening to answer questions con- 
cerning the non-revenue scholarship 
fee referendum. 

"Put it before the students. If they 
don't want it, then they will vote it 
down. Let them make the decision," 
Travis said. 

After more than three hours of 
debate, Senate passed the referen- 
dum, 36-4. 

Senate also postponed action on the 
constitutional revision that would 
allow the student body president to 
run for re-election 

In other action, Senate unanimous- 
ly passed a commendation to Kelly 
Welch, senior in agricultural 
economics, for receiving the 
prestigious Rhodes Scholarship. 




Tongue and cheek 



Dominic Fori una, center, and Torry Mathews, right, portray vacationers 
frightened by Dan Breese. a Hawaiian warrior, during The Young 



SUfl 'Sieve Wolgasl 



Americans' show. "Around the World in Eighty Fun, Wonderful Days." 
Thursday in McCain Auditorium. The 15 singers are 15 to II years old. 



Abductors threaten murder if attacked 



By Th. Abated pre^ American captives held at gunpoint 



BEIRUT. Lebanon - Moslem kid 
nappers said Thursday they will kill 
four men seized last weekend if U.S. 
military forces attack Lebanon, and 
they released a picture of an 
American captive with two 
automatic rifles held to his head. 

Anglican Church envoy Terry 
Waile remained out of sight for the 
10th day. He is negotiating with the 
captors of two Americans held since 
1965. 

The hostages threatened with 
death Thursday are three Americans 
and an Indian abducted Saturday at 
Beirut University College. 

In Washington, a Reagan ad- 
ministration official said: "We hold 
the captors responsible for the safety 
of the hostages We call for the im- 
mediate release of all hostages We 
do not speculate on any course of ac- 
tion the United States may or may 
not take." 

Defense Department sources said 
u kidnappings in Moslem west 
Beirut in less than two weeks promp- 
ted the United States to hold the air- 



craft carrier John F. Kennedy and 
its 1 1 ship battle group in the 
Mediterranean Sea. They called the 
action precautionary and one said: 
"The current posture of our forces is 
not a threat to anyone." 

The USS NimiU, scheduled to 
relieve the Kennedy, also is in the 
Mediterranean. 

Robert Sims, chief Pentagon 
spokesman, said the naval 
movements would "ensure that the 
president has all options available to 
him that he might choose" He would 
not say what military options Presi- 
dent Reagan was considering but 
dismissed speculation that Navy 
ships were preparing to evacuate 
Americans. 

The United States declared 
Lebanon off-limits to its citizens and 
told the estimated 1,500 Americans 
still here that their passports would 
be revoked if they did not leave 
within 30 days. Many of them are of 
Lebanese descent or dual nationals. 



A previously unknown group call- 
ing itself Islamic Jihad for the 
Liberation of Palestine made the 
death threat in a handwritten Arabic 
statement delivered to a Western 
news agency in west Beirut. Accom- 
panying it was a photograph of 
hostage Robert Polhill with two 
automatic rifles pointed at his head 

Polhill. 53. of New York City, is a 
certified public accountant who lec- 
tures at the college 

On Wednesday, the group claimed 
responsibility for abducting the four 
men, declaring in a statement that 
they used "the facade of teaching to 
carry out American intrigues." 

Secretary of State George P 
Shultz said in Washington that all 
organizations involved in the 11 kid- 
nappings have strong ties to Iran 

Seized with Polhill on Saturday 
were Alann Steen, 47, of Boston, com- 
munications instructor; Jesse 
Jonathan Turner, 39, of Boise, Idaho, 
visiting professor of mathematics, 



and Mithileshwar Singh, 60, visiting 
professor of finance since 1982. Singh 
has resident alien status in the 
United States 

Thursday s statement from the ab- 
ductors said: "After it was ascer- 
tained for us that the United States 
harbors the intention to attack 
Lebanon with the help of other 
Western nations, the Islamic Jihad 
Organization for the Liberation of 
Palestine declares it will execute the 
four American hostages as an initial 
countermeasure upon the occur- 
rence of this aggresssion. Other 
operations will follow in adequate 
places." 

It claimed U.S. Ambassador John 
Kelly was meeting with am- 
bassadors of Western European 
countries in Christian east Beirut 
about plans for a military attack on 
Lebanon. Embassy spokesmen 
declined to comment 

Shortly before the statement was 
delivered, students of Beirut Univer- 
sity College burned tires and blocked 
traffic in west Beirut's streets in 
another protest of the abductions. 



■MUM 



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'»•<»• 



-^^*"^Wi 



» ■ — 



KANSAS STATE COIXiQl AN. FrW.y, January 30, 1 987 



Briefly 



By The Associated Press 



INTERNATIONAL 

Soviet attacks leaders in article 

MOSCOW - A top Soviet commentator has published stinging per- 
sonal attacks on two former Kremlin leaders, saying Leonid 
Brezhnev became a "monument to himself" and Nikita Khrushchev 
betrayed the hopes of a generation. 

The article by former Brezhnev protege Alexander Bovin appears 
in the latest issue of the state-run New Times weekly, which goes on 
sale Friday. A summary was carried Thursday by the Tass news 
agency. 

The article contains the harshest personal criticism ever to appear 
in the Soviet Union of Brehznev, who headed the nation's Communist 
Party from 1964 until his death in 1962. 

Police charge third man in fire 

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - Police on Thursday arrested a Dupont 
Plaza Hotel bartender on charges of arson and 96 counts of murder. 
He was the third person accused of involvement in the New Year s 
Eve fire at the hotel. 

Jose Francisco Rivera Lopez, 40, of Carolina, Puerto Rico, was 
held Thursday night at the Rio Piedras State Penitentiary in San 
Juan when he was unable to post $2.4 million bail set by San Juan 
Superior Court Judge Carlos Rivera Martinez. 

He was arrested while driving through a working-class section of 

thf* caoitcil 
The Dupont Plaza blaze, the second-worst hotel fire in U.S. history, 

killed 96 people and injured 140. 

The commonwealth charged Rivera Lopez, a bartender at the hotel 
for the past two years, with 96 counts of murder and with arson, the 
same charges facing the other two suspects. 

Rivera Lopez was also indicted by a federal grand jury, whose 
sealed indictment was opened Thursday in U.S. District Court in San 

"-The federal indictment alleges Rivera Lopez "did knowingly pro- 
cure" the setting of the blaze, but does not elaborate on the charge. 

REGIONAL 

House introduces marijuana tax 

TOPEKA — A bill that would tax marijuana and other illegal drugs 
in a manner similar to alcohol and tobacco was introduced Thursday 
in the Kansas House. 

One of the bill's sponsors, Rep. Robert H. Miller, R-Wellington, 
said the proposal was modeled after a Minnesota law that requires 
payment of an excise tax for all illegal substances in the state. 

The bill would consider anyone who possesses more than ttti 
grams of marijuana or seven grams of other controlled substances to 
be a "dealer,'' who would have to obtain state tax stamps to place on 
their goods. 

Under the bill's terms, dealers would have to pay a tax of $3.50 per 
gram of the marijuana to the Kansas Department of Revenue. In 
return, the department would issue stamps that must be placed on 
packages of marijuana. 

For other controlled substances, the tax would be $200 per gram, or 
for controlled substances not sold by weight, $200 for each 50 dosage 
units. 

Miller said neither he nor the co-sponsor of the bill, Rep. Ed Rolfs, 
R-Junction City, meant the proposal as a joke. Instead. Miller said, 
the bill would provide an additional charge for people arrested for 
possessing or selling illegal drugs. 

"It seems to be working in Minnesota," Miller said. "At this point 
there are over 100 s&flhps issued and people are being prosecuted for 
not having these stamps." 



NATIONAL 

Three airlines initiate 'fare wars' 

NEW YORK — Three of the nation's biggest airlines fired the first 
shots of a fare war Thursday, announcing a new type of sharply dis- 
counted fare that analysts warned could mean more financial woes 
for the industry. 

Continental and Eastern airlines, both subsidiaries of Texas Air 
Corp., led off by introducing "MaxSaver" fares discounted up to 40 
percent from the already cut-rate "supersaver" fares. 

The new fares apply to a limited number of seats on all Eastern 
and Continental routes within the 48 contiguous states. MaxSaver 
tickets can be bought up to two days before a flight, but there is no 
refund in the event a customer cancels travel plans 

Supersaver fares, which are about 70 percent below regular coach 
fares, have a 30-day advance purchase requirement and a 50 percent 
cancellation penalty. 

United Airlines announced later it would match the fare cuts where 
it had the same amount of scheduled flights, although a spokesman 
declined to give the amount of seating affected by the fares. 

Spokesmen for Dallas-based American and Atlanta-based Delta 
said their companies were reviewing the situation. 

Nurses vacating profession in U.S. 

CHICAGO - The percentage of vacant nursing jobs in U.S. 
hospitals more than doubled in the past year, and the shortage is 
especially serious because it involves all types of nurses in all 
regions of the country, the American Hospital Association said 
Thursday. 

Declining enrollments in nursing schools, a negative image of nurs- 
ing in the media and women's increased access to other professions 
are to blame, said Connie Curran, a nurse and a vice president of the 
association. 

Hospital job openings for registered nurses jumped from 6.3 per- 
cent of all such jobs to 13.6 percent between Dec. 1, 1985, and Dec. 1, 
1986, the association said. 

"Some hospitals are better prepared than others," Curran said, ad- 
ding that some use pools of pari -time nurses to help fill the gaps and 
some hire nurses through temporary employment agencies. 

PEOPLE 

NBC news anchor to leave post 

NEW YORK — Network news anchor and reporter Roger Mudd 
said Thursday he's leaving NBC for public television because net- 
work news is becoming too much of a ratings game. 

Mudd's departure had been rumored since he sharply criticized 
NBC News for canceling the prime-time news magazine show "1986" 
that he co-anchored. 

He said he was leaving NBC because of the offer to join the 
esteemed, Washington-based, PBS news show to report on politics 
and government and because of his reassignment at the network. 

He said news management has changed over the years and no 
longer views the news as public service, but as "a promotable com- 
modity that helps the ratings." 

He said he was joining Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer on their 
show because "I think they regard news and information and fact 
and opinion with a reverence and respect that really is admirable, 
and I think it's a marvelous place to be right now." 

Mudd is the second high-profile network news figure to depart for 
publjc TV in recent months. CBS commentator and correspondent 
BiirMoyerS tefttlwt riMwork in November to produce documentaries 
for PBS. 



Campus Bulletin 



ANNOl'Nt'EMKNTS 

I I I \HN is looking lor a lew good volunteer* 
f »r this spring Don't waite away the spring hours 
- be a V LearN volunteer. Coil 332-6442 or stop 
t,v Holton Dull 02 

(-AKKKK PLANNING AND PLACEMENT Is 
now posting signup schedules for on campus 
employment interviews by Kansas, regional and 
national employers All eligible candidates are 
urged lo register and apply. 

MOKTAH KOAKI J applications are available in 
I'nion Aclivites Center and are due at S p.m. Feb 
6 

CONORESfltONAl. TEACHER SCHOLAR- 
SHIP PROGRAM information and applications 
forms available in Bluemonl 017. 

CAREER PLANNING ANO PLACEMENT will 
he showing tapes prepared by the College Place- 
ment Council in Haiti 107b Today's tape* will be 
The Inlerview" and "Interview Follow-up" at 

I 30 pm 

F ACL' LTV AND STAFF MEMBERS are in- 
vited (o attend a reception honoring Darwin D 
l.iverance (or his leadership of Personnel Ser- 
vices at Ihe University The reception will be 
Irom 2 lo 4 p m. Tuesday in the Union Sunflower 
Itoom 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION STUDENT 

i i»LN( 11.. ipplicatmns are availahle in Bluemonl 

II and are due Monday 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH will present five 



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actors from The tendon Stage performing "The 
Tempest" at 1 p.m. today and Saturday In Mc 
Cain Auditorium 

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF KANSAS will 
bold an information session (or prospective stu- 
dent senators and student body president can- 
didates 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday in Union Big Eight 
Room 

TODAY 

INTERVAKSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
meets at 6 p.m. at south door of Union 

FRIDAY FOCI'S ON WOMEN meets from 
noon to 1 p.m. in Union Stateroom 3 

COLLEGIATE *-H meets at 7 p m at Kenby 
i 'lii* -Tin's apartment 

SUNDAY 

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANS ON CAMPUS meet 

at ft p m in Union 207 

NEWMAN meets at 6 p.m. at St Isidore 

ACACIA i.iTTi.K sisters meet at 10 p.m. at 
the Acacia house 

ALPHA GAMMA RIIO LITTLE SISTERS meet 
at 7 p m. at Ihe AGR house 

NATIONAL AGRLM ARRETING ASSOCIA 
TION meets at B p m. at Valentino's 

STUDENTS ACAINST MULTIPLE 
SCLEROSIS meets at S 30 p m in Union 202 



S. Africa censors ads, 
imposes further limits 



By The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa 
— A judge nullified one of the police 
commissioner's press restrictions 
Thursday and the government 
responded hours later with new 
emergency rules allowing him to ban 
' any matter' ' he chooses. 

An attorney who represents news 
media, Paul Jenkins, said Police 
Commissioner Johan Coetzee had 
been "elevated to the country's chief 
censor." 

The commissioner used his new 
authority within two hours, issuing 
an order at 1 a.m. Friday prohibiting 
publication of advertisements 



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Judge H. Daniel of Rand Supreme 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Friday, January 30, 1907 



Shultz says 'no deal' 
to Beirut kidnappers 



By The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz said 
Thursday there are "strong ties" 
between Iran and the kidnappers 
of three Americans in Beirut and 
he ruled out any deal to win the 
captives' freedom by dropping 
prosecution of a Lebanese ter- 
rorist suspect. 

Shultz said of the shadowy 
groups claiming responsibility for 
abducting three Americans and 
eight other foreigners in Beirut: 
"It is our basic information that 
with whatever names may 
emerge they are to a substantial 
degree linked together." 

"And we also observe some 
very strong ties to Iran," he add- 
ed. 

Shultz's comments, in a 
satellite news conference with 
reporters in Europe, Israel and 
Japan, supported a White House 
official who said Wednesday on 
condition he not be identified that 
the latest round of kidnappings 
are the work of a cell within Hez- 
bollah, or Party of God, a militant 
Moslem group with acknowledged 
ties to Iran. 

Officials had said previously 
they were not sure who was 
behind the latest abductions. 

Shultz's spokesman, mean- 
while, brushed aside a threat by 
the group holding the three 
Americans to kill the captives if 
the United States retaliates with 
military force. 

"We hold all captors, whoever 
they may be, responsible for the 
safety and well-being of the 
hostages," said State Department 
spokesman Charles E. Redman. 
"Our position concerning ter- 
rorism and hostage-taking is 
firm. We're not going to 
negotiate, make concessions, give 
in to terrorists' demands." 

As for whether the administra- 
tion has decided to retaliate if the 
hostages are killed, White House 



spokesman Larry Speakes said 
"There are many options that are 
certainly available to us, but I 
would not comment on any of 
them, particularly that one." 

The Pentagon said U.S. naval 
forces have bolstered their 
visibility in the Mediterranean 
Sea and Persian Gulf as a show of 
support to "our friends in the 
region" 

Chief Pentagon spokesman 
Robert Sims added that the ship 
movements are needed to ensure 
that President Reagan "has all 
options available to him that he 
might choose." 

Three American instructors at 
Beirut University College. Alann 
Steen, Robert Polhill and Jesse 
Turner were among the captives 
taken this month after West Ger- 
man authorities arrested Moham- 
med Alt Hamadi, a Lebanese 
under indictment in the United 
States on charges of hijacking a 
Trans World Airlines jetliner to 
Beirut in 1965. 

During the hijacking, Robert 
Stethem, a U.S. Navy diver, was 
killed, and 39 Americans were 
held hostage for 17 days. 

The West German government 
still has not acted on a U.S. re- 
quest for Hamadi 's extradition 
and a reporter in London asked 
Shultz if the United States might 
consider dropping its demand for 
Hamadi if such a move could help 
win the release of the hostages. 

The secretary, who has been 
critical of the administration's 
hostage negotiating efforts, 
responded with a sharp, "No." 

"Our efforts and request for ex- 
tradition stands," he said. "I am 
certain it will continue to stand." 

"If somebody is indicted and 
there is evidence of complicity in 
a dire crime, the hijacking of an 
airplane and the murder of one of 
its occupants and the virtual tor- 
ture of others, in a civilized socie- 
ty we must follow through and 
punish such crimes," Shultz said. 



Aquino orders prosecution of Filipino troops 



By The A ssociated Press 

MANILA, Philippines - President 
Corazon Aquino on Thursday 
ordered the prosecution of soldiers 
and civilians who took part in an at- 
tempted coup and said the "gravity 
of the crime" was not lessened by 
their peaceful surrender. 

The government also said it 
thwarted an attempt by former 
President Ferdinand E. Marcos to 
return to the Philippines from his ex- 
ile in Hawaii. 

One Cabinet minister linked Mar- 
cos to the coup plot. 

"While we continue to cherish the 



virtue of compassion, we shall have 
justice in this case for we must have 
respect for the law," Aquino said, a 
few hours after about 250 rebellious 
troops and civilians surrendered at a 
downtown television station. 

The mutineers were the last 
holdouts from about 500 rightist 
soldiers who tried to take over key 
communications and military in- 
stallations around Manila on Tues- 
day. It was the most serious 
challenge to Aquino's government 
since she took power last February. 

She has faced down other 
rebellions, the most serious of which 
was a coup bid last November by 



soldiers linked to then-Defense 
Minister Juan Ponce Enrile. Some of 
her supporters have criticized what 
until now has been an apparent will- 
ingness to pardon the plotters, say- 
ing it could foster mutinous tenden- 
cies. 

Except for the group at the studios 
of Channel 7, the rebels were quickly 
neutralized, with one rebel soldier 
killed and 16 others wounded in a 
brief battle at an Air Force base ad- 
jacent to the Manila airport. 

"The gravity of the offense is not 
lightened and the damage inflicted 
on persons and property is not 
diminished by the perpetrators' 



change of heart," Aquino said. 

She said she had ordered Defense 
Minister Rafael Ileto to begin court- 
martial proceedings against the the 
soldiers and instructed Justice 
Minister Neptali Gonzales to charge 
the civilians with rebellion before the 
civil courts. 

Trade Minister Jose Conception, 
interviewed from Manila on NBC's 
"Today" show was asked if he 
believed Marcos was behind the coup 
attempt. 

"Probably so, because you cannot 
have three simultaneous attacks in 
three different places without any 
master plan," he said. 



Dean says research needed on new food ideas 



By KARI COMPTON 
Collegian Reporter 



K-State's mission in food process- 
ing research is to look at the pro- 
cesses and factors that limit its 
development, said Walter Woods, 
dean of the College of Agriculture, at 
a seminar Thursday. 

But Woods said it is not the depart- 
ment's role to make better products. 

"As we deal with people today, one 
of the things we are very definitely 
pressured upon is (that) somehow 
we ought to come out with a new 
sandwich or something that will 
make for an increased demand for 
some of our agricultural products," 
he said. 

Woods' seminar, "The Role of a 



Land-Grant University in Economic 
Development," was presented to an 
audience of about 40 in the Union. 

Woods said he agreed with increas- 
ing the use of agricultural products. 
However, Wood said the research 
program must be concerned about 
the limitations of these products and 
finding solutions to use the products 
more effectively. 

"I'm saying we should do the kind 
of research that allows somebody 
else to pick up and develop the final 
project," he said. 

"What we ought to have, as a land- 
grant university, is an aggressive 
commitment to research," Woods 
said. "What is seen is a tremendous 
ripple effect, by attracting com- 
panies to that center of activity." 



Although research is an important 
role in a land-grant university's par- 
ticipation in economic development, 
education also plays a key role, he 
said. 

Woods said land-grant universities 
must educate people at 
undergraduate and graduate levels 
so they have the skills to be com- 
petitive in the professional job 
market. 

"The challenge before us is to 
make sure we develop the talents re- 
quired for tomorrow, rather than 
looking at those talents we thought 
they needed yesterday," Woods said. 

Woods said another responsibility 



of a land-grant university important 
to economic development of the state 
is providing leaders that will "get the 
job done." 

Another role of the land-grant 
university is the transfer of 
technology, Woods said. 

"Somehow, we need to be helping 
people synthesize information to 
make it manageable for them," he 
said. 

"As a land-grant university, we 
should lead, we should be responsive 
and we should interact (with other 
institutions)," Woods said. "We 
should be an advocate of research 
and education." 



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Editorial 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Friday, January 30, 1987 — 4 



Future has few — albeit unclear — hopes 



I've been thinking about the future lately, 
mainly my own, but also how the world will 
be changing in the next 50 years. I wonder 
what will be different and what will be the 
same. I'm sure if I dug through enough jour- 
nals and magazines I could find some scien- 
tific predictions concerning economics, high 
technology and nuclear physics, but I'm 
more concerned with the people, their at- 
titudes and the effect of the future on their 
lifestyles. 

I don't like change, at least too much 
change too fast. I look forward to the future 
with a hope of reliving the past. I'm not 
ready for new innovations because I'm still 
trying to figure out old problems. However, I 
usually look forward to tomorrow because 
I'm planning to do what I should have done 
yesterday. 

Am I ready to program a computer when I 
can't even adjust the picture on my televi- 
sion? Do I want to attempt to carve a pot 
roast with a laser when I usually pinch 
myself on a can opener? I hope I will survive 
in such a world. 

New technology usually makes life easier 
for us, but I have doubts whether society will 
be able to handle the need for increased 



technical understanding. What types of jobs 
will people like me have? People who can't 
even go through a door without pushing when 
they should pull? 

It scares me to think that life as I know it 
may be totally different. I have a great many 
questions concerning the future and a few 
hopes. 

Will children still grow up the same, or will 
laser-tag replace kickball? Will kids still use 
the pencil sharpener as an excuse to get out 
of their seat? They might have to make up a 
new one like, "Teacher, I just coughed up on 
my keyboard," or "Uh-oh, I think I acciden- 
tally started a war." 

I believe young students should get ex- 
perience working on a computer, but I hope it 
never replaces the puppy Surely companies 
won't let shoelaces be replaced by velcro so 
the next generation grows up not knowing 
how to tie a knot. 

I hate to imagine inflation in the years to 
come. I'm sure everything will increase at 
basically the same rate — except my salary 
— and I hope candy bars will still cost enough 
to keep me from eating them every day. 

I think about transportation and can only 
wonder if we will be using shuttles to shoot us 



Company's regulation 
smacks of Big Brother 



A move by the management of 
nine USG Acoustical Products 
plants in eight states has left 
cigarette-using employees — not 
to mention the Tobacco Institute 
— smoking mad. 

The company told employees 
on Jan. 21 that they would have to 
kick the habit — on the job and at 
home — or punt their jobs. The 
measure, however, will not apply 
to workers at USG's corporate of- 
fices in Chicago. Between 1,500 
and 2,000 workers will have to 
take lung tests to make sure they 
are not lighting up. 

"Did I wake up in the Soviet 
Union this morning?" one worker 
asked after learning of the 
measure. Considering USG's ac- 
tions, such a question is not un- 
warranted. 

The company has, however, 
found it in its hollow heart to 
sponsor a six- to eight-week stop 
smoking clinic for employees, 
followed by a one-week grace 
period for those having a tougher 
time quitting. 

USG officials said they im- 
plemented the plan for health 
reasons, maintaining smokers 



have more sick days. So do preg- 
nant women for that matter. 

Although opponents are ques- 
tioning the legality of the 
measure, the company may have 
a case by the book. 

Before company ad- 
ministrators attempt similar ac- 
tions, however, they should first 
realize the ramifications. Firms 
which have these kinds of restric- 
tions could ultimately be faced 
with a severe shortage of 
valuable employees. Even non- 
smokers should ask if they really 
want to work for an employer 
who can control their private 
lives. 

One probably wouldn't read 
certain material at work, yet feel 
comfortable doing so at home. It 
is a good thing some employers 
haven't figured out a test to 
determine if an employee is 
reading potentially 

psychologically damaging 
literature. 

A man's home used to be his 
castle. Now, some employers 
want to make it Big Brother's 

branch office. 



Monetary investments 
keep students in state 



University and state officials 
are taking important steps to 
reaffirm the state's commitment 
to higher education as an invest- 
ment in the future. 

University Scholarship Day, 
held Thursday, brought about 150 
of Kansas' top high school 
students to K-State to be awarded 
scholarships. University Presi- 
dent Jon Wefald said 32 of the 
state's National Merit Scholars 
are "pretty well committed" to 
accepting $2,000 scholarships 
from the University. 

Efforts to reverse the state 
"brain drain" have also been pro- 
posed by Gov. Mike Hay den. In 
his State of the State address Jan. 
23, Hayden mentioned a financial 
aid program which would forgive 
up to $4,000 in student loans for 
each year the recipient works in 
the state after graduation. The 



proposal would be invaluable in 
the retention of graduates. 

If K -State's efforts to maintain 
standards that will provide these 
students with a well-rounded, 
quality education match the ef- 
forts being made to attract them, 
the University will be set for bet- 
ter times ahead. 

Kansas legislators are realiz- 
ing that one of the best resources 
this state has is its young people 
and that it can't afford to lose 
them. Offering them a monetary 
incentive for staying is a step in 
the right direction. 

If the state economy is 
prepared to offer graduates com- 
petitive job opportunities as well, 
these efforts will put a stopper in 
the brain drain. And such a stop- 
per will significantly increase the 
state's competiveness. 



Kansas 
State 



€®Dfl 




D8QDQ 



EDITOR 

Jonie Trued 
MANAGING EDITOR 

Sue Dawson 
NEWS EDITOR 

Erin Eicher 



EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 

Deron Johnson 
PHOTO/GRAPHICS EDITOR 

Andy Nelson 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Sheila Hutinett 



BDfTOHML BOARD: Sunn Baird, Sue Damon, Jim Dieti. Erin Eicher, Judy Goldberg. Ron Honig, Pal Hund, 
[Jerun Johnson. Judy Lundslrom, Scot! Miller. Andy Nelson, Patti Pauon. Julie Reynolds, Chrii Stewart, Te 
Temme. Jonie Trued, Unsigned ediloriali represent the majority opinion ol the editorial board. 



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Saturdays, Sundays, holidays snd University vacation periods OFFICES are In the north wing of Kediie Kail, phone 
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Kansas Stale Collegian Kediie 103, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kan 



■ '* fl 


RON 

HONIG 

Collegian 
Column is! 



up to a space station or drop us off at work. I 
think about how some of my friends drive 
and question if I would trust them with a 
rocket. 

Will I need to know how to overhaul a shut- 
tle when I can't operate a dishwasher? 
Traveling in space would no doubt be incredi- 
ble, but I have some traveling on this planet I 
want to do first. Besides, I hate to think about 
cleaning a spaceship. I bet the wax job would 
take all weekend. 

The clothes I wear are important to me, 
thus I would like clothes in the future to be 
made more of cotton, wool or leather, and 
less of polyester and plastic. It would be nice 



if we could afford to buy them, too, but I 
doubt that will change. 

The attitudes of people have changed a 
great deal in this century as America moved 
into the cities. I sincerely hope the future 
holds a civilization that still uses words like 
"please" and "thank you." I hope men will 
still open doors for ladies and "yes, sir" will 
not fade out of our vocabulary. 

With a lot of luck we will discover cures for 
cancer and AIDS. Maybe we can even find a 
way to make medical bills reasonable. 
Hopefully people won't sue each other so 
much because we won't give each other so 
many reasons to. 

If I had a time machine, it would be to the 
past that I would travel, not the future. I 
would go back to a time when wilderness 
could still be found and there was still 
something wild to live there. A time our 
grandparents knew and a time we can still 
see in their eyes and in their hands. Hands 
that chopped wood, built homes and baked 
bread. 

I want to go to a period in history when 
men were not afraid to fight for their coun- 
try. A time when men ran to enlist instead of 
hide, even if they thought the cause was 



wrong. Will the future hold a generation of 
young people who stand behind their leaders 
instead of electing them and deserting them 
when the situation gets tough? 

I'm sure people who lived 60 years ago 
would kill to live in the luxurious society of 
today. I bet they would be overwhelmed with 
the ease in which we can travel from place to 
place or cook a meal. However, with our lux- 
ury we created problems. We created acid 
rain, nuclear fallout and drug problems in 
extreme proportions. 

Is our comfortable way of life worth the 
problems? I don't believe it is, but everyone 
has to make that decision. Unfortunately, we 
can't go back in time. We can pretend by 
spending a week in the mountains, but we 
can't escape reality. Thus, we either try to 
take care of the problems or let the problems 
take care of us. 

Like a historian, it's the past I'm searching 
for. I'm looking for a time when I won't have 
to deal with problems I can't see or unders- 
tand. I look for that time in books, pictures, 
museums and people. I can never find it, not 
really. I can only imagine and dream that I 
have. This is what my future holds — the 
past. 




Emotional immaturity 

Definition, causes are unclear 



As an alleged mature person, I have dif- 
ficulty with people around me who exhibit 
signs of immaturity. I suppose it's a personal 
quirk since the word "immature" isn't defin- 
ed in terms of emotional development. 

Webster's New World Dictionary defines 
"immature" as "not completely grown or 
developed; not finished or perfected; in- 
complete." 

Nothing is included in the definition con- 
cerning characteristics of a supposed im- 
mature human being. The only reference is 
in terms of age — an immature human is 
younger and a mature individual is older. 

So from the dictionary definition, we all 
are immature in one way or another. 

My question is, how do we define an im- 
mature individual who may be older? Am I 
more mature at 30 than my fellow students at 
the ages of 20-23? Or does the 10- to seven- 
year span of time make a difference in 
maturity level? 

I am inclined, right now anyway, to believe 
age does make a difference in the level of 
maturity. Undoubtedly this view is due to my 
own prejudices but it's my opinion never- 
theless. 

The differences in the perception of the 
world around us is a considerable part of 
maturity. A more mature student would 
(should?) perceive the world in one manner 
— probably as an integrated whole of various 
parts — while an immature person would 
perceive the world in fragments. 

We each view those around us differently. 
My particular view is filled with a fair 
amount of tolerance (even in respect to im- 
maturity) but those around me sometimes 
seem to be extremely intolerant of others. 
And I do find my tolerance level waning at 
times, depending on the circumstances. 

Priorities also seem to indicate the level of 
maturity. Either priorities are non-existent 
or as a friend reminded me recently, the 
priorities may be too stringent. She was 
referring to younger members of her class in 
law school. They all seemed to be too serious 
about school and forgot the necessity of 
relaxation and stress management. 

I'm not quite sure how I define an im- 





JEAN 
TELLER 

Cnllegian 
Columnist 







mature person. It varies as to the aspect of a 
person's personality 1 consider to be im- 
mature. Even when it pertains to myself. 

For instance, I consider myself immature 
when it comes to social situations. In the 
area of meeting new people in new situa- 
tions, I am very inhibited and immature. My 
development of social skills is sadly lacking. 
Somewhere along the way, I missed the 
lessons on small talk and social graces. I 
never know what to say to someone I've 
never meet — especially in a social (read 
party) atmosphere and particularly with 
members of the opposite sex. 

On the other hand, I consider myself very 
mature in terms of responsibility and work 
situations. I handle stress well, I am organiz- 
ed most of the time. I am able to relate to 
people on various (other than social) levels, 
and I have the ability to communicate to a 
variety of people through a variety of means. 

But those points still may not define a 
mature person. Does a mature person think 
of others first? Does a mature person 
tolerate another's views and idiosyncrasies? 
Does a mature person put the past behind 
and concentrate on the present? Does a 
mature person focus on the world as a whole, 
another person as an individual? Does a 
mature person weigh what is about to be said 
before saying it? 

Does the behavior of members of a group 
running through a neighborhood after mid- 
night, yelling at the top of their lungs, con- 
stitute immaturity? What about the fraterni- 
ty across the street which insists on its 
members waking the entire neighborhood at 
6 a.m. by yelling and beating on pots and 
pans? Are these incidents signs of immaturi- 



ty or bad manners? 

My basic problem with those around me is 
what I perceive to be immature behavior. 

Those who gripe about things they don't 
have control over, never had control over 
and never should have had control over ir- 
ritate me. I believe in letting things go and 
working from the moment. What is past is 
past. What is important is what comes now 
and what will happen in the future. 

If that makes me a mature individual, fine. 
If it indicates my immaturity or the im- 
maturity of those around me. then that's the 
way it is. 

So, you ask, what is my point? 

Other than indicating to those around me 
that I consider some of them immature, I 
wanted to point out the abstractness of the 
term "maturity." 

Maturity, like beauty, is in the eye of the 
beholder. There are undoubtedly people who 
consider me immature — I even consider 
myself immature at times. I tend to open my 
mouth on occasion when I should keep it 
shut. You would not believe some of the 
statements I've made and then wished I 
could retract. 

What is important is that we behave with 
tolerance and understanding. All of us, no 
matter the age and level of experience, are 
immature in one respect or another. 

It's something 1 need to remember when 
my nerves start to fray because of the com- 
plaining and behavior of people I associate 
with. It is also something I had not come to 
grips with until I started writing this column. 

My perceptions of immaturity have not 
changed. I still consider those around me to 
be immature in some respects but I have to 
remind myself that I was once at that stage. 
And I am still at a level which some people 
would consider to be a stage of immaturity. 

I have to remember that people change 
from day to day . We each grow , learn and ex- 
perience things every minute. We change 
levels of maturity as the growth process con- 
tinues. We are not the people we were yester- 
day or will be tomorrow And that change 
makes the definition and perception of 
maturity or immaturity irrelevant. 



> 



' 



^ 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Friday, January 30, 1*87 



Letters 



Rally 'round Ron 

Editor, 

' Should President Reagan be impeached? 
According to the laws which govern this 
land, yes. 

But let's be real for a minute. This is 
America, and I'm an American. Thus, I think 
not (pun intended). After all, the president is 
the major authority figure of America, the 
man in charge, our leader. 

If one is cruel to oneself and is realistic, 
one knows that major authority figures are 
often no more than figures. They may not be 
reasonable, nor knowledgeable, nor compe- 
tent - but so what? They're still our leaders. 

To impeach President Reagan would deal 
too grand a blow to the American fairy tale 
we grew up believing in about the president 
being perfect and his thus being the 
representative figure of American perfection 
in general as compared with all those 
backward foreigners we keep having to bail 
out of the wars they start. 



So please, let's "rally 'round Ron," as the 
president's streamline conservative faithfuls 
are urging. If he goes down, we all go down. 
America has had a record of perfection up to 
now. Let's not spoil it. 

Kale Baldock 
senior in modern languages 

Cavalier attitude 

Editor, 

Re: Mark Houston's letter "Just stay out 
of it" in the Jan. 23 Collegian. Houston's 
cavalier attitude toward defenseless people 
would be astounding if it were not so com- 
mon. It is astounding anyway. 

Why is an unborn child "a growth of cells" 
and a child after birth not? Or should we 
assume that Houston is also "a growth of 
cells" that has not yet been removed? Can a 
few hours or days of maturity make that 
much difference? Maybe Houston himself is 
not yet fully mature. 

Or is it that the unborn child takes nutrition 



and oxygen directly into his or her 
bloodstream instead of eating and 
breathing? Then we should not waste money 
on intravenous feeding and heart-lung 
machines because the application of these 
technologies turns people into a "growth of 
cells" that can be removed at the whim of the 
benefactor. 

Most astounding is that Houston's major is 
listed as "natural resource management." 
Does he care more about trees and animals 
than people? Children are a natural 
resource; killing them is what is artificial. 

No, I am directly involved. All people are 
responsible for safeguarding the rights of the 
handicapped, the sick, the blacks, the Jews, 
the very young. If Houston saw some whites 
beating a black person or a woman being 
raped or a child being abused by his parent, 
would he decide he was "not directly involv- 
ed...* and) just butt out" or would he do the 
humane thing and come to the rescue? 

If Houston wants to leave the decision to 
just the people involved, he should at least 
consider the other person. That "growth of 



cells" certainly has an opinion in the ques- 
tion of whether he or she lives or dies. We 
have clinical evidence that unborn children 
are not suicidal; they prefer to come out 
when they are ready. 

It looks to me like Mark Houston needs a 
little religion in his soul. His mind is so open 
his brains have fallen out. 

Tom PUtman 
assistant professor of computer science 

Free expression 

Editor, 

I am in my fourth year as a student at 
K-State, and in those four years I have never 
had occasion to voice my opinion — positive- 
ly or negatively — in a letter. A problem, 
though, has come to my attention which I 
find upsetting. 

Recently I discovered that according to 
Student Governing Association rules, only 
recognized campus organizations may post 
fliers or advertisements on campus. To me. 



this seems unfair. We, as students, support 
this University through our tuition and fee 
payments, and I think it is only right that the 
kiosks on campus be available to the entire 
student population. 

I am more than willing to consent that the 
fliers be approved for tact or taste, but they 
should not be restricted completely. The 
same policy should be maintained for 
residence halls as well. A university should 
be an open forum in which students can ex- 
change information, and as long as this 
University is student-supported in any way it 
should not be allowed to censor the free ex- 
pression of its benefactors. 

Tom Lawrence 
senior in restaurant management 



Letters may be brought to Kedzie 1 16 
or mailed to the Collegian Editorial 
Page Editor, Kedzie 103, Kansas State 
University, Manhattan, Kan 66506. 



Teacher's brother says 
NASA exploits citizens 



T 



By The A ssociated Press 

FRAMINGHAM, Mass. - Christa 
McAuIiffe's brother accused NASA 
on Thursday of exploiting his sister 
for the sake of publicity and called on 
the government to abandon for now 
programs to put everyday people in- 
to space. 

"They shouldn't be using the 
public for something that's mainly 
for the government," said 
Christopher Corrigan, whose sister 
was chosen to be the first private 
citizen in space. 

Corrigan also said he feels his 
sister was used by the space pro- 
gram "because she thought it was 
more safe tbx " M *"*" " 

His comm< 
almost coir 
relatives 
schooltea 
with six i 
shuttle C 
after lifto 

Corriga 
merits ' 
newspapt 
for his 8 
parents t 
They hav 
the ace 
daughter 

Hesaic 
morale o 
way the j 
said he st 
cy took a 

"These 
I think it 
publicity 
Corrigan 

Corrigt 
ordinary 
space sor 
if NASA 
issues thf 
plosion a 
focus tur 
and awi. 
military , 

But O 
comput< 
ministral 



State College, where his sister went 
to school, added: "I don't think they 
should go ahead and do anything else 
for the moment, if ever." 

The National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration has put the 
space program on hold and has said 
no ordinary citizen would be on any 
of the next five shuttle flights and 
perhaps not on any of the first 20, 
said Edward Campion, a spokesman 
in Washington. 

"They're not going to put a 
civilians on until we are comfortable 
with the design changes that have 
been made," he said. 

The astronauts were told a risk 
was involved in space flight, said 



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■ ■■■ 



Letters 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Friday, January 30, 1967 



Rally 'round Ron 

.Editor, 

Should President Reagan be impeached? 
According to the laws which govern this 
land, yes. 

But let's be real for a minute. This is 
America, and I'm an American. Thus, I think 
not (pun intended). After all, the president is 
the major authority figure of America, the 
man in charge, our leader. 

If one is cruel to oneself and is realistic, 
one knows that major authority figures are 
often no more than figures. They may not be 
reasonable, nor knowledgeable, nor compe- 
tent — but so what? They're still our leaders. 

To impeach President Reagan would deal 
too grand a blow to the American fairy tale 
we grew up believing in about the president 
being perfect and his thus being the 
representative figure of American perfection 
in general as compared with all those 
backward foreigners we keep having to bail 
out of the wars they start. 



So please, let's "rally 'round Ron," as the 
president's streamline conservative faithfuls 
are urging. If he goes down, we all go down. 
America has had a record of perfection up to 
now. Let's not spoil it. 

Kale Baldock 
senior In modern languages 

Cavalier attitude 

Editor, 

Re: Mark Houston's letter "Just stay out 
of it" in the Jan. 23 Collegian. Houston's 
cavalier attitude toward defenseless people 
would be astounding if it were not so com- 
mon. It is astounding anyway. 

Why is an unborn child "a growth of cells" 
and a child after birth not? Or should we 
assume that Houston is also "a growth of 
cells" that has not yet been removed? Can a 
few hours or days of maturity make that 
much difference? Maybe Houston himself is 
not yet fully mature. 

Or is it that the unborn child takes nutrition 



and oxygen directly into his or her 
bloodstream instead of eating and 
breathing? Then we should not waste money 
on intravenous feeding and heart-lung 
machines because the application of these 
technologies turns people into a "growth of 
cells" that can be removed at the whim of the 
benefactor. 

Most astounding is that Houston's major is 
listed as "natural resource management." 
Does he care more about trees and animals 
than people? Children are a natural 
resource; killing them is what is artificial. 

No, I am directly involved. All people are 
responsible for safeguarding the rights of the 
handicapped, the sick, the blacks, the Jews, 
the very young. If Houston saw some whites 
beating a black person or a woman being 
raped or a child being abused by his parent, 
would he decide he was "not directly involv- 
ed, (and ) just butt out" or would he do the 
humane thing and come to the rescue? 

If Houston wants to leave the decision to 
just the people involved, he should at least 
consider the other person. That "growth of 



cells" certainly has an opinion in the ques- 
tion of whether he or she lives or dies. We 
have clinical evidence that unborn children 
are not suicidal; they prefer to come out 
when they are ready. 

It looks to me like Mark Houston needs a 
little religion in his soul. His mind is so open 
his brains have fallen out. 

Tom I'ittinan 
assistant professor of computer science 

Free expression 

Editor, 

I am in my fourth year as a student at 
K State, and in those four years i have never 
had occasion to voice my opinion — positive- 
ly or negatively — in a letter. A problem, 
though, has come to my attention which I 
find upsetting. 

Recently I discovered that according to 
Student Governing Association rules, only 
recognized campus organizations may post 
fliers or advertisements on campus. To me, 



this seems unfair, We, as students, support 
this University through our tuition and fee 
payments, and I think it is only right that the 
kiosks on campus be available to the entire 
student population. 

I am more than willing to consent that the 
fliers be approved for tact or taste, but they 
should not be restricted completely. The 
same policy should be maintained for 
residence halls as well. A university should 
be an open forum in which students can ex- 
change information, and as long as this 
University is student-supported in any way it 
should not be allowed to censor the free ex- 
pression of its benefactors. 

Tom Lawrence 
senior in restaurant management 



Letters may be brought to Kedzie 1 16 
or mailed to the Collegian Editorial 
Page Editor, Kedzie 103, Kansas State 
University, Manhattan, Kan. 66506 



Teacher's brother says 
NASA exploits citizens 



By The Associated Press 

FRAMINGHAM, Mass. - Christa 
McAuliffe's brother accused NASA 
on Thursday of exploiting his sister 
for the sake of publicity and called on 
the government to abandon for now 
programs to put everyday people in- 
to space. 

"They shouldn't be using the 
public for something that's mainly 
for the government," said 
Christopher Corrigan, whose sister 
was chosen to be the first private 
citizen in space. 

Corrigan also said he feels his 
sister was used by the space pro- 
gram "because she thought it was 
more sale tnr- i( *■■■— " 

His commi 
almost con 
relatives 
schooltea 
with six , 
shuttle C 
after lifta 
Corriga 
ments ' 
newspapt 
for his s 
parents t 
They ha\ 
the ace 

daughter 
He saic 

morale o 

way the ] 

said he si 

cy took a 
"These 

I think it 

publicity 

Corrigan 
Corrigt 

ordinary 

space soi 

if NASA 

issues thr 

plosion a 

focus tur 

and awe 

military \ 
But G 

compute 

ministrat 



State College, where his sister went 
to school, added: "I don't think they 
should go ahead and do anything else 
for the moment, if ever." 

The National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration has put the 
space program on hold and has said 
no ordinary citizen would be on any 
of the next five shuttle flights and 
perhaps not on any of the first 20, 
said Edward Campion, a spokesman 
in Washington. 

"They're not going to put a 
civilians on until we are comfortable 
with the design changes that have 
been made," he said. 

The astronauts were told a risk 
was involved in space flight, said 



Were A Full Line Brazier 
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We at Hair Westloop are 
happy to announce that 
Marcia Khaledi has 
joined our staff. Marcia is 
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new customers to call her 
for an appointment. 




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Friday, January 30, 1M7 



Television Index 





M»nh»lUn Cable 


KSNT <NBC) 




7 


WIBW (CBS) 




3 


KLDH (ABC) 




2 


KSHB (IND) 




8 


KTWU (PBS) 




11 


WGN(IND) 




10 


WTBSUND) 




12 


Premium cable: 






HBO, Showtime, 






CINEMAX, ESPN 






Additional cable 


channels 


not listed in guide : Manhattan 


cable channels 4 ( 


NBC). 


5 


(CBS) and 9 (ABC) corres- 


pond to channels 7, 


3 and 2, 


respectively. 







FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 1987 



KSNT WIBW KTKA 



KSHB 
CD 



KTWU WGN 



WTBS HBO 



SHOW MAX 



ESPN 



ispec- 



7:00 Today 
:30 ■ 



CSS AM News 
Morning 



Good Morning 
America 



My Utile Pony 
Tom And Jerry 



Special 
Mister Rogers 



Bozo 



Mm 

Bewitched 



Movie: 
'You Light Up 



Movie Cont'd 
Sufy'sWar 



Movie Show 



Business 
Sport sCenter 



8:00 
:30 



Program 



Sesame Street 



Brady Bunch 



Down To Earth 
I Love Lucy 



My UW 



Soldier's 
Home 



Movie: 
"Outlaw 



College 
Basketball 



:00 
:30 



Hour Magazine 



Pyramid 
Card Sharks 



Ask Or. Ruth 
|i Mil. Chance 



Mort&Mindy 
Day At A Time 



Sesame Street Falcon Crest 



Movie 
■Johnny 



The Flamingo 
KM" 



Blues" 



"Any Number 



Washington 
at UCLA 



10 



00 

30 



Jeopardy 
Scrabble 



Pnce Is flight 



Fame Fortune 
MaMej 



11 



:0O 
:30 



Password 

Wheel Fortune 



oungAnd 
he Resiles* 



The 



Ryan's Hope 
Loving 



Mary Tyler 
Moore 

Bewitched 
Soap 



Body Electric 

HilhaYoga 



Odd Couple 



Flashback 



CmPliy" 



■Thit'a 



SpeedWeek 
Sport sLook 



Ecology 

Ecology 



Hs Heroes Pern; Mason Movie 
Twilight Zone 



"Summer 



Dancing 1 " 



Aerobics 

Getting FH 



a 0:00 

1 *i:30 Days Ot Our Aj The World 



All My 
Children 



Dick Van Dyke 
HiHbiltles 



Sesame Street News 



Centennial 



Rental" 

Movie: 



Movie 
"Turk 1821" 



College 



:00 Uvea 
30 Another World 



Turns 
Capitol 



OnelHeTo 

Live 



For Daddy 
My3Sons 



Mystery! 



Dtck Van Oyke 
Andy Griffith 



■Dune" 



Duke at 
Georgia Tech 



2:00 
30 Santa Barbara 



Guiding Light 



General 
Hospital 



Munsters 
ZoobileeZoo 



Kitchen 

PairiMrct) 



Bug* Bunny 



Tom 4 Jerry 
And Friends 



"Iron Eagle" 



Movie 

"She Wore A 



Drag Racing 
Bodybui ' 



jiBJ 



:00 
:30 



Happy Days 



Magnum, P.I. 



Ghostbusters 
Dennis 



ScoobyDoo 

Smurfs 



We're Cooking 

Aerobes 



Ghostbusters 

Smurts 



ScoobyDoo 



Survival 



■Ape And 



Yellow 
Ribbon" 



Men's Comp 



00 Difl Strokes 
:30 Facts 01 Life 



Donahue 



ThunderCals 

G.I.Joe 



Square 
3-S-iC 



1TV 

Contact 



01. Jm 

Transformers Safe Al Home Movie: 



Super -Ape" 
Stay's War 



Movie Show Waterskiing 



FnL( 



ntertainment 
lus 



5:00 3'j Company 
30 NBC News 



CBS 



People 
ABC Mi 



sCourt 



Facta CM Life 
Gimme Break 



Sesame Street 



Facis Of Ufa 
WKRP 



"Shaker Run" Movie: 



Andy Griffith 



"luHbyOf 



Movie 

"On The Right 



SportsLOOk 
SpoedWeek 







6:00 
30 Wheel Fortune 



Nswh/wed* M'A'S'H 



WKRP 
Barney Miller 



MacNeH/ 
Lehrer 






Sanlord 
Honeymoonere 



Inside The 
NFL 



Broadway" 



Track" 



SportsCenler 
America's 



EDITOR 

Jonie Trued 
ARTS EDITOR 

Sarah Kessinger 
PHOTO/GRAPHICS EDITOR 

Andy Nelson 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Sheila Hutinett 



7:00 Stingray 
:30 r ' 



Scarecrow 
And Mrs. King 



Mr 



Wash. Week 
Wan St. Wk 



"The Tram 



MOVML 

"Escape From 



Movie 



On 



Br others 
Shandling 



"Outlaw 



Cup 
Top Rank 



8 



00 
30 



Miami Vice 



GurtgHo 
Oeds 



"The Delphi 



Fort Bravo" Bm Street" 



Blues' 



McLaughfr 



"Summer 



Boxing 



9:00 Crime Story 
:30 



Falcon Cr est Starman 



Bureau" 



Faces Japan 
Market 



NBA 
Basket bail 



Rental" 
Movie: 



"Richard Pryor 
■ Here And 



10" 



30 TomghiShow OattrtgSame M'A'S'H 



lite Show 



Nature Profiles 
Business Rpi. 



Honeymooners 

Magnum. PI 



SuperSonics 
at Warriors 



Don Johnson's 
Heartbeat 



"Mischief 






America's 

Cup 



1138 



MTV Video 



* Nelson & ft. 
Charles 



Ask Dr Ruth News 



a o:00 Countdown 
I C. 30 Gene Scot) 



WgW Track* ■ "Iron Eagle" 



"Thief 01 



"FrankAndl" RaceOne 



700 Club 



"LOMniAnd 

Liars" 



"The Beat" 



rPtay 
Night Tracks 



"Code Of 
Silence" 



SATURDAY, January 31, 1987 




KSNT WIBW 



"KTKA KSHB KTWU WGN WTBS HBO SHOW MAX 



ESPN 



7:00 Kissyfur 
30 Gummi Bears 



8 stain Bears 
Wildfire 



Wunlee 
Care Bears 



Tom And Jerry 
KideoTV 



Culture 



Farm Report 

World Tom. 



Movie: 
"Murphy's 



Movie: 
"Crisis" 



Movie Cont'd 
Movie: 



SpeedWeek 

Got! 



8:00 Smurfs 
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On Our Cover 

Five British actors, Trevor Bax- 
ter, George Ra is trick, Sarah 
Berger, Tom Mannion and Bruce 
Alexander, from various theater 
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campus this week to share talents 
and tastes in literary classics 
through acting workshops, stage 
performances, lectures and poetry 
sessions. See Page 4. 

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• • i ■ m > 



Letters 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Friday, January 30, 1987 



Rally 'round Ron 

.Editor, 

Should President Reagan be impeached? 
According to the laws which govern this 
'land, yes. 

But let's be real for a minute. This is 
America, and I'm an American. Thus. I think 
not (pun intended). After all, the president is 
the major authority figure of America, the 
man in charge, our leader. 

If one is cruel to oneself and is realistic, 
one knows that major authority figures are 
often no more than figures. They may not be 
reasonable, nor knowledgeable, nor compe- 
tent — but so what? They're still our leaders. 

To impeach President Reagan would deal 
too grand a blow to the American fairy tale 
we grew up believing in about the president 
being perfect and his thus being the 
representative figure of American perfection 
in general as compared with all those 
backward foreigners we keep having to bail 
out of the wars they start. 



So please, let's "rally 'round Ron," as the 
president's streamline conservative faithfuls 
are urging. If he goes down, we all go down. 
America has had a record of perfection up to 
now. Let's not spoil it. 

Kale Baldock 
senior In modern languages 

Cavalier attitude 

Editor, 

Re: Mark Houston's letter "Just stay out 
of it" in the Jan. 23 Collegian. Houston's 
cavalier attitude toward defenseless people 
would be astounding if it were not so com- 
mon. It is astounding anyway. 

Why is an unborn child "a growth of cells" 
and a child after birth not? Or should we 
assume that Houston is also "a growth of 
cells" that has not yet been removed? Can a 
few hours or days of maturity make that 
much difference? Maybe Houston himself is 
not yet fully mature. 

Or is it that the unborn child takes nutrition 



and oxygen directly into his or her 
bloodstream instead of eating and 
breathing? Then we should not waste money 
on intravenous feeding and heart -lung 
machines because the application of these 
technologies turns people into a "growth of 
cells" that can be removed at the whim of the 
benefactor. 

Most astounding is that Houston's major is 
listed as "natural resource management." 
Does he care more about trees and animals 
than people? Children are a natural 
resource; killing them is what is artificial. 

No, lam directly involved. All people are 
responsible for safeguarding the rights of the 
handicapped, the sick, the blacks, the Jews, 
the very young. If Houston saw some whites 
beating a black person or a woman being 
raped or a child being abused by his parent, 
would he decide he was "not directly involv- 
ed. ..(and) just butt out" or would he do the 
humane thing and come to the rescue? 

If Houston wants to leave the decision to 
just the people involved, he should at least 
consider the other person. That "growth of 



cells" certainly has an opinion in the ques- 
tion of whether he or she lives or dies. We 
have clinical evidence that unborn children 
are not suicidal; they prefer to come out 
when they are ready. 

It looks to me like Mark Houston needs a 
little religion in his soul. His mind is so open 
his brains have fallen out. 

Tom 1'ittinan 
assistant professor of computer science 

Free expression 

Editor, 

I am in my fourth year as a student at 
K-State, and in those four years I have never 
had occasion to voice my opinion — positive- 
ly or negatively — in a letter. A problem, 
though, has come to my attention which I 
find upsetting. 

Recently I discovered that according to 
Student Governing Association rules, only 
recognized campus organizations may post 
fliers or advertisements on campus. To me, 



this seems unfair. We, as students, support 
this University through our tuition and fee 
payments, and I think it is only right that the 
kiosks on campus be available to the entire 
student population. 

I am more than willing to consent that the 
fliers be approved for tact or taste, but they 
should not be restricted completely. The 
same policy should be maintained for 
residence halls as well. A university should 
be an open forum in which students can ex- 
change information, and as long as this 
University is student supported in any way it 
should not be allowed to censor the free ex- 
pression of its benefactors 

Tom Lawrence 
senior in restaurant management 



Letters may be brought to Kedzie 116 
or mailed to the Collegian Editorial 
Page Editor, Kedzie 10.1. Kansas State 
University, Manhattan, Kan. 66506. 



Teacher's brother says 
NASA exploits citizens 



T 



By The Associated Press 

FRAMINGHAM, Mass. - Christa 
McAuliffe's brother accused NASA 
on Thursday of exploiting his sister 
for the sake of publicity and called on 
the government to abandon for now 
programs to put everyday people in- 
to space. 

"They shouldn't be using the 
public for something that's mainly 
for the government," said 
Christopher Corrigan, whose sister 
was chosen to be the first private 
citizen in space. 

Corrigan also said he feels his 
sister was used by the space pro- 
gram "because she thought it was 
more safe thr » " *"-- " 

His comim 
almost con* 
relatives 
schoottea 
with six . 
shuttle C 
after liftti 
Corriga 

ments ' 

newspapf 

for his s 

parents s 

They ha% 

the ace 

daughter 
He saic 

morale o 

way the ] 

said he st 

cy took a 
"These 

I think it 

publicity 

Corrigan 
Corrigf 

ordinary 

space sor 

if NASA 

issues th* 

plosion a 

focus tur 

and awa 

military , 
But Ot 

comput- 

ministrat 



State College, where his sister went 
to school, added: "I don't think they 
should go ahead and do anything else 
for the moment, if ever." 

The National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration has put the 
space program on hold and has said 
no ordinary citizen would be on any 
of the next five shuttle flights and 
perhaps not on any of the first 20, 
said Edward Campion, a spokesman 
in Washington. 

"They're not going to put a 
civilians on until we are comfortable 
with the design changes that have 
been made," he said. 

The astronauts were told a risk 
was involved in space flight, said 



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. FEBRUARYS 


1987 
















KSNT 

m 


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KTKA 


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WON 


WTBS 


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MAX 


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Movie: 
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q:00 Scnuier 
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Wilderness" 
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a r\Q0 News 
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Movie: 
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FrWy, January 30, 1M7 3 

Museum cost 
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By JENNIFER LINDSEY 
Staff Writer 

Pending the results of a feasibili- 
ty study, plans for the proposed 
K-State art museum may 
materialize, said Arthur Loub, 
KSU Foundation president. 

"After the feasibility study, a 
recommendation will be made as 
to whether to proceed or not," 
Loub said. 

No decisions can be made on the 
museum until the study is com- 
pleted in April, he said. The study 
is being done by the Community 
Service Bureau Inc., Dallas. 

If the recommendation is made 
to go ahead with the project, he 
said, a plan will be made to raise 
funds in order to begin construc- 
tion. 

About $300,000 to be used for the 
museum has accumulated from 
contributions to the University Art 
Foundation. Most of the money, 
however, comes from a single con- 
tribution made to the Foundation a 
few years ago specifically for the 
construction of an art museum, 
Loub said. 

The museum steering committee 
is optimistic and discussing possi- 
ble sites for the art museum, in- 
cluding an existing building on 
campus, said steering committee 
member Sally Traeger. 

Ruth Ann Wefald, committee 
chairwoman, said it was a consen- 
sus of the committee to also con- 
sider the empty lot near University 
Inn, 17th Street and Anderson 
Avenue, as well as sites near 
Nichols Hall and McCain. 

In addition to discussing 
museum locations, the committee 
did some research on how it should 
be operated. 

To get a feel for how other 
university art museums worked, 
several committee members 
visited the Spencer Gallery in 
Lawrence and the Sheldon Gallery 
in Lincoln, Neb., Wefald said. 

"We can learn a lot from other's 
success," she said. 

Attention was paid to how the 
museums were funded, how the ad- 
ministration operated, the ratio of 
storage space to gallery space and 
even various loading methods. 





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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Friday, January 30, 1967 



Letters 



Jtal/jr 'round Ron 

Editor, 

' Should President Reagan be impeached? 
According to the laws which govern this 
land, yes. 

But let's be real for a minute. This is 
America, and I'm an American. Thus, I think 
not (pun intended). After all, the president is 
the major authority figure of America, the 
man in charge, our leader. 

If one is cruel to oneself and is realistic, 
one knows that major authority figures are 
often no more than figures. They may not be 
reasonable, nor knowledgeable, nor compe- 
tent — but so what? They're still our leaders. 

To impeach President Reagan would deal 
too grand a blow to the American fairy tale 
we grew up believing in about the president 
being perfect and his thus being the 
representative figure of American perfection 
in general as compared with all those 
backward foreigners we keep having to bail 
out of the wars they start. 



So please, let's "rally 'round Ron," as the 
president's streamline conservative faithfuls 
are urging. If he goes down, we all go down. 
America has had a record of perfection up to 
now. Let's not spoil it. 

Kale Baldock 
senior in modern languages 

Cavalier attitude 

Editor, 

Re: Mark Houston's letter "Just stay out 
of it" in the Jan. 23 Collegian. Houston's 
cavalier attitude toward defenseless people 
would be astounding if it were not so com- 
mon. It is astounding anyway. 

Why is an unborn child "a growth of cells" 
and a child after birth not? Or should we 
assume that Houston is also "a growth of 
cells" that has not yet been removed? Can a 
few hours or days of maturity make that 
much difference? Maybe Houston himself is 
not yet fully mature. 

Or is it that the unborn child takes nutrition 



and oxygen directly into his or her 
bloodstream instead of eating and 
breathing? Then we should not waste money 
on intravenous feeding and heart-lung 
machines because the application of these 
technologies turns people into a "growth of 
cells" that can be removed at the whim of the 
benefactor. 

Most astounding is that Houston's major is 
listed as "natural resource management." 
Does he care more about trees and animals 
than people? Children are a natural 
resource; killing them is what is artificial. 

No, I am directly involved. All people are 
responsible for safeguarding the rights of the 
handicapped, the sick, the blacks, the Jews, 
the very young. If Houston saw some whites 
beating a black person or a woman being 
raped or a child being abused by his parent, 
would he decide he was "not directly involv- 
ed... (and) just butt out" or would he do the 
humane thing and come to the rescue? 

If Houston wants to leave the decision to 
just the people involved, he should at least 
consider the other person. That "growth of 



cells" certainly has an opinion in the ques- 
tion of whether he or she lives or dies. We 
have clinical evidence that unborn children 
are not suicidal; they prefer to come out 
when they are ready. 

It looks to me like Mark Houston needs a 
little religion in his soul. His mind is so open 
his brains have fallen out. 

Tom Pittman 
assistant professor of computer science 

Free expression 

Editor, 

I am in my fourth year as a student at 
K-State, and in those four years I have never 
had occasion to voice my opinion — positive- 
ly or negatively — in a letter. A problem, 
though, has come to my attention which I 
find upsetting. 

Recently I discovered that according to 
Student Governing Association rules, only 
recognized campus organizations may post 
fliers or advertisements on campus. To me, 



this seems unfair. We, as students, support 
this University through our tuition and fee 
payments, and I think it is only right that the 
kiosks on campus be available to the entire 
student population. 

I am more than willing to consent that the 
fliers be approved for tact or taste, but they 
should not be restricted completely. The 
same policy should be maintained for 
residence halls as well. A university should 
be an open forum in which students can ex- 
change information, and as long as this 
University is student-supported in any way it 
should not be allowed to censor the free ex- 
pression of its benefactors. 

Tom Lawrence 
senior in restaurant management 



Letters may be brought to Kedzie 116 
or mailed to the Collegian Editorial 
Page Editor, Kedzie 103, Kansas State 
University. Manhattan, Kan 66506 



Teacher's brother says 
NASA exploits citizens 



By The Associated Press 



FRAM INGHAM, Mass. - Christa 
McAuliffes brother accused NASA 
on Thursday of exploiting his sister 
for the sake of publicity and called on 
the government to abandon for now 
programs to put everyday people in- 
to space. 

"They shouldn't be using the 
public for something that's mainly 
for the government," said 
Christopher Corrigan, whose sister 
was chosen to r- ***" <fa "* ™-iuat*> 
citizen in space. 

Corrigan atec 4 

sister was usee 
gram "because 
more safe thr*- 

His comm 
almost cod 
relative* 
schooltet 
with six 
shuttle C 
after lift. 

Corrigt 
ments 

newspap * 
for his s 
parents f " 
They ha* 
the ace * 
daughter 

He sail ' 
morale o 
way the 
said he si 
cy took a 

"These 
I think it 
publicity 
Corrigan 

Corrigi 
ordinary 
space sot 
if NASA 
issues Uu 
plosion e 
focus tur 
and awi 
military 

But O 
comput 
ministrat 



State College, where his sister went 
to school, added: "I don't think they 
should go ahead and do anything else 
for the moment, if ever." 

The National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration has put the 
space program on hold and has said 
no ordinary citizen would be on any 
of the next five shuttle flights and 
perhaps not on any of the first 20, 
said Edward Campion, a spokesman 
in Washington. 

"They're not going to put a 
■i »JH r«MM nn until vue are comfortable 

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Shakespeare On Campus 




Rehearsal 



This week at the University, as in the days 
of olde, traveling performers brought their 
acts to the public arena. 

The performers - five British actors - 
and the arena - K-State classrooms and 
stages - slipped into the worlds of 
Shakespeare, Pinter, Donne and others from 
the land where the sun never sets on classic 
literature. 



Trevor Baxter, Bruce Alexander, Sarah 
Berger, George Raistrick and Tom Mannion 
are members of a company coordinated by 
the Alliance for Creative Theatre, Education 
and Research (ACTER), University of 
California, Santa Barbara. 

The actors said Manhattan proved to be an 
interesting first date on their tour. 

"The Tempest," to be presented at 8 p.m. 




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today and Saturday in McCain Auditorium, 
will be staged in a minimalist fashion, using 
few props and relying solely on the acting 
ability of the cast, in which each actor will be 
performing several roles, they said. 

Except for a performance in London, it will 
be the first time the actors have done the play 
in this manner before an audience. 

"It is unusual to play more than one part in 
a production," Alexander said, adding that it 
will be quite a challenge. 

Baxter said "actors have a lazy streak," 
and this will cause them to work harder at 
their craft. 

"You must pay more attention if playing 
more than one part/' he said. The play is 
clearly written, but playing more than one 
part demands more concentration. 

The parts were fairly easy to keep separate 
because they are very distinct parts, Alex- 
ander said 

Another difference for the actors is that 
this project has no director. 

"The information we gather (from au- 
dience reaction) will be invaluable," Baxter 
said. "We will watch how they respond and 
we will bring more colors to the play based on 
that." 

"There is a strong chance some have never 
seen or read "The Tempest' before, it is an ex- 
citing opportunity," Alexander said. 

Mannion said, "By doing work in the 
classroom, the students will be able to see if 
we practice what we preach in our perfor- 
mances... it is the practice of acting rather 
than the theory of acting." 

Baxter said the students can help the actors 
see new things in the passages. "They may il- 
luminate a passage grown obscure through 
the passage of time," 

British actor Tom Mannion directs the 
movements of students in a stage movement 
class taught by Kate Anderson, associate 
professo